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  1. #1

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    Can anybody recommend a thumb pick that is thick and does not slip? (Or what they do to the pick as not to slip out of the thumb).

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  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by swingtoneman View Post
    Can anybody recommend a thumb pick that is thick and does not slip? (Or what they do to the pick as not to slip out of the thumb).
    Fred Kelly in a range of sizes, materials, shapes and thicknesses. Herco are good for a while but as they warm up from the heat of your hand they start to slip.

  4. #3

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    Have you checked out the thumb pick that Ron Eschete uses? It looks like a regular flat pick with a little strap that goes around the thumb. I guess you could call it a strap-on

  5. #4

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    I used a standard pick for many years. I started to use a Fred Kelly Bumblebee because it gave me another finger to do hybrid with. Here are my thoughts after a couple of years with the Bumblebee.

    1. It takes a while to get used to a thumb pick. The Bumblebee is close to a flat pick but still different. If you are inclined to make the jump, give it a couple of months. I didn't like it at first. I doubt it felt natural to use a flat pick the first few times, but that was long ago.

    2. There is some restriction on how the string is attacked with a thumb pick, the angling in particular. It's not dramatic but it cannot be fully overcome.

    3. The index finger is now available and is handy, pardon my pun.

    4. I never lost the natural feel of using a flat pick. The thumb pick has become an additional skill.

    5. The Bumblebee is easier to transition to than many flat picks due to its design.

    MG

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue View Post
    Have you checked out the thumb pick that Ron Eschete uses? It looks like a regular flat pick with a little strap that goes around the thumb. I guess you could call it a strap-on
    Might these be the ones he uses ? I do know Dick Elliot uses ( recommends , endorses ? ) this brand - -but not sure which model.

    Strum'N'Comfort Revolutionary thumb picks.

    No affiliation w/ seller, etc.......

  7. #6

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    I had some trouble with this approach. The strap was awkward for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis D View Post
    Might these be the ones he uses ? I do know Dick Elliot uses ( recommends , endorses ? ) this brand - -but not sure which model.

    Strum'N'Comfort Revolutionary thumb picks.

    No affiliation w/ seller, etc.......
    MG

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass View Post
    I had some trouble with this approach. The strap was awkward for me.
    +1

  9. #8

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    I like the one invented and patented by Chris Broderick because you can attach your choice of most any pick to it:

    http://chrisbroderick.com/blog/store/





    A modified
    thumb pick strategy I find useful:

    1.Cut the tip and file it so it is short (~3-4 mm).
    2.For better upstrokes and for long single note lines, grasp the thumbpick with your index finger (or index and middle finger)
    3.For classical style, slide the thumb pick back slightly (with your index and middle fingers) and use your thumb/thumbnail.
    -----------------------------------

    "The instrument keeps me humble. Sometimes I pick it up and it seems to say, "No, you can't play today." I keep at it anyway, though." Jim Hall

  10. #9

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    I like the ideas below except filing the pick. I've tried that and ended up being a compulsive filer, always trying to make it a little better. That's just me. The Bumblebee picks happen to work okay for me, which is a major blessing.

    I do slide the pick down my thumb for "flesh" plucking.

    Here's another confession. I occasionally drop a flat pick. That doesn't happen with a thumb pick.

    Quote Originally Posted by medblues View Post
    I like the one invented and patented by Chris Broderick because you can attach your choice of most any pick to it:

    http://chrisbroderick.com/blog/store/





    A modified
    thumb pick strategy I find useful:

    1.Cut the tip and file it so it is short (~3-4 mm).
    2.For better upstrokes and for long single note lines, grasp the thumbpick with your index finger (or index and middle finger)
    3.For classical style, slide the thumb pick back slightly (with your index and middle fingers) and use your thumb/thumbnail.
    MG

  11. #10

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    what i have done to make them fit better was to take the thumb pick and heat it up some useing a heating pad wraped around the pick then after its warmed up enough I put it on my thumb and it molds to the thumb contours. Makes it fell more comfoitable and dosent slip as much. I have also cut the pick part off so i could slide a thiner pick in. so does any one know of a thumb pick maker that has the pick part at .50 mm.

  12. #11

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    The one that Eschete, and others, use is this one: Revolutionary Guitar Accessory - The Crossover Pick. I have one, and I've also tried the Broderick pick. I hate that one, can't use it at all, but the Crossover works pretty well. In the end, I don't like thumb picks that much, but it's by far the best one I've tried, including the Fred Kelly and Herco.

  13. #12

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    I have not found a perfect thumbpick. To be honest with myself, the limiting factor is not the pick or even the thumb. It's my brain. It requires a lot of repetition.

    Here's an idea though.


    Thumb Pick-6-finger-jpg


    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    The one that Eschete, and others, use is this one: Revolutionary Guitar Accessory - The Crossover Pick. I have one, and I've also tried the Broderick pick. I hate that one, can't use it at all, but the Crossover works pretty well. In the end, I don't like thumb picks that much, but it's by far the best one I've tried, including the Fred Kelly and Herco.
    MG