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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bradenton, FL
    Posts
    782
    I've had a great time reading this thread with 'jazzers' trying to describe and analyze bluegrass music - it's been a real hoot. If you want to understand bluegrass music, go spend a weekend at Galax during the fiddler's convention and maybe, just maybe, you'll figure it out. You don't learn this music, you grow up with it in your psyche - it's part of your heritage and is not to be analyzed and taken apart note by note - it's to be played, enjoyed and danced to - not explained by some musicologist who sees it as just some aboriginal art form to be examined as one would an amoeba. I was fortunate enough to know the whole Rice family - dad Herb (mandolin player), Ronnie (bass), Larry (RIP, mandolin), Wyatt (a monster player at 10 years old!) - never got to meet Tony, though. This music was in their blood - it was part of them - they didn't have to learn it. I think you'll find that true bluegrass music is multi-generational and passed down through families. True, Tony Rice may not read music but I'd defy anyone to outplay him when he was in his prime - same goes for Norman Blake and Doc Watson. Listen and learn.....that's the best way, IMHO. as always, YMMV.

  2. #32
    Skip -

    Spot on. In my view :-)

  3. #33
    I grew up listening to my dad playing accordion, mostly Irish and Scottish ceilidh tunes, no more than a few thousand, also any tune he ever heard since he had perfect pitch and an uncommon memory.

    Bloody awful technique though, so many mistakes, lazy bugger never practiced, and he couldn't read a note. Mind you damned if he ever lost a single beat.

    Yet somehow I enjoy reading music, thinking for myself and avoiding glib homespun schtick.

    And I try not to laugh TOO hard at those who do, or at least not till I have played with them.

    D.

  4. #34

    ..

    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Ellis View Post
    I've had a great time reading this thread with 'jazzers' trying to describe and analyze bluegrass music - it's been a real hoot. If you want to understand bluegrass music, go spend a weekend at Galax during the fiddler's convention and maybe, just maybe, you'll figure it out. You don't learn this music, you grow up with it in your psyche - it's part of your heritage and is not to be analyzed and taken apart note by note - it's to be played, enjoyed and danced to - not explained by some musicologist who sees it as just some aboriginal art form to be examined as one would an amoeba. I was fortunate enough to know the whole Rice family - dad Herb (mandolin player), Ronnie (bass), Larry (RIP, mandolin), Wyatt (a monster player at 10 years old!) - never got to meet Tony, though. This music was in their blood - it was part of them - they didn't have to learn it. I think you'll find that true bluegrass music is multi-generational and passed down through families. True, Tony Rice may not read music but I'd defy anyone to outplay him when he was in his prime - same goes for Norman Blake and Doc Watson. Listen and learn.....that's the best way, IMHO. as always, YMMV.
    Yeah this kind of stuff you can talk about every style of music. Not everybody has the opportunity to live in a big Bluegrass Family or get it through their "Blood" or something. That's stuff that nobody helps.

    You can transcribe every kind of music and can collect Information what the guys do or did. The same thing was made with Jazz. The First step is to take a look at the music and transcribe the Music, but than you can take analyzing what they do. Out of this you can took certain kind of rules or point out typical things which this guys do.

    There are Books about Bluegrass Playing and if you believe or not, they give advises which scales you should try to use about which chord etc. Only for example.

    So if i hear that, for example Tony Rice is using a Major Blues Scale or outlining Guidetonelines. If i see that he is using it. Why i am not allowed to name it.

    So for myself it helps me a lot, to analyse and took it by name what this guys do. To look what the guys play on which kind of degree in the form is a logical way of learn the music. For example - if they dissolve the Melody to the root, when playing the tonic in 90% case, so i can say "ok this is a kind of rule for the sound".

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