Jazz Guitar
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Posts 51 to 69 of 69
  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpalumpacus View Post
    Verlaine and Lloyd have already been mentioned, two of my favorites. This solo (@1:45) from Lloyd, by then a sideman for Matthew Sweet, just kills me, because like so much of his work, he sounds like he's teetering at the cliff's edge, but pulls it back in, and in doing so he does the lead guitarist's most important job, to move the song forward:



    They also were special to me as a guitar team because when I finally got around to getting Marquee Moon after reading it cropping up in lots of interviews, I had largely been a hard-rock/heavy metal guitarist playing in trio+vocalist lineups. Hearing their work did a lot to teach me about playing inside the framework of a song and feathering my parts in with another melodic voice. Those are lessons that do me right to this day.

    Mike Campbell has already been mentioned as well. The guy can play his ass off, sure, but he doesn't most of the time, and that's so important.

    Another technically great guy who doesn't get respect outside the community of guitarists is Elliot Easton from the Cars. Like Campbell never showed his whole hand, kept his chops in service to the song (1:54 and 3:05, the last one of my fave solos in rock):



    Technically challenged? Ace Frehley was one of two (Jeff Lynne being the other) who made me want to pick up the guitar as a boy. Pentatonic wankery? Sure. But it got me to pestering Mom about getting me a guitar, because it was primal, visceral. Of course, he's widely known and appreciated. Robert Smith from the Cure is another guy whose playing is pretty simplistic, but very on-point.
    Totally agree on Elliot Easton of the Cars. First, he wrote great songs. Second, the guitars sounded good. Third, the solos were melodic, tasteful and understated. I shouldn't speak of him in the past tense, he's definitely still around.

  2. # ADS
    Join Date
    Always
    Posts
    Many
    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    sanluisobispo CA
    Posts
    170
    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    I appreciate all the responses. If you can gather from the first post, I was really thinking of people who were not very technically proficient, yet were very influential in shaping the course of guitar in music through their creativity.

    But, there are a lot of guitarists who are underrecognized.

    Link Wray just came to mind...how many people did he influence with Rumble? Just a few notes, and suddenly everyone wanted to get a distorted guitar sound.

    Marc Bolan--hardly a virtuoso, but the perfect tone and the perfect looks for the time.
    Link Wray and the Ray Men The only Instramental that got Band was Rumble. He got his sound by either poking holes in his speaker or by placing tin foil over the front of the speaker he started when he came back from the Korean war.and I think he is a great Unknown, he is more known in Europe

  4. #53
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13,915
    One guy who I learned about recently is Alan Murphy, guitarist for Kate Bush, Go West, Level 42 and probably loads of other stuff - credited as the guy who took the Holdsworth aesthetic into the top 40.



    Shred at 3:11

  5. #54
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13,915
    Bloody love talking heads BTW

  6. #55
    I thought about it, but I can't single out one.

    Every time read GP, I see names that are new to me. I check some of them out on youtube. Every time, it's a great player.

    So I started thinking about players who really changed the way the instrument is played.

    Since I don't follow all styles of music/guitar, there are some I don't know.

    In American jazz, the names that come to mind are Eddie Lang, Charlie Christian, Wes and Django (at least for a certain group of musicians). I suspect there are glaring omissions from different eras.

    In rock, Hendrix, Van Halen, maybe Clapton, maybe Santana. I wonder about the influence of Link Wray, but I wasn't around for that and haven't read enough.

    Thoughts? Who else has changed the way the guitar is played?

  7. #56
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13,915
    I should start making them up and putting up fraudulent Wikipedia pages.

  8. #57
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    193
    Roy Wood comes to mind, leader of the Move, Wizzard, etc. Is that him doing the Django imitation on "French Perfume"? Or check out the classical medley on the long version of Cherry Blossom Clinic.

  9. #58
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    193
    Love Halsall's playing on the Rutles records.

  10. #59
    how much were/are Cal Collins and Ron Eschete appreciated outside a few jazz aficionados...for me, just as good as it gets

  11. #60
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Greenacres, FL
    Posts
    12,758
    I liked Garry Roberts of The Boomtown Rats. (I liked this whole album. The "hit" was "I Don't Like Mondays" but there are several strong songs on the album and the sequencing of them is excellent.)

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  12. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    3,155
    Larry Campbell.



    Jimmy Herring.



    In an odd way even Bob Weir (if only due to standing next to Garcia and Lesh for a few decades), whose playing is just unique but perhaps unique to the point that he has influenced few.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  13. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    cali
    Posts
    6,519
    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar View Post
    I wonder about the influence of Link Wray, but I wasn't around for that and haven't read enough.

    Thoughts?

    link wray was huge influence on early r&r...jimmy page!!, john cippolina of quicksilver, countless garage bands..rumbles one of the great nasty 45's of all time!!

    then he came back in post punk 70's with rockabilly (robert gordon) and influenced all over again...cramps, psychobilly, etc

    a legend



    cheers

  14. #63
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Belgrade, Serbia
    Posts
    3,288
    The intro, and the other solo ... whole song is a masterpiece of a kind ... :




    ... and of course ... Snakefinger ...



    ... just to add, without clips:

    Olga, from The Toy Dolls
    ^ ^ ^
    <<< My BlogSpot Page >>>
    v v v

  15. #64
    [QUOTE=Cunamara;897537]Larry Campbell.



    i'm going to have to play my trump card on your Big River post - Guthrie Trap/Robert's Western World - so tasty. My cover money would be to hear Guthrie any day over Mr. C. Plus it's the right key.


  16. #65
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    sanluisobispo CA
    Posts
    170
    here is a player that isn't Know as well as he should be. Who was the guitar player for the E street Band but was also a Guitarist for Crazy Horse. Helped Neal Young on some Lps. Nels Lofgrin.

  17. #66
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13,915
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    link wray was huge influence on early r&r...jimmy page!!, john cippolina of quicksilver, countless garage bands..rumbles one of the great nasty 45's of all time!!

    then he came back in post punk 70's with rockabilly (robert gordon) and influenced all over again...cramps, psychobilly, etc

    a legend



    cheers
    Bill clearly agrees.



    Also, he did this thing:


  18. #67
    White belt
    My Youtube

  19. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Bill clearly agrees.



    Also, he did this thing:

    Awesome, lets hope Rumble will become a standard now. Im tired of blank stares when i call this tune on gigs.

  20. #69
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    cali
    Posts
    6,519
    best part of rumble is you can hear link ramping up his premier amps trem on the outro...really takes it out!

    great pic of a fans collection of very similar gear to what link wray used..premier 71 amp with fc 12" & two 3" tweeters!

    danelectro, supro and yamaha guitars

    Underappreciated guitar heroes-jvx1mh_lsrwly5kek28cow-jpg

    cheers

Join our Facebook Page

Get in Touch


Jazz Guitar eBooks
How To Get a Jazz Guitar Tone?
Privacy Policy

 

 

 

Follow us on:

Jazz Guitar Online on FacebookJazz Guitar Online on TwitterJazz Guitar Online on YoutubeJazz Guitar Online RSS Feed