Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Posts 51 to 100 of 146
  1. #51

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by klk View Post
    and another for the road. 1949 was indeed a good year. anyone know who plays guitar on this cut? i know he played with a number of folks over the years, not sure who this is. from before his years at King.




    and for contrast, eddy rockin out in his Dwight days on the same classic.

    Just a wild guess on the guitar player. Thumbs Carlille?

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

    User Info Menu

    Ricky Nelson's version with none other than James Burton playing some tasty country formations of "A", "D" and "E7"

  4. #53

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by max chill View Post
    Yes, and we have Ms. Jones covering a Hank Williams tune from the best selling Blue Note album in history.


    To prove she was a real Texas girl, she, tele virtuoso Jim Campilongo, and company put together an act named after the red headed stranger, The Little Willies....just to prove they were the real deal.



    Who knew so many jazz forumites were closet shit kickers..?
    Love to hear Norah Jones sing. Didn't know about The Little Willies---that's a hot act!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  5. #54

    User Info Menu

    There was some sort of Playboys reunion on TV in the 80s where Shamblin takes at least one outrageous solo. I've tried to find it since but haven't. Willie Nelson and George Strait came out and did a tune or two. Willie did Milk Cow.

  6. #55

    User Info Menu

    that'd be cool, i haven't seen that one. post it if you find it. the willie version of milkcow i have the band is basically copying eldon's arrangement.

    i know this one with eldon and benny garcia. pretty tasty. and you can hear eldon's comping pretty well.


  7. #56

    User Info Menu

    Another example--he sings the theme to "True Grit" and then the guitar solo… I don't like the tone, but the solo has some truly great ideas.


  8. #57

    User Info Menu

    Don't leave out Jimmy Bryant!

  9. #58

    User Info Menu

    A taste of Eldon Shamblin and Herb Ellis doing "There Will Never Be Another You"

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  10. #59

    User Info Menu

    And one of a Herb Ellis' last albums was "Texas Swing"
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  11. #60

    User Info Menu

    Interestingly, "My Bucket's Got a Hole in It" is credited to Clarence Williams, an early jazz and blues pianist, composer, and A&R man, though Williams may not have written it. Williams played with Louis Armstrong, Bessie Smith, and many others.

    It is on of a number of country classics that were originally African-American.

  12. #61

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    And one of a Herb Ellis' last albums was "Texas Swing"
    Willie Nelson plays on "America the Beautiful" on Herb Ellis' Texas Swing

  13. #62

    User Info Menu

    Tom Russell writes some fantastic lyrics with great storytelling.



  14. #63

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by KIRKP View Post
    Don't leave out Jimmy Bryant!
    and the tradition continues.....


  15. #64

    User Info Menu

    This is a time capsule tune. A pairing of two of the most important figures in American music. The father of modern country music and the father of the jazz solo.


  16. #65

    User Info Menu

    A little late to this party, but here's a few.


    What good country singing can sound like.

  17. #66

    User Info Menu


  18. #67

    User Info Menu

    I love the Glen Campbell version of Ain't No Sunshine--surprising tone from that goofy guitar. IMO, like Jerry Garcia, he had poor taste in guitars. He should have stuck with Teles and archies.

    Now for a few Lucinda clips featuring (I think) Stuart Mathis:





    And a Lucinda song played by Blake Mills, one of the most interesting guitarists out there--I saw him with Lucinda a few years ago, will see him solo in April opening for Mumford and Sons:


  19. #68

    User Info Menu

    Who can forget the Joe Pass / Roy Clark project doing Hank Williams tunes? Here's "Cold, Cold Heart"

    Last edited by MarkRhodes; 01-09-2016 at 09:41 PM. Reason: spelling
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  20. #69

    User Info Menu

    "Spaghetti Western Swing"----

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  21. #70

    User Info Menu

    Glen Campbell was a ferocious talent, even from his Wrecking Crew credentials alone.

  22. #71

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Who can forget the Joe Pas / Roy Clark project doing Hank Williams tunes? Here's "Cold, Cold Heart"

    ...
    WHY DOES THAT GUY TALK OVER JOE PASS's SOLO????

  23. #72

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Who can forget the Joe Pas / Roy Clark project doing Hank Williams tunes? Here's "Cold, Cold Heart"
    seriously, can you just imagine soloing, and the guy who is feeding you the chords is JOE PASS! Wowsers!

  24. #73

    User Info Menu

    Some Scotty Anderson---man, can this guy tear it up!

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  25. #74

    User Info Menu

    Scotty in a jazzier vein
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  26. #75

    User Info Menu

    for folks with some jazz background, one of the real sweet spots in country music is guitar comping with texas fiddle. jerry thomasson's tenor playing behind his dad, benny,was a revelation to me way back in the 70s when we were passing around bootleg cassettes of the weiser reunion.

    voyager has it available on CD now, but none of it is up on yootoob. but here's is some of jerry's comping behind a couple fiddlers that aren't his dad.


  27. #76

    User Info Menu

    Sometimes 4 strings is all you need. I knew a bass player that used to kid 5 and 6 string players with 'what do you have all those strings for? You only need 3.'

    How do you think that tenor guitar is tuned? I think there's more than one way.

  28. #77

    User Info Menu

    i think jerry usually tunes a fifth below the fiddle, CGDA. i know some tenor guys will drop an octave below the fiddle.

    i'd love to have a tenor, but haven't played them often. my first teacher was actually a tenor banjo guy from the golden age in chicago. he also played the tenor guitar, so i got used to hearing it and playing with it, but i was strictly a 5 string player at the time.

    willie taylor plays tenor pretty much all the time-- good songrwiter from out round oakdale.


  29. #78

    User Info Menu

    I'm not familiar with the tenor guitar much. It seems like a great comping instrument though as is the uke. I believe
    Tiny Grimes tuned his like the top 4 strings of a standard guitar.

    Is that Oakdale, Calif you refer to? It looks like CA from some of the video shots.

  30. #79

    User Info Menu

    Larry Collins went on to write the hits Delta Dawn and You're The Reason God Made Oklahoma.

  31. #80

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post

    Now for a few Lucinda clips featuring (I think) Stuart Mathis:
    Actually this guitarist is wiz Doug Pettibone.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doug_Pettibone

    Moving on, I guess this tune by The Hellecasters gives a hint that badass John Jorgenson would go gypsy...





  32. #81

    User Info Menu

    of any music style 90 percent is rubbish 10 percent is gold

  33. #82

    User Info Menu

    This topic's got me nostalgic - I've gone and been and dug up some Buck Owens on the Interwebs:



    Dad used to listen to him on Radio Wewak in Papua New Guinea when we were there before Independence. I always loved that steel playing, likewise the fiddle playing. As you can hear, the guitar playing wasn't anything exciting. To be fair, is was better on some of his gospel songs, like this one:

    Last edited by Sandaun; 01-12-2016 at 05:17 AM. Reason: additional info

  34. #83

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandaun View Post
    This topic's got me nostalgic - I've gone and been and dug up some Buck Owens on the Interwebs:
    O, man, Buck Owens!

    First, the instrumental "Buckaroo"


    and then one of my favorite among his many hits

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  35. #84

    User Info Menu

    One of my top-ten favorite country songs

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  36. #85

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    O, man, Buck Owens!

    First, the instrumental "Buckaroo"


    and then one of my favorite among his many hits

    An early instrumental by the Buckaroos , featuring Don Rich.


  37. #86

    User Info Menu

    Here's Jackie Phelps , a Starday recording artist back in the day ! Note the thumb-pick and index finger pick !


  38. #87

    User Info Menu

    Thanks for the correction on Doug Pettibone. I should know that, since I have most of Lucinda's albums. When I saw her she had Blake Mills as her guitarist--Doug must have been on vacation.

  39. #88

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mrcee View Post
    Is that Oakdale, Calif you refer to? It looks like CA from some of the video shots.
    yeah, oakdale has a decent scene. willie has a farm there, but soda gardocki lives nearby. i saw bill kirchen at the cow track a couple years ago.

    he did the thing where he finished the last set by walking round the bar playing the trombone. great gig. bobby showed up and played steel. nice guy, too. one of the local kids brought him a tele to sign.

    this is video (not mine) from the year before


  40. #89

    User Info Menu

    I saw Kirchen a couple of years ago at the Freight and Salvage in Berkeley. I didn't know much about him but it was a great show. Was that Bobby Black on steel? A tremendous player with a great history.

  41. #90

    User Info Menu

    O.K. fellow pickers, here's a re-mastered "Pickin' Peppers" from Speedy West and Jimmy Bryant.


  42. #91

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mrcee View Post
    Larry Collins went on to write the hits Delta Dawn and You're The Reason God Made Oklahoma.
    Hadn't thought of "Delta Dawn" in years. I remember when this was a huge hit. I always liked the gospel feel of the chorus---talk about a hook!

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  43. #92

    User Info Menu

    Can't forget Loretta Lynn....

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  44. #93

    User Info Menu

    No you can't. This might be her first hit. It's a good one whenever it came out.


  45. #94

    User Info Menu

    This came late in her career, a duet with Jack White, and it is quite a feat.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  46. #95

    User Info Menu

    mcree--, yeah bobby black.

    this is a cool thread. when i started out, all the local guys played either like jackie phelps (archtop and travis pickin, not his hambone schtick) or don rich (tele, picked hard through a twin).

    and i really liked that jack white loretta album, too. good on that guy for doin that project. i actually kind of like his own version of "jolene," too.

    so many good women artists right now, and almost none of them on the radio. brennen leigh's new lefty album is great. this is from the new eilen jewel


  47. #96

    User Info Menu

    Last edited by rabbit; 01-13-2016 at 05:25 PM.

  48. #97

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by klk View Post
    mcree--, yeah bobby black.

    this is a cool thread. when i started out, all the local guys played either like jackie phelps (archtop and travis pickin, not his hambone schtick) or don rich (tele, picked hard through a twin).

    and i really liked that jack white loretta album, too. good on that guy for doin that project. i actually kind of like his own version of "jolene," too.

    so many good women artists right now, and almost none of them on the radio. brennen leigh's new lefty album is great. this is from the new eilen jewel

    Talking of Jackie Phelps , here's "Function At The Junction" from an old Starday LP. Apologies for the scratchy sound, but it's that or nothing !



  49. #98

    User Info Menu

    More Tom Russell

    The Rose of the San Joaquin was produced by Dave Alvin and Greg Leisz who also play guitar, slide, steel, mandolin, etc. on the album. Great writing and tasteful playing.

    Last edited by MaxTwang; 01-14-2016 at 02:20 PM.

  50. #99

    User Info Menu

    ranger doug! hard to believe a guy with that many strombergs could be so nice. years ago, a friend of mine booked them into a nice public theater in a town filled with retirees. they had to go light on the "limp rope" jokes and drug references. killer trio.

    and rose is one of my favorite tom russell tunes. saw him years ago in this tiny place out in the middle of the desert. he had a great flat picker whose name i can't recall right now. and then, in between his sets, this scraggly guy got up out of the audice of maybe 20 and did a set-- it was steve young. had no idea the dude was even alive. he did lonesome, onry and seven bridges and a few more i forget. great night. nice folks.

    here's steve backed by a young junior brown


  51. #100

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by klk View Post
    ranger doug! hard to believe a guy with that many strombergs could be so nice. years ago, a friend of mine booked them into a nice public theater in a town filled with retirees. they had to go light on the "limp rope" jokes and drug references. killer trio.

    and rose is one of my favorite tom russell tunes. saw him years ago in this tiny place out in the middle of the desert. he had a great flat picker whose name i can't recall right now. and then, in between his sets, this scraggly guy got up out of the audice of maybe 20 and did a set-- it was steve young. had no idea the dude was even alive. he did lonesome, onry and seven bridges and a few more i forget. great night. nice folks.

    here's steve backed by a young junior brown


    That Steve Young is some good stuff.

    Yes, Tom Russel is quite a talented song writer; I was listening to his 'cowboy operas': "The Man From God Knows Where" and "Hotwalker" today ("Hotwalker" is a trip, but also a captivating piece on post WWII American culture). What an amazing storyteller, I have the 3rd in the trilogy "The Rose of Roscrae" arriving Saturday.
    Last edited by MaxTwang; 01-15-2016 at 01:10 AM.