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  1. #1

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    The title says it all.

    Listening to a great group from the 80's, the Del Lords. My roommate played this all the time, but I actually forgot about the band until some random googling brought up the name. It's named after the director of many of the 3 Stooges' shorts, in case you're wondering.

    Great rootsy rock with excellent vocals, guitar work and an overall solid sound. Kind of like Bruce Springsteen crossed with Tom Petty. Never hit the big time, and disbanded, but came back together for some albums and shows over the years.

    It's often not talent but timing and luck.

    A couple of other groups/artists come to mind: Mudcrutch, the New York Dolls, the Late Bronze Age (Atlanta band), Scott Walker. Some of them are quite influential, or parts of them became famous later on. That might apply to the original Fleetwood Mac and even the early J Geils Band.

    Any nominations for other great artist that should've hit the big time but didn't?
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Listening to Little Feat today—yes they got some recognition, but gosh they were one of the BEST bands of the 70’s. So much better than the Doobies, who had a similar style and got much more fame and money.



    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  4. #3

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    I remember hearing The Soft Machine for the first time around 1968 when they opened for The Jimi Hendrix Experience.

    They played some of the coolest music I had ever heard - so unique!

    Regards,
    Steven Herron
    Rock Guitar Tabs - Solos, Tab Books, Instruction DVDs + Video Lessons

  5. #4

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    Anybody ever heard of "Rhinoceros"? Found two of their albums in a bargain bin in the seventies. Especially their first album is excellent - I still enjoy listening to it.




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    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  6. #5

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    I'm not very familiar with their music myself but I know the NRBQ are held in high regard.

  7. #6

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    Jeremy and the Satyrs. Not a lot of guitar, but I used to double on flute, and Steig was an innovative player. Did an album with Bill Evans around the same time as this LP.
    Guitars:
    1975 Guild Artist Award
    1986 Guild X-170
    1975 Guild Mark V
    1930s Metro B archtop
    1995 Epi Howard Roberts Custom
    1999 Godin ACS Nylon with synth
    ??? Giannini 7 string classical

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Herron View Post
    I remember hearing The Soft Machine for the first time around 1968 when they opened for The Jimi Hendrix Experience.

    They played some of the coolest music I had ever heard - so unique!

    Regards,
    Steven Herron
    Rock Guitar Tabs - Solos, Tab Books, Instruction DVDs + Video Lessons
    I had some of the early Soft Machine albums. Cool stuff, and they were like a breeding ground for great innovative musicians--Allen Holdsworth, Robert Wyatt, Andy Summers, etc.

    I think if you play avant-garde music in any genre you will always be a niche act. That just goes with the territory.

    Reminds me of the Residents, whom I saw "live" in the early 80's. Extremely weird yet innovative band. Even to this day, the true identity of all the band members is not known. And don't forget Snakefinger.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  9. #8

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    From Brazil...


  10. #9

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    From New Zealand:




  11. #10

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    Wishbone Ash. Always my favorite of the English progressive rock bands. Argus is a classic, but this album is also great.


  12. #11

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    I'm not sure they qualify, but I'd say Fishbone? They sure had their momentum in the 90's, but by all means they should've become a household name in my book, just like Red Hot Chili Peppers or Sublime. In the 2000's I used to go to every show when they were in town, and to me it was unmatched by any other band I saw, they're just superb.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcee View Post
    I'm not very familiar with their music myself but I know the NRBQ are held in high regard.
    Funny you mention them. I grew up in the same town as their current guitarist/singer Scott (blanking on his last name) and watched him play in numerous bands. Last one that I saw was called The River City Soul Revue and was all (70's)Stevie Wonder and other Motown, etc. It was one of those memorable bands everyone liked but just never went anywhere else but locally.

    I remember he and another member (Josh) were at my place and I played them SRV's Austin City Limit's performance from PBS, and they were amazed by his playing. They of course knew who he was, but I don't think ever saw him play and were amazed by his technique.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive View Post
    I'm not sure they qualify, but I'd say Fishbone?
    If you like them, I'd add this band called The Urge. They were from St. Louis, and I saw them play when I was in college back in the later 80's. They eventually got some measure of fame, but I never really liked anything but their early stuff. If you can find it, "Putting the Backbone Back" is a masterpiece of funk and hard rock which I think came along at the same time as the Peppers and Fishbone.

  15. #14

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    dr feelgood. greatest rock n roll band ever.



  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg View Post
    dr feelgood. greatest rock n roll band ever.
    Well, certainly among the best.

    Sent from My Blog Page
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  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    Reminds me of the Residents, whom I saw "live" in the early 80's. Extremely weird yet innovative band. Even to this day, the true identity of all the band members is not known. And don't forget Snakefinger.
    Have one residents LP, couldn't agree more about their innovativeness.
    Guitars:
    1975 Guild Artist Award
    1986 Guild X-170
    1975 Guild Mark V
    1930s Metro B archtop
    1995 Epi Howard Roberts Custom
    1999 Godin ACS Nylon with synth
    ??? Giannini 7 string classical

  18. #17

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    Upon consideration I always come back to Gentle Giant.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by A. Kingstone View Post
    Upon consideration I always come back to Gentle Giant.
    ... and early works of Van der Graaf Generator
    Make a jazz noise here

  20. #19

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    Procol Harum were a great band, I saw them once. This is a wonderfully poetic song, still knocks me out.


  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg View Post
    dr feelgood. greatest rock n roll band ever.
    Haha that brings back memories, I saw Dr Feelgood once, amazing. I had this album, love the sound Wilko Johnson got out of his Tele on this track:


  22. #21

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    The Meters are royalty in New Orleans but not as big as they should have been nationaly (IMHO).





    (I always include this one becuase it's my favorite.)

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  23. #22

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    Okay, I don't think there is a universe in which they would be huge, but they made a few nifty records.
    I'll always treasure Tav for saying, "We appreciate the dogshit out of it, y'all."

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  24. #23

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    Howe Gelb wrote several good songs back in the late '80s / early '90s



    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  25. #24

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    I'd be surprised if Bahari didn't blow up bigger soon. This girl can sing;


  26. #25

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    ?
    Quote Originally Posted by A. Kingstone View Post
    Upon consideration I always come back to Gentle Giant.
    Absolutely!

    best suggestion yet ????

  27. #26

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    ^ ^ ^
    <<< My BlogSpot Page >>>
    v v v

  28. #27

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    In one portion of the rock universe, Big Star was a very influential band, but they were never, um, big stars, despite making some killer records.





    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    In one portion of the rock universe, Big Star was a very influential band, but they were never, um, big stars, despite making some killer records.
    The lead singer btw was Alex Chilton who was in the Boxtops. A sixties band that had a few hits like
    The Letter and Cry Like a Baby which featured the electric sitar of recently departed Reggie Young.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcee View Post
    The lead singer btw was Alex Chilton who was in the Boxtops. A sixties band that had a few hits like
    The Letter and Cry Like a Baby which featured the electric sitar of recently departed Reggie Young.
    "The Letter" was the first 45 I ever bought. I didn't know it at the time but Alex Chilton was just 17 when he sang that song. Loved "Cry Like A Baby" too.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  31. #30

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    I have just learned that Lowell George (Little Feat) plays slide guitar on the Meters track, "Just Kissed My Baby." He was not credited on the record but according to Leo Nocentilli (guitarist of The Meters) it was Lowell George playing the slide guitar. Neat.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  32. #31

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    + 1 on NRBQ, the Meters and Big Star.

    Also NRPS--"Panama Red", one of the all-time great weed songs.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  33. #32

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    I liked a lot of bands that never went anywhere, and I think I can safely say that I followed them to that very same place.
    IF
    Love
    McKendree Spring
    The Free Design
    National Health
    Musica Urbana
    Judee Sill

  34. #33

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  35. #34

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    They never made the connection with American audiences that I think their music deserved. (They may have been quite huge in Europe; I dunno.)

    A documentary about the band's album "Sunburst Finish" followed by a live TV performance of "Fair Exchange," one of my favorite songs by the band (-though the sound isn't great here.)



    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  36. #35

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    +1 to BeBop Deluxe.

    Also Brand X featuring (among others) Phil Collins and John Goodsall on guitar and Percy Jones on bass. Percy is one of those "bassist's bassists" who is not nearly as well known as he should be.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  37. #36

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    Oregon is a group that we don’t talk much about today. Beautiful guitar playing by Ralph Towner and exotic sitar lines by Collin Walcott. ”Ecotopia” from 1987 is a recommended album.

  38. #37

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    The Gourds (great songwriters)
    Southern Culture on the Skids (catchy tunes and guitarist Rick Miller plays some great rock and roll guitar)

    Two bands I would never have heard about if not for the Oxford American magazine music issue.