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  1. #101

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    "The Nightcat Boogie" (live) by Little Charlie and the Nightcats. Love the "Chattanooga Choo-Choo" quote....


    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    In a different vein, Oscar Moore's "Walkin' Home."

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  4. #103

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    I don't think we've heard from Ike Turner yet....

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  5. #104

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    Oscar and Nat telling us it is "Better To Be By Yourself." (This is one of the best clips of Oscar playing that I have seen.)



    Does this lyric remind anyone else of the juvenile limerick that begins, "There once was a hermit named Dave..."?
    Last edited by MarkRhodes; 10-01-2015 at 07:55 PM. Reason: Additional comment
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  6. #105

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    All aboard---the night train! (Not my favorite version but still fun.)

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  7. #106

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    Not exactly jump but here's Herb Ellis tearing it up with Oscar Peterson on "Naptown Blues."

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  8. #107

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    An hour (near enough) of Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown doing his thing live.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  9. #108

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    The guy who introduces Gatemouth refers to Loyola---I'm thinking this is the Loyola on St. Charles Ave. in New Orleans (-and not the one in Chicago).
    I think that's Joe Krown on the keyboards. (Joe is a New Orleans staple and if you're into organ-trio sounds, he's got some good 'uns.)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  10. #109
    Hey boys! Just signed up on this thread and am really happy to be here. Can't go wrong when talking about Oscar Moore and Mickey Baker!

  11. #110

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy Harkenrider View Post
    Hey boys! Just signed up on this thread and am really happy to be here. Can't go wrong when talking about Oscar Moore and Mickey Baker!
    O, man, are you THE Tommy Harkenrider? You could school us all!
    I recently wrote to Matt (Matthieu) Brandt and asked him for a list of must-know jump tunes and he gave me a nice one. If you had to list four-five (or more) tunes that someone should know before sitting it a jump jam session, what would they be? Just curious....
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  12. #111

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    One of my favorite Guitar Slim recordings, "I Done Got Over It." I'm not sure he even plays guitar on this one---or anyone else does for that matter--but it's a gospel-infused hoot and a great vocal.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  13. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy Harkenrider View Post
    Hey boys! Just signed up on this thread and am really happy to be here. Can't go wrong when talking about Oscar Moore and Mickey Baker!
    What took you so long! We've been admiring your yootube vids. Great stuff, nice to see you here.

  14. #113

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    One of my favourite musicians. Not really jump, but a nice atmospheric boogie bass line...plus the vocal line when it comes in is so laid back:


  15. #114

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    Louis Jordan doing "Caldonia" (-I think the correct spelling is "Caledonia"). BB King did this, and also "Let the Good Times Roll," which Louis Jordan also did (before him). Did BB do anything else Louis Jordan had done? Just curious...


    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  16. #115

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    I've always loved "Rocket 88" and see no reason not to enjoy it again. ;o)

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  17. #116
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    O, man, are you THE Tommy Harkenrider? You could school us all!
    I recently wrote to Matt (Matthieu) Brandt and asked him for a list of must-know jump tunes and he gave me a nice one. If you had to list four-five (or more) tunes that someone should know before sitting it a jump jam session, what would they be? Just curious....
    LOL! You are way to nice. I love all the posts. I'm seeing tunes that I have never heard before. What a great question. I'll put some thought into this. There are very few songs that I remember learning note for note, but I remember learning Tiny's Tempo, Honey Boy(Billy Butler), Stompin with Bill, and Jackson's nook. I must use lead and comping ideas from all those songs all the time. I'm so happy to be on board with you boys.

  18. #117

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    funny!!..been lookin all over u-tube to post teddy bunn's "jacksons nook" ..but nowhere!!..absolute killer..

    and by way of history-

    jacksons nook was san francisco club..run by caribbean couple who made great "soul" food..so all the musicians playin' the then very happening fillmore area would head there between and after sets..to eat!..but they'd eventually start to blow..and it became the hip behind the scenes playin' scene..kerouac immortalized it in "on the road"..callin it "jam"sons nook! genius!

    hah!! got it..listen-

    http://www.phantomsofsoul.com/78samp...nsNookmono.mp3

    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 10-01-2015 at 09:34 PM. Reason: sp

  19. #118

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    Here's "Honey Boy"

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  20. #119

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    And here's a YouTube clip of someone playing Billy Butler's part...

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  21. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Louis Jordan doing "Caldonia" (-I think the correct spelling is "Caledonia"). BB King did this, and also "Let the Good Times Roll," which Louis Jordan also did (before him). Did BB do anything else Louis Jordan had done? Just curious...
    B.B. King devoted an entire album to Louis Jordan "Let the Good Times Roll." The 1999 album featured Dr. John, Hank Crawford, Fathead Newman, Earl Palmer, and Russell Malone on rhythm guitar.

    It is quite possible that B.B. King did other LJ tunes at other points in his career.

  22. #121

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Elliott View Post
    B.B. King devoted an entire album to Louis Jordan "Let the Good Times Roll." The 1999 album featured Dr. John, Hank Crawford, Fathead Newman, Earl Palmer, and Russell Malone on rhythm guitar.

    It is quite possible that B.B. King did other LJ tunes at other points in his career.
    Thanks! I had no idea. I'd like to hear that record.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  23. #122

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    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  24. #123

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    A short demonstration of the "flat tire" rhythm central to this style.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  25. #124
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    funny!!..been lookin all over u-tube to post teddy bunn's "jacksons nook" ..but nowhere!!..absolute killer..

    and by way of history-

    jacksons nook was san francisco club..run by caribbean couple who made great "soul" food..so all the musicians playin' the then very happening fillmore area would head there between and after sets..to eat!..but they'd eventually start to blow..and it became the hip behind the scenes playin' scene..kerouac immortalized it in "on the road"..callin it "jam"sons nook! genius!

    hah!! got it..listen-

    http://www.phantomsofsoul.com/78samp...nsNookmono.mp3

    cheers
    That is a great story. I love this thread, thanks for sharing this! I'm a huge Teddy Bunn fan. I love everything he did. The stuff with Hadda Brooks is really cool.

  26. #125

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    funny!!..been lookin all over u-tube to post teddy bunn's "jacksons nook" ..but nowhere!!..absolute killer..

    and by way of history-

    jacksons nook was san francisco club..run by caribbean couple who made great "soul" food..so all the musicians playin' the then very happening fillmore area would head there between and after sets..to eat!..but they'd eventually start to blow..and it became the hip behind the scenes playin' scene..kerouac immortalized it in "on the road"..callin it "jam"sons nook! genius!

    hah!! got it..listen-

    http://www.phantomsofsoul.com/78samp...nsNookmono.mp3

    cheers
    I listen to a lot of 30s and 40s Swing. That track you posted is killer. The inherent swing in the phrases (of all the musicians featured) is so typical of musicians back then...very few play with that type of swing feel nowadays. It makes you want to dance.

    Bit too early for this thread, but I love The Spirits of Rhythm. Especially Leo Watson's scat singing.

  27. #126

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    Pee Wee Crayton doin' the "Huckle Boogie"

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  28. #127

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    J. B. Hutto doing "I Feel So Good." (Not exactly jump but I figure if you don't like this, you don't like ice cream, and what can you say about a person like that?)

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  29. #128

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    There's no happier music than jump blues. Taj Mahal did a great cover of Blue Light Boogie.


  30. #129

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    Quote Originally Posted by KIRKP View Post
    Taj Mahal did a great cover of Blue Light Boogie
    That's a nice version. I've sometimes felt that Taj's music is overproduced and it used to put me off his music. However, in the late 80s/early 90s I took a gamble and saw him live. He was outstandingly good; one of the best gigs I've ever been to. Yet the album he was promoting still lacked something...I wish he'd find other producers.

  31. #130

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Quite a few sides on that list that I didn't know. Worked through much of it on youtube, and it's more the Rock & Roll side of Jump. Not that that's bad or anything (I love Rockabilly), but I prefer Jump stuff with more of a R n B tinge.

  32. #131

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    Not a jump record per se, but I think a jump band could make this work for them. (A guitar can play the main riff in double stops...)

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  33. #132

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    That was a great Pee Wee track Mark. Spent the last hour listening to him. These two fit the Jump category:








    The second one has a tone that could cut through barbed wire!

  34. #133

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    Amos Milburn doing "One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer."



    And here's "Down the Road A Piece."



    And here's a tutorial of the bass line from "Down the Road A Piece."

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  35. #134

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    Ray Benson -- Choo Choo Chaboogie

  36. #135

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    Some more Jimmy


  37. #136

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    BB's "You Upset Me Baby" is one of my favorite performances by BB. I did not know Louis Jordan had done it!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  38. #137

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    BB's "You Upset Me Baby" is one of my favorite performances by BB. I did not know Louis Jordan had done it!
    No - I meant to say "Buzz Me" is a Louis Jordan tune that B.B. did (couldn't find his version on yt) and while searching came across "You Upset Me" which is a favourite of mine.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  39. #138

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    No - I meant to say "Buzz Me" is a Louis Jordan tune that B.B. did (couldn't find his version on yt) and while searching came across "You Upset Me" which is a favourite of mine.
    Got it! I hadn't heard "Buzz Me." Fun tune.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  40. #139

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    Here's our own Tommy Harkenrider playing over a rhythm changes backing track he made. Three things about this: 1) his playing is great and I think everyone following this thread will enjoy it; 2) Tommy's clearly a 3-finger player (for the most part); 3) jump blues often follows a 12-bar format but there's no reason for a jump player to shun rhythm changes! ;o)

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  41. #140

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    httj-

    cool you mention gypsy jazz, cause so many of those double stops and slurs came via django..who because of his 2 finger "handicap", really had to "cheat"! haha…such a cool free sound, guys picked up on it..carl hogan, t bone w, les paul..

    chuck berry!

    keith nabbed it off chuck..but if you have ever seen the chuck film with keef..he was no scholar!! haha..much as i dig keef…and i do! raw guts n vibe is good too!

    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 10-04-2015 at 11:25 PM.

  42. #141

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive View Post
    Keef is killing it! I haven't heard that many double stops in a guitar solo since... ever! He's got that Chuck Berry thing down very well!

    Speaking of double stops, I think it's safe to say them are one of the prominent elements of the style? 3rds, 4ths, diminished 5ths, on the treble strings- so cool, so meaty. I plug those licks in Gypsy jazz, straight ahead, even polkas... I'd get vibes sometimes, lol, but to me it adds some nastiness to a solo!
    Yeah, Keef was workin' 'em allright. Is that a Firebird he's playing?

    I love double stops too. If you check out the tutorial on the boogie / bassline of Amos Milburn's "Down the Road a Piece", you'll hear lots of double stops.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  43. #142

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    Here's B.B. doing "You Upset Me"



    Sounds like a "Modern" recording for the Bihari Brothers. It's also on "Live at the Regal," iirc.

    And, from left field, here a western swingish version by Red Smith, also from 1954 shortly after B.B. wrote and recorded it.


  44. #143

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    I follow a posting on Facebook called " Jump-Blues Killer Guitars. I think anyone can join. They post videos like these everyday. I saw Barney Kessel playing jump. It was very cool. Charlie Christian too. I don't know how to post videos.

  45. #144

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Elliott View Post
    Here's B.B. doing "You Upset Me"
    Yeah, that was my intro to the tune.

    Here's another fave from that era, "Beautician Blues."

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  46. #145

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    Quote Originally Posted by douglas View Post
    I follow a posting on Facebook called " Jump-Blues Killer Guitars. I think anyone can join. They post videos like these everyday. I saw Barney Kessel playing jump. It was very cool. Charlie Christian too. I don't know how to post videos.
    I joined that group too, though I spend more time here than on Facebook. (About all I do there is play Words with Friends.) I have seen some gems, though.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  47. #146

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    Speaking of the Facebook group, here's something posted there just now. Louisiana Red's "Who Dat?"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=53&v=bRUnlNoG7W4
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  48. #147

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    TOMMO, thanks for the Little Walter clips. Love to hear him play.

    Here's an article from "Guitar World" that applies his soloing style (on the harmonica) to guitar....

    Talkin' Blues: Little Walter's Exciting Up-Tempo Jump-Blues Soloing Style | Guitar World
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  49. #148

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    Welcome! Love Little Walter.

    To my knowledge he was heavily influenced by sax players and strived to emulate their sound....
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  50. #149
    Our buddy JBYORK sent me message asking about the Mickey Baker book, specifically the later lessons. He asked me if I can shed some light on some of this. I'll get a little video up here in the next day or so. Long story short is Mickey's methodology is pretty consistent for players of his his generation. He uses chord arpeggios as reference points or grips. He gets a little fancy by using V-minor chords as I-dom7th sub. he also uses 6th minor arpeggios for Imajor chords. Those two tricks are really effective. Okay, the G13b5b9 lol!! is nothing more than an altered V chord in the Key of C. Truth is take a C major and move it up a half step minus the 13th that is what a G13b5b9 is, what a mouthful. I like the book definitely a good book to keep plugging your way through. Not a lot of instruction but useful ideas. Believe me the first time I went through this book I didn't know what the heck he was talking about. Every year now that I review this stuff it makes more sense. If anyone has questions on this book don't hesitate to ask me. Like I said I'll get a little video up in a day to illustrate some of these techniques. Picture is worth a 1000 words. As far as other books I like the Barney Kessel book, I've heard great things about the herb ellis book as well.

  51. #150

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy Harkenrider View Post
    Believe me the first time I went through this book [Mickey Baker's volume 1] I didn't know what the heck he was talking about. Every year now that I review this stuff it makes more sense. If anyone has questions on this book don't hesitate to ask me. Like I said I'll get a little video up in a day to illustrate some of these techniques. Picture is worth a 1000 words. As far as other books I like the Barney Kessel book, I've heard great things about the herb ellis book as well.
    I go back through that book too. Our own fep has a thread devoted to the Mickey Baker book, where he posts videos of the lessons. (So far, I think they've all come from the first half of the book.)

    Here's a link to the thread.
    Mickey Baker Course 1, mp3's and videos

    Which Barney Kessel book are you talking about? I haven't seen any of his books. (I know there are a few but I'm unfamiliar with them.)

    As for the Herb Ellis books, I have the three he did late in his life (Swing Blues, Rhythm Shapes, and All the Shapes You Are.) I'm up for any questions anyone might have about those books. They're pretty much my daily bread!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola