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  1. #1

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  3. #2

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    As being someone who is 60 years old and remebers when a new Jimi Hendrix album would actually come out. I find just about all posthumous releases not very inspiring as well as offensive to the artist themself.
    This is especially true in artist like Jimi where he had such artistic abilities beyond guitar alone. So the albums don't contain his musical vision, but rather odds and ends of his guitar playing or song ideas.

  4. #3

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    Jimi's estate has been milking whatever they could find.

    I would really like to know if they possess the complete take of Jimi's solo on Little Wing because the numbnut who mastered the album faded the solo out just as Jimi was getting going.
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  5. #4

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    I always find it a disgrace that our society hardly supports any true artist of Jimi's talents, and then can't seem to worship his leagcy enough when they're dead! I heven hate these Tribute Shows with fine players like Eric Johnson,etc. or worse at local levels milking Jimi's Hendrix, SRV, etc...
    Funny you don't see a Wes Montgomery Tribute show other than as a one off salute!

  6. #5

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    Jimi sure has been busy these last years. He must be living in the studio !

  7. #6

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    Real Jimi fans shouldn't support stuff like this, especially this long after he's transitioned. It's stuff Jimi didn't want released, usually rough jams of song ideas, or just plain jams none meant to be released. Part of being an artist is controlling what the world gets and what remains in the closet.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  8. #7

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    I respectfully disagree. I have heard many of his legacy recordings, including the 2 remasters "Valleys of Neptune" and "People, Hell and Angels." These were engineered by Eddie Kramer and approved by his sister. They are a huge improvement over the bootlegs that have been circulating.

    The quality of the recording and performances is very good. Some songs like Hear My Train A'Coming and Freedom are just great songs that he had been working on quite awhile and played live but didn't release on a studio album during his lifetime.

    Of course, these are not albums in the coherent sense that Electric Ladyland was. But they are a fine collection of songs that any artist would be proud of.

    I am all for these releases--if well engineered and approved by the estate--as they often illuminate the creative process of the artist. The Beatles and Dylan are good examples of late releases of unfinished or bootleg material that is very intriguing--not all top-shelf of course, but generally of great interest to the real fans.

    No posthumous recording is ever approved by the artist, of course--including the releases by Wes in the last few years.

  9. #8

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    Difference between most of Jimi and Wes's posthumous releases were Jim Hendrix was more of a overall concept record vs. Wes Montgomery's being a guitarist blowing through changes/songs

    I guess an argument could be made Wes was also a song writer as well. But his concepts were more based on the songs and just music.
    Jimi was a not only revered for guitar playing but mostly his songwriting, story concepts, fashion style, album artwork,etc. Much like Prince tried to emulate more in recent decades.

    So when thes albums/CD's are released they lack Jimi's Artistry and Vision for lack of better terms. And it usually isn't his better songwriting or guitar abilities that showcased unfortunately!

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by jads57 View Post
    I always find it a disgrace that our society hardly supports any true artist of Jimi's talents, and then can't seem to worship his legacy enough when they're dead! I even hate these Tribute Shows with fine players like Eric Johnson,etc. or worse at local levels milking Jimi's Hendrix, SRV, etc...
    Funny you don't see a Wes Montgomery Tribute show other than as a one off salute!

    The tribute concerts I've been to were just for fun. I've recently seen a Pink Floyd and a Beatles concert. The musicians job was to look and act like the originals. They made the audience happy. Job well done.

    I recently saw a Monkees concert. Only two of the Monkees were there. Those two joked that when one of them died, the act would carry on with the name The Monkee. Once again, the audience loved them for the nostalgia.

    I don't think there will be a Wes tribute. He was more of a night club performer and had little flamboyance. I don't think he did the duck walk or played with his teeth.

    This may be as close as you'll get:

    MG

  11. #10

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    Saw that movie about Hank Garland as well. I thought that was sappy tribute to the actual genius of both great guitrists.

    Tribute shows make $$ by Mythologizing the very people they claim to have inspired them. Don't be a poor imitation, be yourself and take lessons from the greats. It's down right dishonest marketing yourself on the legends themselves, and great musicians like Eric Gayles, Eric Johnson and others should stay away from it.

    The marketing guys tried doing this with The Marsalis Bros, and the new Young Lions as well. Like Mark Whitfield, etc. as rightful heirs to Wes Montgomery, and all other instruments. And while it brought renewed interest in Miles ,Trane, etc. It faded just as quickly and the music was never that level of the greats it was based upon.


    Maybe I'm being to purist here, but these guys were above the rest. Along with Coltrane,Jaco,Parker,Davis,etc. It's always best to hear the masters themselves, even it's just on CD vs. imitators performing live. Do what they did be original!

  12. #11

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    Posthumous releases can vary situation to situation though 37 years raises doubts quickly. I learned in the 80's after buying a couple of "previously unreleased" Miles albums, that there was good reason the material was never released; it wasn't up to standards, it belonged in the dumpster. Now I knew and understood far less about jazz than I know now, but I remember one Miles album that was just lifeless, flat and terribly out of sync with itself. Turns out everybody in the band except Miles was DRUNK and had been so for most of the afternoon. The studio time was already paid for so they went ahead. This information was in the LP liner notes printed inside the double disc so you didn't see that before you bought it. I remember listening and thinking this sucks, then grabbing the jacket and reading. Lesson learned; unreleased to me means they can keep it.
    FWIW, John McLoughlin has in his possession about 200 hours of tapes of he and Jimi jamming. No, he won't release them.
    Last edited by whiskey02; 01-04-2018 at 06:21 PM.
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  13. #12

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    I'm very excited for the release. The Miami Pop Festival from May 18, 1968 that was released in 2013 is very good.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02 View Post
    ...
    FWIW, John McLoughlin has in his possession about 200 hours of tapes of he and Jimi jamming. No, he won't release them.
    Do you have a source for that info? Seems highly improbable to me. Simple math: If they spent 40 hours per week together jamming and recording that would end up being 5 weeks time. Counting some down time that could be a month and a half, or more, of collaboration. I doubt that either one of them would have had the time and the fact that there is no available product of any of it makes me think that they jammed for one or two nights.

    On the subject of these posthumously released materials I can see both sides, but there isn't really that much Hendrix that came out with Eddie Kramer's input. There is a little bit of worth in that for me.

  15. #14

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    I agree that it is sappy. On the positive side, the movie showcased some fab guitars.

    I get what you're saying about tribute artists. I wonder why they don't push the envelope further. My guess is that they are doing the best they can and may be incapable of traveling deeply into uncharted territory due to creative constraints.

    I will not change my mind on tribute bands that try to recreate the acts of times past. They do exactly what they advertise. There is no pretense. And who hasn't enjoyed seeing an Elvis impersonator? It's just for fun and nostalgia.

    Quote Originally Posted by jads57 View Post
    Saw that movie about Hank Garland as well. I thought that was sappy tribute to the actual genius of both great guitarists.

    Tribute shows make $$ by Mythologizing the very people they claim to have inspired them. Don't be a poor imitation, be yourself and take lessons from the greats. It's down right dishonest marketing yourself on the legends themselves, and great musicians like Eric Gayles, Eric Johnson and others should stay away from it.
    MG

  16. #15

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    The tribute show is a different kettle of fish than a posthumous release...at least with the tribute show you know it's "fake."

    There was a radio show on a Stones tribute band that was very successful--performed songs from the 60's and 70's--to the point the Stones would even show up for them and booked them as a warm-up act on one occasion.

    The tribute band does require a certain suspension of disbelief. I have seen some Johnny Cash tributes that were very good--one called Church of Cash in Minneapolis that is superb indeed.

    Re' posthumous releases, the only criterion is, is it any good. I liked about half the songs on the remastered Hendrix albums and listen to the stuff pretty frequently, because he only put out a couple of hours of music in his lifetime. Even 80% quality Hendrix is pretty good.

    Re' did the artist approve it--doesn't bother me in the least if he/she did or didn't or who makes the money. They're not around to be p***ed off about it. Approved and well-produced releases are preferable to boots almost all the time.

  17. #16

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    So this brings up what really matters musically. I feel that Pandora's Box was opened with MTV first, then You Tube,Iphone,etc.
    Everyone says how wonderful it is to have access to anything you want. But at what cost?

    Artist like Jimi Hendrix are now available for free on many platform streams, and are badly recreated by Tribute Shows which hardly ever feature the great songs he wrote in favor of some lame version of "Voodoo Chile"
    I even found SRV's version weak since it was so note for note copied from the Electric Lady Land version, along with switching p/up noises included,LOL!

    There are no Jimi Hendrix's because we as a society don't embrace truly creative music artists any more. Or at least in Music. We just want nostalgia, and or as much Free Stuff as we can get. And the Corporates want to sell only what sells. Not so different from the past except for one important detail. The Golden Goose (The Talent ) and all that accompanied it was killed. By not supporting it financially
    $$$$.

    Also as mean as this sounds , all of these so called newer bands, are basically lame versions of what has already been done. And this is true in every style as well. Only thing better is the tools to record with. Do I sound jaded, and angry enough? You bet, I want the kids to raise the bar ,not lower it. And Jimi, Miles, Jaco, The Beatles, Sting, George Martin , Jeff beck, Thelonius Monk, Coltrane, Wes, Brian Wilson, Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, demand at as well!