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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    I dig the way Duke arranged the horn section for guitar on this recording. Haven't found out how to do it yet:
    Ah, "Jumpin' Blues." That's one of the tunes Duke teaches at Sonic Junction.

    The opening chord sequence is: F F7 Bb6 Bbm6 F C7 F F7, which seems simple enough, but he voices each of those F (and F7) chords a different way! It creates a nice movement.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    how about some pee wee crayton!…dig this A side from 1954…opening riff remind you of anything??…haha



    pee wee also got in on the hucklebuck thing..the huckle boogie



    one of junior watsons favorite guys


    cheers

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Ah, "Jumpin' Blues."
    Composed by Jay McShann and Charlie Parker.

  5. #54

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    mcshann so very undervalued!!..and hip!….thats st.louis bird..a kid!

    cheers

  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    how about some pee wee crayton!…dig this A side from 1954…opening riff remind you of anything??…haha
    I expected the answer would be Chuck Berry---and there is a family resmeblance---but the first association to hit me was, "My, God, that's the intro to the Beatles' 'Revolution'!"
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  7. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Elliott View Post
    Composed by Jay McShann and Charlie Parker.
    That's an unusual tune in that the first chorus doesn't include the head! And the head itself sounds like a backing riff. But hey, it works!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post

    The opening chord sequence is: F F7 Bb6 Bbm6 F C7 F F7, which seems simple enough, but he voices each of those F (and F7) chords a different way! It creates a nice movement.
    That's it: the chords are pretty obvious but he plays them through different inversions and changes position which makes it interesting (and tricky)!
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    That's it: the chords are pretty obvious but he plays them through different inversions and changes position which makes it interesting (and tricky)!
    Right. But like other people who comp well, especially those doing anything in the Swing vein, he has his favorite moves. For example, he likes a voicing he calls the "gospel" chord and it looks like this (-let's say in F, the key of "Jumpin' Blues"):

    8-x-7-10-x-x

    You'll notice that the 5th is in the bass and that the root is the top note. It's a simple triad. But it's a nice voicing for swing-style comping and it blends with with other ones for creating a bass line OR for creating a nice inner-line. For example,
    if you play two beats of F this way, then an F7 voiced as 8-x-7-8-x-x, then a regular Bb6 followed by a Bbm6, you have a nice movement in the top line. Freddie Green did that sort of thing all the time.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  10. #59

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    Thanks Mark - I'll give that a try.

    I've watched Duke play this tune and he plays those opening chords on the first 5 - 6 frets though.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  11. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    Thanks Mark - I'll give that a try.

    I've watched Duke play this tune and he plays those opening chords on the first 5 - 6 frets though.
    The way he plays it here (-Sonic Junction) is 'down there' much of the time too, though he says if it's all down there it gets too muddy. The head is played at the low end, though it's on the top three strings (-for the most part).
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  12. #61

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    Who's up for some Bill Jennings and Jack McDuff doing "Glide On"?

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    The head is played at the low end, though it's on the top three strings (-for the most part).
    Yes that's the way I've seen him doing it.


    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Who's up for some Bill Jennings and Jack McDuff doing "Glide On"?

    One of my favourite twofers (two original albums on one CD): Bill Jennings and Brother Jack McDuff!


    Keep 'em coming!
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Here's a lesson in jump blues comping by Tommy Harkenrider. I really enjoyed this one. (I don't know Tommy and haven't bought any of his lessons, but this is a nifty quick lesson in comping.)



    thanks for this little Gem, Tommy Harkenrider is my guitar instructor and I've not seen this one before. I'll be working on it all day between pedal builds.

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shamblin View Post
    thanks for this little Gem, Tommy Harkenrider is my guitar instructor and I've not seen this one before. I'll be working on it all day between pedal builds.
    It's a nifty lesson. The basic comp is fun---and flexible---but I need more work to pull some of the lines out of it that he does.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  16. #65

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    You may enjoy this short lesson on blues comping by Kirk Fletcher:



    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    You may enjoy this short lesson on blues comping by Kirk Fletcher:
    Whoa! That's hot stuff. I know some of those moves but certainly not all of them. That 'tremolo strum' is so cool!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  18. #67

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  19. #68

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    Ah, thanks for Teddy Bunn. "Edgar's Boogie" is a good 'un.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  20. #69

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    swingin killer guitar driven instro from johnny otis and his orchestra....guitar is pete "guitar" lewis..with ben webster on tenor sax...johnny o on vibes! cut in L.A. december 26, 1951 for mercury records




    cheers

    ps- pic of pete guitar lewis with jo horns..wailin an epiphone

    Jump Blues-petelewisu002528betteru002529-jpg
    Last edited by neatomic; 09-25-2015 at 06:30 PM. Reason: sp-

  21. #70

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    I have to learn some of these tunes.

    What sounds like a good starter-set of jump blues tunes to you guys?
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGerry View Post


    great track..guitar showcase..you can hear bunns guitar needs some bridge work…his note starts sitaring at one point!! hah..great octal tone

    cheers

  23. #72

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    Some Illinois "Texas Tenor" Jacquet, from 1942

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  24. #73

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    A little Ruth Brown would not be out of place here.....

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  25. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    A little Ruth Brown would not be out of place here.....

    obvious that louis armstrong had huge influence on her...

    he was the alpha... everyone else the omega

    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 09-27-2015 at 11:15 AM. Reason: clarity

  26. #75

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    Let's not forget this guy here:








    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  27. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    Let's not forget this guy here: [T-Bone Walker]
    Love T-Bone. He's harder to emulate than one might think: He really mixed up his rhythms!

    Another guy we can't forget is Freddie King. Perhaps not jump blues per se (-I think he's generally thought of as Texas blues), but what jump band doesn't do at least one Freddie King instrumental?

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  28. #77

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    Freddy King: probably my main man when it comes to blues lead guitar! Learn his instrumentals and you have a tool box full of licks and lines that you can use!
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    Freddy King: probably my main man when it comes to blues lead guitar! Learn his instrumentals and you have a tool box full of licks and lines that you can use!
    I love his playing too. (Eric Clapton once said that his soloing was mainly a matter of shuffling Freddie King licks around---and I think Eric is a great blues player.) Such strong rhythmic drive and those stinging licks!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  30. #79

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    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  31. #80

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    raucous 1948 bay area jumper from roy hawkins..who wrote the thrill is gone! i.e. bb's hit!

    skullsplitting guitar work from super obscure ulysses james



    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 09-27-2015 at 12:11 PM.

  32. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    raucous 1948 bay area jumper from roy hawkins..who wrote the thrill is gone! i.e. bb's hit!

    skullsplitting guitar work from super obscure ulysses james
    Thanks! Never heard that one before.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  33. #82

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    A lesson teaching 5 ending licks for a jump blues. Nice.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  34. #83

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    I favour No.s 3 and 5 - bit of a bebop flavour - I'll have to learn those and apply them to the R&R tunes we play in the band. The others aren't shabby either but I'm quite familiar with them. No.4 for example sounds like the intro to a Hollywood Fats Band recording (I think "Rock This House"?).

    Thanks for the clip, Mark!
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  35. #84

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    This is a plug for a book / poster about jump blues players. I have no affiliation with the book. Some nice snippets from players we haven't yet mentioned, so it's worth a look / listen.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  36. #85

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    A lession (via guitar.com) by Charlie Baty of Little Charlie and the Nightcats.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  37. #86

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    Back to the classics....

    Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis "Ravin' at the Haven" (1947)



    And Jimmy Rushing doing "Mr. Five By Five."

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  38. #87

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    Amos Milburn doing the "Chicken Shack Boogie"



    Bull Moose Jackson doing "Shorty's Got To Go"

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  39. #88

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    Loved Ravin' At the Haven. Anything with hand claps is going to swing it for me. Simple, rhythmic phrasing during the sax solo...wonderful stuff!

  40. #89

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    Lockjaw also put me in mind of this famous solo.



    By the time you get towards the end, it's jump. The power of the riff.

  41. #90

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    some nice cal green nastiness- huffin & puffin…indeed



    cheers

  42. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarGerry View Post
    Lockjaw also put me in mind of this famous solo.



    By the time you get towards the end, it's jump. The power of the riff.
    I used to listen to a jazz show that sometimes opened with this. Love it.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  43. #92

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    as per that jump blues book...forgot about wild jimmy spruill!! ..


    killer stuff



    cheers

    ps- how great is willie dixon in that matt murphy clip?!!


  44. #93

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    About that Jimmy Spruill clip above, "Scratchin'." That opening bass-line riff sounds a lot like the "What'd I Say?" bassline.



    Speaking of Ray, this is a less well known tune but it's a hoot nonetheless


    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  45. #94

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    Anyone know who the guitarist is on "It Should Have Been Me"?
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  46. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Anyone know who the guitarist is on "It Should Have Been Me"?
    the great mickey baker!
    Jump Blues-101420370_135415612083-jpg

    cheers

    ps- always liked the commander cody live version on we've got a live one here

    <em>
    Last edited by neatomic; 09-29-2015 at 11:40 PM. Reason: ps-

  47. #96

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post

    ps- how great is willie dixon in that matt murphy clip?!!
    He had great feel, a great voice and wrote some killer songs. When you listen to his bass lines though, sometimes he plays for a whole 12 bars on the I chord. On those occasions, he sometimes outlines the IV too, but if it hadn't been for his pianists, slamming out the harmony, a lot of his recordings wouldn't have worked so well. He even played guitar like that. There's a clip of him on youtube singing a 12 bar, making changes with his vocal lines, but only playing around the I chord. Personally, I don't give a damn, it works for me...funny though.

    If you're not aware of them already, there's a whole series of blues festival DVDs featuring all the greats of the 60s. Well worth watching (most of the clips on youtube are taken from that set, plus one DVD of 'British tours').
    Last edited by GuitarGerry; 09-30-2015 at 07:03 AM.

  48. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    the great mickey baker!
    Jump Blues-101420370_135415612083-jpg

    cheers
    Neat! Thanks.

    Here's Mickey with the "Spinnin' Rock Boogie"
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  49. #98

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    Speaking of Willie Dixon, how on earth did we forget the Big three trio!








  50. #99

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    not jump per se, but boss instro from the great jody williams…played on so many classic chicago blues tracks ala willie dixon


    lucky lou





    cheers

  51. #100

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    More Mickey Baker...




    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola