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  1. #201

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    and now a message from king charles ie charlie morris



    cheers

    ps- really quite a spectacular track..just the title!!..but has some real nice bop cuts mixed with future really nasty link wray-isms..classic
    Last edited by neatomic; 10-16-2015 at 08:16 PM. Reason: ps-

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #202

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    You better believe it!

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  4. #203

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    Pulled out and listened to a Memphis Slim CD while fixing dinner for the family this evening.


    Here's one of my favourites again - Matt "Guitar" Murphy:




    Last edited by TOMMO; 10-17-2015 at 03:13 PM.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  5. #204

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    And since we have a lot of variety here this may fit in as well (shameless vanity self plug):










    edit: I don't know why this has been titled "The Stumble" - it''s actually Freddy King's "Sidetracked"....
    Last edited by TOMMO; 10-17-2015 at 03:28 PM.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  6. #205

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    Was thinking of Magic Sam earlier today and had to listen to this.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  7. #206

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    The 45 of Freddie King's "Hide Away."
    I've heard a lot of people play this and most of them--though great players otherwise--don't do a good job with it. I'm not sure why but I think it's that they don't pay enough attention to the groove....





    Let's hear Billy Butler on Bill Dogget's "Honky Tonk" again while we're at it....

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  8. #207

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    Here's Bill Dogget's version of "Night Train." Not my favorite one but not bad either....

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  9. #208

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    Seeing these 45s reminds me of my first record player. My sister got it new, then my older brother had it, and eventually it found its way to me....
    It looked a lot like this (though the color was more of a light green):

    Attachment 24298

    My first guitar cost 25 dollars, a Harmony.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  10. #209

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    Jeez Mark, your bringing back long forgotten memories.

    Thanks!
    "Ahhh - those Jazz guys are just makin' that stuff up!" - Homer Simpson

    "Anyone who understands Jazz knows that you can't understand it. It's too complicated. That's what's so simple about it." - Yogi Berra

  11. #210

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    It's Chuck Berry's 89th birthday. Started a thread on that topic but thought a song of his belonged here too---let's go with "Johnny B. Goode."
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  12. #211

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    Often imitated, never equaled. Introduced to many an aspiring guitarslinger the hitherto alien landscape of the key of Bb. A people's poet, wielding a nineteen syllable line to create compact, resonant tales. Happy birthday, Mr. Berry!
    Best regards, k

  13. #212

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    Not strictly Jump, but you can hear its roots in this track (nice bounce):


  14. #213

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    Okay, this is a thread about jump blues. I get that. That's the main focus. But not all great jump tunes are blues tunes. Many were what Mickey Baker called "vamps". (In general, two 8-bar sections, a bridge, and another 8-bar section, totaling 32 bars. The rhythm changes are like that but not all vamps are rhythm changes, either.) I think it's important to have some such tunes up one's sleeve. For one thing, the same sort of lead playing tends to work. (You have to 'make the changes' but the solos tend to be riffy and swinging, with lots of hot licks---in other words, fun for the player and for the audience!)

    Here's a Louis Jordan classic that I've been working with this morning. (I assume that's Carl Hogan on guitar...)

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  15. #214

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    Are all these songs about food? Lol. Check out a song called "Angelo's" on YouTube. Same style and progression. It's by a guy named Dick Siegal. It's used for a long running radio program called " Sunday Morning Over Easy". WCSX Detroit.

  16. #215

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    Quote Originally Posted by douglas View Post
    Are all these songs about food? Lol. Check out a song called "Angelo's" on YouTube. Same style and progression. It's by a guy named Dick Siegal. It's used for a long running radio program called " Sunday Morning Over Easy". WCSX Detroit.
    Hhm, food... There is Louis Prima's "Banana Split for My Baby"



    And here's another Louis Jordan classic that BB King often played too, "Let The Good Times Roll." (<<<Lots of people have done this and it works with a variety of crowds; it's a good tune to know.)

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  17. #216

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    I heard this growing Louis Jordan classic while growing up. My mom played it on her piano and sang it. I've always dug music that moved like this (-and also funny / clever lyrics, but that's another thread).




    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  18. #217

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    A lesson on how to play "T-Bone Shuffle" (-the rhythm part.) I don't think this is exactly how T-Bone played it but this is a good thing to know because you can use it as a rhythm part for other tunes, or as a "groove riff" chorus at the start of a longer solo.... (This could also be an "ensemble riff" like Charlie used to play with Benny Goodman.)

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  19. #218

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    I'm working on a Duke Robillard solo called "Duke Jumps the Blues." It's from the book he did with Dave Rubin (-see link below.) It's a good book, by the way. Duke plays long solos in several styles. Some are based on his own originals ("Fishnet", "Memphis Grind", "Swingin' With Lucy Mae") while others are not. "Duke Jumps the Blues" is in Bb at a tempo of 193 bpm. In the performance notes, Duke says he uses the first (root) position of the composite scale for most of it.

    I wasn't sure what "composite scale" meant. I had to Google it. But when I saw what it was (1 2 b3 3 4 b5 5 6 b7), I said, "Oh, that." I don't think much about scales when I play, other than the major scale / cycle.

    Does anyone here (-esp in relation to jump blues and related genre)?

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/063...s=books&sr=1-1
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  20. #219

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    That's a Swiss army knife of a scale Mark. Can't go wrong with a major, minor, Dom. Dim. Flat 5 scale lol.

  21. #220

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    I love the t-bone lesson. I've been getting into the jump blues lately. Mark Wein has a nice solo lesson for this rhythm in the same group of Truefire lessons you quoted earlier " The Pulse". It's # 5.

  22. #221

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    Quote Originally Posted by douglas View Post
    That's a Swiss army knife of a scale Mark. Can't go wrong with a major, minor, Dom. Dim. Flat 5 scale lol.
    +1
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  23. #222

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    Such a great thread! Outstanding music, have to go back and work through every single clip.

    Thank you Mark R. for bringing in Alex Schultz. These two of his just get it:

    Doing Jimmy McGriff's All About My Girl



    Hot Wheels


  24. #223

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    I agree 100%!

  25. #224

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    Some Duke Robillard....

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  26. #225
    I'm not sure but I know Roy Nichols from Merle Haggard played some early sessions with the Maddox Brothers. I know he was inspired by Junior Barnard and it's safe to say if any Maddox recording sounds like Junior odds is it was Roy. This cut has some great lines definitely a hillbilly take on some Charlie Christian runs.

  27. #226

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    Too many pages to check, but I don't think we've had this one yet:


  28. #227

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    that maddox brothers guitar solo sounds a lot like the later guitar work of paul burlison/grady martin? with the johnny burnette trio!..

    cool track

    cheers

  29. #228
    I think it has phrasing more in line with Hank Garland or Thumbs Carlisle. Check this one out boys.

  30. #229

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy Harkenrider View Post
    I'm not sure but I know Roy Nichols from Merle Haggard played some early sessions with the Maddox Brothers. I know he was inspired by Junior Barnard and it's safe to say if any Maddox recording sounds like Junior odds is it was Roy. This cut has some great lines definitely a hillbilly take on some Charlie Christian runs.
    Just a guess but I'd go with Roy Nichols especially if it was cut in California. Nichols and the Maddox Brothers were all from the San Joaquin Valley.

  31. #230
    Here is another fun one today. I've been into the French Blues pickers. I think there is something special in how they swing and phrase.

  32. #231

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy Harkenrider View Post
    Here is another fun one today. I've been into the French Blues pickers. I think there is something special in how they swing and phrase.
    Didn't know there was a 'blues pickers' scene in France! When I'm in a 'ch-easy listening' mood I put on Serge Gainsbourg (the above vid reminded me a little of his Jazz output).

    As a kid in the '70s I was dragged along to see Mr Hulot's Holiday at the local Art House cinema. Loved the incidental music:



    Stuck in my mind for the rest of my life (film and music).

  33. #232

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    Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup talking about a baby who's got no hair.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=OPFMdOp4Fmo
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  34. #233

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  35. #234

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    ^ One of my favourite Gainsbourg tracks. Just dig the bass line. And an early appearance by Austin Powers in the background!

  36. #235

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    Just found out Duke Robillard's tune this month at Sonic Junction is Bill Jennings' "Glide On." This week, the chords, and some comping ideas. Next week, the head.

    Blues Legend Duke Robillard
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  37. #236

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    More Alex Schultz. Duke Robillard posted this on his Facebook page. Alex will be playing with Duke on his (and his band's) upcoming two-week European tour.

    Duke has had rotator cuff trouble--I think he had surgery and has been recovering for awhile now. I'm not sure if he's back to 100 % yet....

    Lot of bebop quotes in these solos!

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  38. #237

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    yeah, you can do worse than use parker heads as solos. i finally started listening to it w/ watching cuz i kept getting distracted by all his switch flipping.

    just came across this -- missed it when it came out. since we've al;ready done saunders king and t-bone, here's one of my other favorites.


  39. #238

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    Quote Originally Posted by klk View Post
    just came across this -- missed it when it came out. since we've al;ready done saunders king and t-bone, here's one of my other favorites.


    Thanks for that! I love "Get Rhythm". I like Johnny's version better---it rocks!---but this is a good groove too. That's a tune I've never found my own way with. This could give me some ideas....
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  40. #239

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    yeah, it got me playing get rhythm again. and wanted man.

    btw, you or someone else upthread mentiong the weidlich book on t-bone and charlie christian.

    i have it. haven't worked through it entirely yet, but it's interesting although pretty idiosyncratic. it takes off from that last section in his book on charlie's chord shapes, where weidlich talks about charlie's roots in country blues and the mechanics of his playing. this new book seems to be aimed at an audience of jazz guitarist who are already reasonably comfortable with basic theory but have never had any real exposure to the blues. he spends a lot of time working carefully through explanations of hand position, the mechanics of bending, etc. for folks already familiar with blues playing styles, that section will seem weirdly remedial. but maybe lots of folks learning jazz guitar now don't start with blues?

    that's followed by a lot of detailed discussion of basic t-bone licks. and then some useful transcriptions of 3 versions of flying home, including 2 airshots, one of the songs that isn't included in ayeroff's big book of cc transcriptions. i haven't checked weidlich's transcriptions against the recordings yet. but he also has a brief transcription of oscar moore that looks accurate. and lots of interesting examples of the places in various solos where charlie actually bent notes.

    then the appendix has another brief historical essay on the origins of r&b and a section adapting barrelhouse piano to guitar. that bit seemed like something weidlich just had sitting around. since bending is the central motif of the book-- t-bone did a lot, charlie did a lot less-- i'd think that lester young would be a more obvious comparison. but of course, any of us interested in that-- or in doing something similar with, say oscar moore's work --still can.

  41. #240

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    Quote Originally Posted by klk View Post
    yeah, it got me playing get rhythm again. and wanted man.

    btw, you or someone else upthread mentiong the weidlich book on t-bone and charlie christian.

    i have it. haven't worked through it entirely yet, but it's interesting although pretty idiosyncratic.....
    Thanks for the lowdown on that book. I'll get to it one of these days...
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  42. #241

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    nice blues from helen humes, fresh from basie band..1946 on the aladdin label..lester young's on the session, but the interesting bit is dave barbour featured on guitar..he was married to peggy lee, at the time...his tone reminds me of django a bit..and he gets plenty of blowin time

    Jump Blues-dave-barbour-peggy-lee-1-t690f25g10-jpg





    cheers

  43. #242

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    Here's Dave Barbour with Peggy Lee, the version of "Why Don't You Do Right" from 1950. (She sang it earlier with Benny Goodman.)


    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  44. #243

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    i dig barbours tone on that one too..he's the 1/2 speed django..(one fingered django hah)

    cheers

  45. #244

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    Here's a clip of Peggy Lee with the Dave Barbour Quartet performing "Why Don't You Do Right" in 1950. Not sure whether it is really live or synced. Lots of shots of Barbour playing, regardless.


  46. #245

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Elliott View Post
    Here's a clip of Peggy Lee with the Dave Barbour Quartet performing "Why Don't You Do Right" in 1950. Not sure whether it is really live or synced. Lots of shots of Barbour playing, regardless.
    Nice. Thanks.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  47. #246

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    cool live clip...barbour has a van eps string damper...has to be one of the first, as van eps patent was 1950..same year as clip..and also shortly before barbour and lee split up..they had met while both were in the benny goodman band

    Jump Blues-vanco02-jpg


    cheers

  48. #247

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    since i mentioned django's tone, via barbour..here's django -amped-with ellington 1946..blues riff indeed



    cheers

    ps- great pic

    Jump Blues-image399__700-jpg
    Last edited by neatomic; 11-13-2015 at 07:38 PM. Reason: ps

  49. #248

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    since i mentioned django's tone, via barbour..here's django -amped-with ellington 1946..blues riff indeed
    Sounds good! Not what I'm used to hearing from Django, but there's a nice bite in it. ;o)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  50. #249

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    Some tasty Oscar Moore

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  51. #250

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    A young George Benson doin' it live.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola