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  1. #51

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  4. #53

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  5. #54

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  6. #55

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  7. #56

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by KirkP View Post
    My dad brought the Jørgen Inmann album home in the early 60’s and I played the dickens out of it. Wish I still had it. I think Echo Boogie was my favorite track. That’s probably the seed that prompted me to take up guitar a few years later.


    Echo Boogie was the flip of Apache and is a great tune--I think it was the original A side of the disc.

    Danny W.

  9. #58

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  10. #59

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  11. #60

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  12. #61

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    This came out in 2002 on the "Junk Yard" album. I was living in NOLA at the time and heard this often of 'OZ. Retain a soft spot for it.



    Here is Clint Strong playing it just a few years ago.



    Here's the Joe Pass version



    And the huge hit by Bobbie Gentry from 1967

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  13. #62

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    Axe master Johnny A has built his modern solo career on instrumental pop tunes, and nobody does it better, IMO. BTW, was hired as lead guitar for Yardbirds reunion tour.




  14. #63

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    I like that Joe Pass version on Ode to Billy Joe. His pop work often sounds called in, but he seems into this tunes. I’ll post a few.

    Rod Cook is one of my favorite rock/pop/blues guitarists in the Seattle/Tacoma area, and can burn the house down on this tune. (This is from a jam. I didn’t find a video with his own band.)


    Danny Gatton.


    Patricia Barber has a nice version with vocal, bass, and finger snaps. I’ve tried this feel in duet with bass, and it’s kind of fun.
    Last edited by KirkP; 04-03-2019 at 12:55 AM.

  15. #64

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    I am afraid I cannot see the point of an instrumental version of Ode to Billy Joe. It is a song, and it is all about the lyrics: the black-eyed peas, the biscuits, Choctaw Ridge, and the news that Billie Joe jumped off the Tallahatchie Bridge. But each to his own.

  16. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick View Post
    I am afraid I cannot see the point of an instrumental version of Ode to Billy Joe. It is a song, and it is all about the lyrics: the black-eyed peas, the biscuits, Choctaw Ridge, and the news that Billie Joe jumped off the Tallahatchie Bridge. But each to his own.

    Well, here's another one, Lou Donaldson's trick. It's a nice groove and catchy melody (for a groove tune).

    I wonder who did the first instrumental version of this song.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    Axe master Johnny A has built his modern solo career on instrumental pop tunes, and nobody does it better, IMO. BTW, was hired as lead guitar for Yardbirds reunion tour.



    This is great stuff!

    I met Johnny in the Gibson booth at the Winter NAMM in 2004, and got a chance to play one of his personal guitars. I immediately ordered a slightly custom version and bought another soon after. These are fabulous guitars, and I found Johnny to be an amazing player. These are still my favorite stand-up guitars.

    Danny W.

  18. #67

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    That's Tom T Hall (great songwriter) introducing Boots Randolph here.



    Dexter Gordon takes a low-key turn at it



    A studio-jam version...



    A curious approach taken by Oscar Peterson here...

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick View Post
    I am afraid I cannot see the point of an instrumental version of Ode to Billy Joe. It is a song, and it is all about the lyrics: the black-eyed peas, the biscuits, Choctaw Ridge, and the news that Billie Joe jumped off the Tallahatchie Bridge. But each to his own.
    To me it’s a blues. Yeah, 24 bars instead of 12 and unconventional chords (for a blues) in the last 8 bars, but I think blues when hearing it.

    One could argue that the most important feature of any blues is the vocal, but that hasn’t stopped people from playing them as instrumentals.

    I think the most difficult tunes to make compelling as instrumentals are in the Beatles repertoire, due to the complex arrangements that audiences might have difficulty deviating from.

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick View Post
    I am afraid I cannot see the point of an instrumental version of Ode to Billy Joe. It is a song, and it is all about the lyrics: the black-eyed peas, the biscuits, Choctaw Ridge, and the news that Billie Joe jumped off the Tallahatchie Bridge. But each to his own.
    I think I can see the point, but I agree, seems nobody in posted clips managed to do anything worth mentioning with this song. Though, Dexter Gordon was on the right track, somewhat, after a while, for a while. The only truly great version is the original.

    EDIT: Note to my self: Make instrumental version worth mentioning, if you can.
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  21. #70

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    'Ode To Billie Joe' Was A Surprise Hit That Prompted Dozens Of Jazz Versions : NPR

    Not all the versions mentined in the radio interview / feature, but maybe three-fourths.











    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  22. #71

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    In the spirit of the avant-garde, I played them all at once.

  23. #72

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    Very different from each other:
    Joe Satriani
    Sonny Landreth

  24. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59 View Post
    Very different from each other:
    Joe Satriani
    Sonny Landreth
    Yup, they be pop rock icons, said no one ever.

  25. #74

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    This seems to be the most recent article surveying the vast styles of instrumentals that were hits:

    Rewind the Biggest Instrumental Hits of the Past 50 Years

    I imagine if they said songs older than half-a-century more surf songs (Wipeout, Walk Don't Run) and a deserving nod to Santos and Johnny's Sleepwalk would be on here.

    If another pop culture wave (surfing), dance craze, hit film comes along that uses an all instrumental pop tune (who knows, maybe with some great guitar work) non-vocal music will just be in the background for the average listener.

  26. #75

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  27. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    Yup, they be pop rock icons, said no one ever.
    Confused. What are you saying here? Is it that, in your view, neither Joe Satriani nor Sonny Landreth measures up in instrumental composition, lyricism, pure chops, influence, popularity, etc.? Is it that neither is a pop icon? If so, does that matter? Many of the favorite instrumentals cited in this thread were not performed by pop icons, including your favorite, the little-known Johnny A.

  28. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59 View Post
    Very different from each other:
    Joe Satriani
    Sonny Landreth
    I didn't know who Sonny Landreth was until I moved to New Orleans. I like him a lot.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59 View Post
    Confused. What are you saying here? Is it that, in your view, neither Joe Satriani nor Sonny Landreth measures up in instrumental composition, lyricism, pure chops, influence, popularity, etc.? Is it that neither is a pop icon? If so, does that matter? Many of the favorite instrumentals cited in this thread were not performed by pop icons, including your favorite, the little-known Johnny A.
    It's about the repertoire.

  30. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    I didn't know who Sonny Landreth was until I moved to New Orleans. I like him a lot.

    That was the first tune I ever heard of him on a slide guitar sampler.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  31. #80

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    I was never a big fan, but he certainly became famous playing instrumental rock...

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  32. #81

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    Nobody's mentioned Mickey Baker yet, so:


















    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  33. #82

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    The "little-known" Johnny A has his own Gibson model. Just sayin'.

  34. #83

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    His surname is little known: Antonopoulos. I had to look it up.

  35. #84

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    Paul Jackson, Jr., one of my all time favorites for instrumental pop/rnb/funk/fusion.

    Check him out playing his composition, appropriately called "The Workout".


  36. #85

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    I love instrumental guitar pop and rock- especially from the sixties. In addition to jazz, classical and blues I play a lot of surf, spy and spaghetti western guitar instrumentals. Stuff like Miserlou, Pipeline, Wipe Out, Peter Gunn and James Bond Themes, Secret Agent Man, The Good, The Bad and The Ugly, Ghost Riders in the Sky. I also like to do instrumental versions of Glen Campbell songs. I usually do the Western and Glen Campbell songs on Gretsch or PRS Baritone guitars.Speaking of Campbell, here is what I consider a jaw-droppingly good instrumental
    Cheers,
    Ray

  37. #86

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    Great thread.....would make some Spotify playlist.

    Chantays wrote Pipeline after high school one day

    Here's one I wrote 25 years ago

    "6 strings this way and 12 frets that way and a world of mystery in between" Keith Richards on the guitar

  38. #87

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    Bit of Benson in Glen's Ain't No Sunshine!

  39. #88

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    Glen had a TV show and had some of the best guitar players join him..his duets with Jerry Reed are just wonderful..

    IIRC Glen also wotked on a Steely Dan album...
    play well ...
    wolf

  40. #89

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    Back in the 60's there were tons of instrumental songs on pop radio. And even in the 70's...remember the Love Unlimited theme by Barry White's Orchestra? The theme to SWAT?



    Not so many now. Though Nels Cline's Lovers makes me think we should bring it back. Still some life in the genre.

    And how about the almost wordless like Shaft? Love this video:

    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  41. #90

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    And this great one by Stevie Ray--shows the man had a strong jazz element to his playing. One wonders if he would have collaborated with players from the straight jazz world, had he lived longer. He also did a bang up version of Chitlins con Carne which is worth checking out.

    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.