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  1. #51

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    Jaco

    Thank you for your original "Gypsy Jazz" post- I was so happy to see Django lovers here! My husband, Bob, and I are coming to Gypsy Jazz from jazz, swing, bossa nova, and originals, and were surprised to find out how hard this style is to learn! It was like learning guitar all over again from scratch-different guitar, pick, technique, rhythm, etc. We have about 7 tunes so far, and learning more…I bought Bob a used (one previous owner) Maurice Dupont M-50. It came with nice low action, easy to play, with a Big Tone installed. I had Maurice Dupont make me a Jaques Favino copy, but without the 3- piece neck. I had him build me a thinner neck, to fit my hand, and also had him install a Big Tone pick-up. It is so loud, I have to turn down when we are plugged in! We live in the Santa Cruz Mountains, south of San Francisco, and I haven't found any one local who could teach me the correct La Pompe rhythm. We drove up to the Djangofest in Marin, and attended a workshop with Robin Nolan which was helpful. I know there are tons of lessons, DVD's, youtube videos, etc. out there, but I like the "teacher to student" approach myself. I figure this will help me avoid bad habits, and hopefully get me into good technique from the get go. We just finished a "masterclass jam" with Dorado Schmitt and his group
    at the SF Jazz center last week. Paul Mehling's group performed there, that afternoon, and he came in towards the end of the class. We are going to set up some lessons with him. I know you are suppose to play this style with feeling, and of course, swing! I'm just into good technique on guitar, so I am probably not alone, expecting to get this style down in a short amount of time-it is just so different than "American" style jazz! I imagine a lot of guitar players have gone through the same thing…
    In case any one new to Gypsy Jazz wants to know about Django, Gypsy Jazz, players, Paris clubs, etc these books were great:

    Django - The Life and Music of a Gypsy Legend by Michael Dregni
    Gypsy Jazz - In Search of Django Reinhardt and the Soul of Gypsy Swing by Michael Dregni
    Last edited by Michelle; 11-21-2014 at 07:40 PM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michelle View Post
    Jaco

    Thank you for your original "Gypsy Jazz" post- I was so happy to see Django lovers here! My husband, Bob, and I are coming to Gypsy Jazz from jazz, swing, bossa nova, and originals, and were surprised to find out how hard this style is to learn! It was like learning guitar all over again from scratch-different guitar, pick, technique, rhythm, etc. We have about 7 tunes so far, and learning more…I bought Bob a used (one previous owner) Maurice Dupont M-50. It came with nice low action, easy to play, with a Big Tone installed. I had Maurice Dupont make me a Jaques Favino copy, but without the 3- piece neck. I had him build me a thinner neck, to fit my hand, and also had him install a Big Tone pick-up. It is so loud, I have to turn down when we are plugged in! We live in the Santa Cruz Mountains, south of San Francisco, and I haven't found any one local who could teach me the correct La Pompe rhythm. We drove up to the Djangofest in Marin, and attended a workshop with Robin Nolan which was helpful. I know there are tons of lessons, DVD's, youtube videos, etc. out there, but I like the "teacher to student" approach myself. I figure this will help me avoid bad habits, and hopefully get me into good technique from the get go. We just finished a "masterclass jam" with Dorado Schmitt and his group
    at the SF Jazz center last week. Paul Mehling's group performed there, that afternoon, and he came in towards the end of the class. We are going to set up some lessons with him. I know you are suppose to play this style with feeling, and of course, swing! I'm just into good technique on guitar, so I am probably not alone, expecting to get this style down in a short amount of time-it is just so different than "American" style jazz! I imagine a lot of guitar players have gone through the same thing…
    In case any one new to Gypsy Jazz wants to know about Django, Gypsy Jazz, players, Paris clubs, etc these books were great:

    Django - The Life and Music of a Gypsy Legend by Michael Dregni
    Gypsy Jazz - In Search of Django Reinhardt and the Soul of Gypsy Swing by Michael Dregni
    I think there's a practical short-cut to this- Robin Nolan's chord voicings and Denis Chang's rhythm technique. Here's Denis. He's self-taught and very good at the pomp;



    This DVD will show you how to do the pomp. Denis knows how to break it down. It's pretty easy to learn but also easy to forget;

    Denis Chang DVD (All regions) JAZZ MANOUCHE: THE ART OF ACCOMPANIMENT - DjangoBooks.com

    Robin Nolan ha a number of books and I like his voicings. It's basically 3-4 voice chords.

  4. #53

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    ^^^
    I have a bunch of his books. Don't know if his chords are 'authentic' but they sound good to me. Just one of his books will give you an good idea of his system with chords. It's actually pretty simple.

  5. #54

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    Stevebol

    Thank you! Of course that is what I should do! Duh…Ha! Michael Horowitz (Djangobooks) shipped us our guitars-
    He suggested Denis on the phone, as husband Bob was looking for some transcriptions of Django solos, and Michael said Denis used to have several on his website. I guess it was too time consuming for him, so he took them off…
    Bob and I will order his DVD, and also Robin Nolan told me that he and his brother have a new rhythm DVD, just out.
    That should help a lot…Thank you also jbyork!
    Bob and I are just about to rehearse "Bossa Dorado"

    Thanks again!

    Michelle

  6. #55

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    ^^^
    Not to knock Denis on soloing but his instruction with 'The Art of Accompaniment' is particularly good. He really has the right-hand motion down and knows how to teach it. As far as soloing you can get that from any number of places but the rhythm technique is hard to come by. There might be one other person who teaches it.

    I don't have loads of books like some others but I found Chang's rhythm and Nolan's chord voicings to be good combo.
    Once you get the rhythm down everything falls into place I think.

    Nolan creates a kind of chromatic movement on the low E string with the way he voices his chords. I think it's a nice effect. I haven't seen Nolan's DVD on rhythm. Maybe he expands on varlations of the basic rhythm.

    I don't like recommending DVD's and books unless they address something simply and directly. Chang and Nolan just happen to do that with some of what they offer.

  7. #56
    Michelle, thank you for your post. I didn't expect the kind of response for this thread we have here. A Dupont is on my wish list. I recently bought a used Altamira as I wanted to make sure this was a direction I wanted to go. I'm sure now. Headed to Samois next year. You are lucky to have Paul for a teacher his DVDs are excellent. Pick Power is a great right hand workout. I recently played in a clinic with Frank Vignola and take some lessons with Larry Coryell who recorded an album with Stephan Grappelli (Young Django, I believe). These one on one lessons with great musicians are invaluable. Wish you and everyone who tackles this great music the best.

  8. #57

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    Stevebol,

    Thank you so much for this info! Husband Bob and I will order these this weekend- I love adding anything "jazzy" to this Gypsy Jazz guitar style, such as a walking or moving bass line, chromatic movements within the chord, holding a chord while moving just one note up or down, chord extensions, etc…the Gypsy players seem to do all this within the Gypsy Jazz style. Have you seen "Michael Horowitz- A Tutorial for Gypsy Jazz Rhythm Guitar"? This is a big 280 page spiral-bound book that is wonderful- CD examples, in 10 parts, pictures, notation, transcriptions, the works! We just worked up "Bossa Dorado". I'm able to do the "Gypsy Bossa" rhythm just fine. We love that song! It sticks in your head…
    Since I am new to this forum (just joined a few days ago, Bob joined last night), do you have any samples of your playing? I would love to hear it! I get the feeling that a lot of people are reluctant to post their playing …I will always encourage players to do this…there is a lot of positive support here-I think a little encouragement goes a long way with
    musicians. Bob and I will post "Corcovado" somewhere in the "Jazz" section…I would love to hear the music of the members here! Why not share our love of Guitar? All of this feedback inspires me to play! There is a growing Gypsy Jazz community in the US and, it seems world-wide. This thread could attract a lot of Gypsy Jazz players! Bob and I will be active on several threads, there is so much here to learn…We love our "American" Jazz, our vintage jazz guitars, songs, gigs etc… but playing Gypsy Jazz on a Gypsy style guitar is so much darn fun!

    Thanks again for all the helpful info.

    Michelle

  9. #58

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    jaco

    Wow! I'm scared of you! Ha! Frank Vignola and Larry Coryell? What did you cover in that clinic? Where was it ,and who attended? Sounds really cool…I am jealous you are going to Samois! Husband Bob and I are going to Paris this coming fall, for our wedding anniversary. I intend to take Paris by storm! First stop will be Francois Charles' shop, then Cafe Voltaire, Montmartre, and lots of Gypsy Jazz clubs! I can't wait! When it comes time to fly out ,I hope to have some "music introductions" by players- Bob and I should be able to jam with people over there…A lot of players go over every year for touring, festivals or gigs. Lots of "American" jazz in Paris too! Please post a tune on this thread, if you want…
    if you haven't yet. I would love to hear you!

    Michelle

  10. #59
    Michelle, Frank's clinic was here in Florida at a Festival called Riverhawk. It's a four day festival with camping and a variety of musical styles mostly acoustic. He emphasized playing horizontally, practicing scales on one string etc. Larry lives about 15 minutes from my house. I've been working with him close to two years. He really is into improvising on tunes. Segovia scales, blues, and hard work. He's always telling me "this isn't easy, you have to put in the time". He has some amazing stories and has played with everyone from Hendrix (they were good friends, both from Seattle) to Miles. I'm not very computer literate but will try to get something up if I can figure out how. Old school, may get a cell phone this year.

  11. #60

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    jaco,

    Thanks again for responding...

    My dad and his wife, lived in Homosassa, Florida for 2-3 years. Husband Bob and I went to visit them, and stayed at their house for about 3 weeks. We visited the Homosassa Springs Wild Animal Park and saw the manitees, then drove to Tarpon Springs (the Greek community), and had Greek food. This was about 10 years ago…
    We loved Florida! The Riverhawk Festival looks like a lot of fun- quite an eclectic group of artists played on the bill, according to the website. Must have been fun camping out…
    I love to read and learn, so I look everything up, and do my own "research". I wanted to do my homework before I responded to your post- Larry Coryell is an interesting man. According to wikipedia, he played with Chico Hamilton and Gary Burton in New York-did a lot of acoustic guitar duets, and formed The Guitar Trio in 1979 with John McLaughlin and Paco de Lucia. He recorded and hung out with Emily Remler before she died. Have you checked her out? She is happening! He wrote a book, out in 2007, which I'm interested in reading. Wasn't he sort of a bridge between "straight-ahead" jazz and the beginning of "fusion"? Bob has some of his CD's…I also love Jimmy (Hendrix). It says Frank Vignola worked a lot as a sideman in the 1980's, then signed with Concord Jazz. I guess he has 18 instructional guitar books and CD's out. He has a CD called "Blues for a Gypsy". His current guitar is interesting…a Ryan Thorell arch- top FV studio model (sunburst). I am really into guitars! It has a really slanted pick-up. jaco- definitely get a cell phone! It will come in handy in an emergency…You certainly hang out with some heavy weights! How nice to learn from Larry Coryell, and have him as a friend! I'll tell you later who I recorded with in LA… Michelle
    Last edited by Michelle; 12-09-2014 at 02:53 PM.

  12. #61
    Michelle, My wife and I almost bought a place in Homassassa, but went with Cedar Key just north of there. I had a cool gig at the Island Hotel sitting in with a great piano player named Joel Benefiel who passed away recently.
    Larry's bio is a very good read, he's met or played with about anyone you can think of from the 60's to present. He's a great teacher and very encouraging. My first lesson I mentioned the album with he and Emily, and he said "let's play something off of it". I was scared to death but had been working on "How Insensitive" and somehow got through it. We later worked on Joy Spring. I'm not as familiar with Frank but he has a great video performance DVD called Gypsy Jazz with Jimmy Rosenberg that you would enjoy. I think you said you and your husband had recently bought Dupont guitars. I've read nothing but great things and am interested in one next year, but will probably wait till after Samois so I can try out as many as possible. You mentioned some recording in L.A. Would love to hear about it. Mike

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by JSanta View Post
    I also have to plug a local group that I like very much. They are starting to get some international buzz. John Larson is including them on a compilation album being put out next year.

    www.ultrafaux.bandcamp.com
    I just got around to listening to this... incredible! (Probably the best name for a gypsy group I've ever heard, too.)
    Jay

    'boobadoobadoobaooababop!'

  14. #63

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    jaco-
    Thanks for your response! A few things I want to mention:
    I can't believe you and your wife were almost neighbors of my dad and his wife in Homasassa! Have you been to see the mantinees? Were you and the piano player playing jazz? Emily R. is still online-you can take a jazz lesson from her, even though she is gone! Very weird, but she was so hip-I wish I could have seen her live…she recorded a lesson on a cool way to practice with the metronome, to make your phrasing really swing. Husband Bob and I also do "How Insensitive" , such a beautiful melody! I have tried to do a nice chord arrangement (bossa) for it. I love The Rosenberg Trio! I think Bob and I will order that Frank Vignola DVD you mentioned. About the Duponts- I bought Bob his Dupont MD-50, with a Big Tone installed. I don't think you could go wrong with that-alot of the pros use it for their "work horse" gigging, recording axe. It came with low action, which Bob likes for lead. For my "Jacques Favino Custom", I worked closely with Michael Horowitz up in Seattle (Djangobooks). I was buying a custom guitar, (my very first Gypsy Jazz), and having it built from scratch, over the phone-sight unseen, and not being able to play it first! That was nerve-wracking! I did alot of research, knew exactly what I wanted, and worked with Michael to make it happen. I love it! It looks and sounds just like I imagined-I wanted a 1960's vintage Favino, but too risky to buy without playing first! Michael said there are alot of bogus people trying to sell "vintage" Gypsy Jazz guitars online…I assume you have researched alot, and know what you want? Keep looking at all the guitars Michael has on his website, and reading the descriptions of each one-that really helped me get familiar with the luthiers, the history, and the construction of the different makes. Michael describes the sound, and has a demo video of each one. For rhythm, I probably should have bought a "grand bouche", but I wanted a "petite bouche". I like a big body, with lots of bass and midrange, and a thinner neck-but that's just me. You will probably play lots of guitars at Samois-just be sure to get what is best for you! Michelle

  15. #64

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    I love hot club jazz.

    I did see a document about Django, when I was 16 year old or something. I did see there guys who were playing hot club style in park. I thought that time, that it would be my dream. To play good gypsy style in a park. Without entrance fee or nothing, only a small cup front of me and few other players. Just to be a small nice band in a corner of a sunny day. That band would give a little joy to the city and nice feeling to a ordinary day in summer.

    Django is the man to me. He's playing is more cheerful and natural than any players after that. For me also starting learning jazz guitar did happen on studying Djangos solos. I hope that i will collect much from Django.

    Right now I am just playing Djangos solos and try to copy licks and stuff. Hardest thing seems to me is to get away from scale kind of playing to more melodic chordal playing while improvising. Most important thing is to keep it flowing and keep it swing. Then after getting that every solo should have little bit of mountain tops where is good melodic idea and strong points.

    Just keep on practicing... I could take a nap and then start doing it.
    Last edited by Dexma; 02-27-2015 at 12:25 PM.

  16. #65

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    Check out Romane's book Le'Espirit Manouche. It's a pretty extensive study of gypsy playing(mostly lead playing). It's only like $25 on amazon and has a ton of content.

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by drbhrb View Post
    Check out Romane's book Le'Espirit Manouche. It's a pretty extensive study of gypsy playing(mostly lead playing). It's only like $25 on amazon and has a ton of content.
    I have actually read this book. Almost I could say many times.

    The melodic and solo ideas are pretty good in here. For all jazz guitarists and because of Romanes playing style in the book it sounds more "gypsy" than "jazz" many times. Its not so "hot-club style" to me. Also there is lot to read for rhythm guitar.

    If I listen my small songs and solos I can hear lots of licks from that book, but I have not done enough working with the chords and harmony what that book can offer... (also technique is faaaaaar away where i am right now....)

    There is little bit of what i am doing right now. I have put some latin style songs, some finnish folk songs (In finnish music there is a big influence coming out from gypsy minority) also some wannabee django style jazz.

  18. #67

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    Pretty good stuff there Dexma...love gypsy jazz.
    "Ahhh - those Jazz guys are just makin' that stuff up!" - Homer Simpson

    "Anyone who understands Jazz knows that you can't understand it. It's too complicated. That's what's so simple about it." - Yogi Berra

  19. #68

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    Hi friends

    I love music of Django & company

    I,m starting to study this style.....

    I work with Michael Horowitz gypsy picking and then with somes transcriptions.But they are very diffcult for me.

    I need help because I woul like to play easy melodies and I don,t Know where to start.
    I play exercises and arpeggios for technique.I would like play easy melodies

    Can anyone give me some advice please?

  20. #69
    I love me some Gypsy Jazz! My uncle was a WW2 vet and he was in France during the war and came to love Django and when I was a kid he gave me all his Django LP's back in the 1970's.

    Here is Frank Vignola & Jimmy Rosenberg ripping up in some hotel room in NYC.


  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jvilpaz View Post
    I need help because I woul like to play easy melodies and I don,t Know where to start.
    I play exercises and arpeggios for technique.I would like play easy melodies

    Can anyone give me some advice please?
    Here you are, my man:

    Django Fakebook (PDF)

    Also, look up Denis Chang's DC Music School, and download his free beginner's playalongs.
    Jay

    'boobadoobadoobaooababop!'

  22. #71

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    I just recieved Unaccompanied Django by Horowitz from djangobooks.com. Very well printed and edited book. The pieces are marked by complexity and there is a recording of each track.



    Unaccompanied Django - DjangoBooks.com

    l plan on adding some of these arrangements to my repetoire. This style has some steep learning curves, especially the picking technique. It's a great lesson when you have to go back and actively think of your picking hand just as much as your left hand.
    Attached Images Attached Images Gypsy Jazz-image-jpg 
    Seeking beauty and truth through six strings.

  23. #72

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    I have a few dvds. I bought Denis Chang's stuff, Paul Mehling and Stochelo Rosenberg. I recommend them all.

    Also, on youtube, there's a Django documentary titled La Vie Django. Its in French with English subtitles. Well worth watching.

  24. #73

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    I have a few of the Djangobooks publications and Michael has done an absolutely stellar job on them. His Gypsy Rhythm book is one of the most exhaustive resources on the technique ever produced and is enough to give guitarists something to work on for years and years.

  25. #74

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    Thanks for the great examples. I've been into Django since the 80's but I've never heard these other players. Cool!

  26. #75

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    Hi Guys, these fellas are great really worth checking out.
    Gonzalo Bergara
    Beniot Convert
    Adrien Moignard

    Also the youtube channel patrus53 is one of the best channels for gypsy guitar

    Pat

  27. #76

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    some different from Poland...:-)