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  1. #101

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    What about the Texas Troubadours? At least we got Speedy and Bryant (the first telecaster player?)

    Texas Troubadours:



    ... A young Willie Nelson is a nice treat, no? Listen to that guitar work! Leon play, play on Leon!

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    Some more Texas Troubadours


  4. #103

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    And more Merle Haggard


  5. #104

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    I knew a guy that was a serious C&W fan and record collector and had seen lots of the classic acts. He said the Texas Troubadours were the best band. He also said Bill Anderson's Po' Boys were excellent. Bill Anderson isn't exactly a house hold name outside of countrydom but he's a giant.


  6. #105

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    Tom T. Hall is another great that isn't as well known as he should be.


  7. #106

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    Here's Red keepin' it real. Keep your hankies handy.


  8. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxTwang View Post
    And more Merle Haggard ("Workin' Man Blues")
    Is that James Burton on guitar there?
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  9. #108

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcee View Post
    Tom T. Hall is another great that isn't as well known as he should be.
    I grew up listening to him. Used to play "The Ballad of Forty Dollars" in public now and then. Fun song.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  10. #109

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    Now I know THIS is James Burton---I think he was only 17 or so at the time.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  11. #110

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Is that James Burton on guitar there?
    I believe it is, and that he played on some other of his classic sides from that era like Fightin' Side Of Me and Mama Tried. The story I heard was that Burton got called for the session to play along with Haggard's regular guitar player Roy Nichols. Roy supposedly deferred to Burton and said that he'd lay out and just watch and listen.
    Last edited by mrcee; 01-16-2016 at 10:50 AM.

  12. #111

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcee View Post
    I never knew Brent Mason could sing. I love that 9th chord at 5:00.
    I've heard him do vocals at jam sessions like this before. Here's another one you're sure to love---"Alabama Jubilee"


    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  13. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Is that James Burton on guitar there?
    one of the first solos i learned note for note-- always thought it was roy because he played similar stuff elsewhere and earlier. but i also know some folks have claimed that it was james burton. i'm not sure if the session logs would be helpful here or not. and it may not matter-- it could easily be james burton playing a solo close to what roy had been playing. or vice versa.

    i know clint learned roy's solo off of honky tonk night time man note for note, because he plays it right here in a clinic at a jazz school back in the 1980s. pretty funny-- the backing trio has been shredding on the standards, but they totally gank a simple 12 bar in G.

    he plays it with and without the band. i also highly recommend number 6 in this series of youtube videos, another part of the clinic where clint talks at length about work process with merle.


  14. #113

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    Clint Strong's a monster.

  15. #114

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    Yeah, i think that Clint was perfect for that band at that time-- they were tremendous live. Of the two live performances I got to see, I liked the band better with Clint than with Brent Mason, even though Brent is an amazing player.

    I'm also a big James Burton fan, and I do know that he played on a bunch of those Haggard sides in that earlier period. And his guitar absolutely makes Suzy Q.

    just saw the heavy metal thread, so this seems appropriate. prolly get me banned. heh



    i actually really like this album. took DAC to help me appreciate Dime.

  16. #115

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    How about more cowboy storytelling? Tom Russel's latest 'cowboy opera' "The Rose of Roscrae", tells the story of the last days of the old west through fictional Irish immigrant Johnny Dutton a.k.a. "Johnny Behind-the-Deuce".

    A short list of guest artists: Maura O'Connell, Joe Ely, Dave Olney, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Gretchen Peters, Eliza Gilkyson, Jimmy LaFave, Augie Meyers, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Ian Tyson and Johnny Cash (old recording).


    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...hQRw5i_0zOJ6Gq

  17. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxTwang View Post
    How about more cowboy storytelling? Tom Russel's latest 'cowboy opera' "The Rose of Roscrae", tells the story of the last days of the old west through fictional Irish immigrant Johnny Dutton a.k.a. "Johnny Behind-the-Deuce".

    A short list of guest artists: Maura O'Connell, Joe Ely, Dave Olney, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Gretchen Peters, Eliza Gilkyson, Jimmy LaFave, Augie Meyers, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Ian Tyson and Johnny Cash (old recording).


    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...hQRw5i_0zOJ6Gq
    Thanks for the tip---I'd never heard of this.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  18. #117

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    yeah, i hadn't heard the new tom russell. that's great. who'd have thought there was another billy the kid song to write?



    likely to be my new favorite tr lp

  19. #118

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    How about some Albert Lee on "Luxury Liner" ?

  20. #119

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    If you're thirsting for more Albert Lee, check this beauty with Roseanne Cash. played in "C".

  21. #120

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    these guys are nashville regulars. dig both the bass and guitar solos on this one


  22. #121

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    Blue Rodeo. I've seen these guys described as 'country', 'psychedelic country', 'alt country', 'country rock', etc.


  23. #122

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    Lucero, alt-country-rock, and sometimes soul, from Memphis. Ben Nelson writes some really good lyrics. After listening to their entire catalog it becomes apparent just how good these guys are.






    Last edited by MaxTwang; 01-23-2016 at 02:19 AM.

  24. #123

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    i dig lucero. amazing how many really good bands there are out right now, writing good songs, doing great live shows, not getting playe don the radio. a new golden age, although you'd never know it from the AMFM.

    i know lots of the jazzers here wish they could be in NYC or at least SF or LA to be on top of all the post-bop, but when it comes to live music, i'm usually wishing i was in Texas. I've still never seen this guy play, even though he's one of my faves and on the road right now.

    this tune always makes me homesick.


  25. #124

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    Speaking of Texas and current artists, here's a couple putting out good music. klk is correct, the fringe of country music has some really good artists right now.

    Hayes Carl has puts out some really good music and has a sense of humor at times - you gotta like a guy who writes "boy you ain't a poet, you're just a drunk with a pen".






    I caught Kacey Musgraves on Austin City Limits last year, I would consider her mainstream country and a good singer/songwriter who put on a good show.



    Last edited by MaxTwang; 01-23-2016 at 02:22 AM.

  26. #125

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    Used to hear on "Imus in the Morning."

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  27. #126

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    I suppose it appropriate to 'the perfect country and western song'

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  28. #127

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    Fans of the old program "Austin City Limits" know this song...

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  29. #128

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    and where in the world is that english girl, i promised i would meet on

    and yeah luv me some hayes carl. his song with corb lund, she left me for jesus, is hilarious. corb lund is another fave, but this seems like a pretty hip (if small) crowd, so i'm guessing everyone here already knows him.

    if we haven't already lost the OP, this one might complement the welch/rawlings style. i don't usually like hipster remakes of old music, but sean hayes's alabama chicken LP is an exception. and all of his years in the carolinas give him some cred for me.


  30. #129

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    Here's "She Left Me For Jesus"

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  31. #130

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    love that song.


    and as long as it's gospel hour:


  32. #131

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    If my scheme to convert Las Vegas to funk fails, and it probably will I'll get back into bluegrass, folk. I did a lot when I was starting. 'Country' mean commercial to me. I like this kind of stuff;



    I call it mountain music.

  33. #132

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Was listening to this which I found very beautiful. It was a student of mine who introduced me to the Gillian Welch/David Rawlings stuff....



    Also been listening to a bit of Tony Rice again recently - so many beast crosspickers out there, but Tony is so musical, and the voice (as it used to be....)

    Hit me up with some more stuff.
    Christian if you haven't already check out Grant Gordy's album and any of the recent Matt flinner trio I think you may like them.
    Listen to Grant Gordy by Grant Gordy on @AppleMusic.
    https://itun.es/gb/PDCtw

    Listen to Music Du Jour by Matt Flinner Trio on @AppleMusic.
    https://itun.es/gb/ephEs

    Listen to Winter Harvest by Matt Flinner Trio on @AppleMusic.
    https://itun.es/gb/VUj3C

  34. #133

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevebol View Post
    'Country' mean commercial to me. I like this kind of stuff: ....I call it mountain music.
    I feel the same way.
    Seems the "country" that gets heard at my home is mostly from the '20s and '30s.

    And I also think of it as "mountain music" - not that I know much about it - just that the contemporary stuff that generally approaches me wearing the "country" label sounds too commercial and cliched to be swallowed easily. So it's older stuff for me - and some of the "new" old stuff, under a more modern bluegrass label - and also I have been developing a warm taste for the unexpected (to me) southern blend of soul and country.

    As a cultural tradition alien to my own, it is still all pretty new to me, though, .
    So interesting to check out all these recommendations.
    Thanks.

  35. #134

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    Here's Blue Rodeo showing their psychedelic country side. I like that these guys play what they want, even if it doesn't fit country, or rock, radio format.




    Here's the official video, still good but has over 3 minutes cut out.

    Last edited by MaxTwang; 04-15-2016 at 01:19 PM.

  36. #135

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    I did not know James Burton played on Gram Parsons' solo albums--I thought it was Clarence White (who was a fellow Byrds alum and died just before they were going on tour). Al Perkins plays a mean steel guitar on those records as well.

    I saw Gillian and Dave a few years ago--phenomenal performance. Check this out:


    Watch what he does with the capo at ~1:44. I have NEVER seen anyone do that. One of the best flatpickers around IMO.

    If it hasn't been said before, here are quite a few others I like and have seen: Lucinda Williams, Old Crow Medicine Show, Old 97's.

    By the way, I love jazz, and it's about the only thing I can play reasonably well, but I really want to start an alt country band ala the Drive-By Truckers.
    Last edited by Doctor Jeff; 04-21-2016 at 05:41 PM.

  37. #136

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    Neat capo use indeed ^^^

    Here is some more neat capo use, a nice little trick which he does several times in the course of the tune - he doesn't start playing till around 1.15 or so btw if you want to avoid his rambling introduction -



    (Not meaning to derail the thread from country sounds btw, I just thought one good capo trick deserved another!)
    Spiderman needs no fancy suit or gadgets plus he's a jazz guitar fan

  38. #137

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    rip


  39. #138

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    Came across Pierce Edens music over the weekend, quite a voice! Here's 3 really good songs from his latest release (2012) that show some nice range.

    Pierce's music is based in folk and bluegrass from the Appalachians of North Carolina where he grew up, combined with the energy of punk he was exposed to in his teens.






    Last edited by MaxTwang; 05-18-2016 at 02:59 PM.

  40. #139

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    Time for another Tom Russell post. "Wounded Heart of America" is a collection of Tom Russel songs recorded by other artists, and a few recorded by Tom. Some great stuff here.

    Veteran's Day, Blue Wing, Gallo del Cielo, Manzanar and 'The Sky Above, the Mud Below' are stand-outs on this outstanding set.

    Here's a link to the playlist for the entire album.

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...dtPJZPkN8WcKVh
    Last edited by MaxTwang; 08-28-2016 at 08:09 PM.

  41. #140

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    Tony can do it all . . .



  42. #141

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    More of Tom Russell's incredible story telling - 'Manzanar'. Here's 3 artists (including Tom) telling the story, each bringing something a little different in their interpretation of the lyrics.







    Last edited by MaxTwang; 10-06-2016 at 07:44 PM.

  43. #142

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    Here's one from Dead Grass, a bluegrass band that played Grateful Dead and featured Vassar Clements (who worked with the Dead). Looks like the entire album is on Youtube, it's a pretty cool listen.


  44. #143

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    This song was referred to in a newspaper article I read this morning, so I've been looking forward to hearing it all day. Now's the time...

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  45. #144

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    This song was referred to in a newspaper article I read this morning, so I've been looking forward to hearing it all day. Now's the time...

    I'm sure you're familiar with this version;


  46. #145

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevebol View Post
    I'm sure you're familiar with this version;

    O, yes. That's the first place I heard it. As Bob Hope would say, "Thanks for the memory."
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  47. #146

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    For Veteran's Day, some Tom Russell.

    Thank you to all the vets and those in active service.