Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Posts 26 to 50 of 53
  1. #26

    User Info Menu

    Right under our fingers all this time.


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by thelostboss View Post
    I am interested but need [or want] to upgrade my keyboard. I have a Kawai K5000W which has a real organ/synth feel to the key-bed and I have been thinking of getting the M-Audio Oxygen Pro 49 for a bit more dynamic feel to the keys. Open to advice/suggestions/well-meaning abuse on this topic before proceeding. 2B may be one who can give insight on keyboard "feel"!

    Cheers
    TLB, I can’t offer any suggestions on these keyboards. Personally I’ve only owned keyboards with weighted keys which attempts to replicate a piano’s action. Having come from actual pianos I prefer weight under my fingers. Sorry I can’t be of help.

  4. #28

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by JazzinNY View Post
    It seems like, with Yamaha and Casio, as you go toward $650, you get closer to a piano feel. E.g , Yamaha P-125.

    Or, you may be able to score a thrift shop upright.
    For $700 Yamaha has stuffed their P125 with weighted keys and all sorts of goodies. Years ago you couldn’t find weighted keys in a keyboard for anything less than $1800. Great value for the money.

  5. #29

    User Info Menu

    Here's the next progression and the backing track for you practicing pleasure is here (160bpm): Box

    I've taken to starting my practice with running up and down the 1 7 3 5 voicing in a couple of keys, then going thru exercise 3 & 4, and then playing the progressions on pg 21 and 22.


  6. #30

    User Info Menu

    Progress report: working through the chord scale for each key, moving in fourths. Today I did Gb. Wow, Db and Gb are black key-a-paloozas, to an extent you don't realize on guitar.

    The whole thing is dependent on how well you know the piano keys. Frustrating to still occasionally play a Db when wanted an Eb. Gotta just stick with it; it's much better than a few months ago. And as FEP says, sometimes you get happy accidents.

    Ergonomics: some shapes, like C to Bb (left hand) were giving me strain, like golfer's elbow. I was keeping pinky towards me. Now I'm pushing it into the sliver of white, even or above the thumb. Much better.

    I like to practice going up the scale just the outside notes (1, 7) and then just the inside notes (3, 5) and then put them together.

  7. #31

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by JazzinNY View Post
    Progress report: working through the chord scale for each key, moving in fourths. Today I did Gb. Wow, Db and Gb are black key-a-paloozas, to an extent you don't realize on guitar.

    The whole thing is dependent on how well you know the piano keys. Frustrating to still occasionally play a Db when wanted an Eb. Gotta just stick with it; it's much better than a few months ago. And as FEP says, sometimes you get happy accidents.

    Ergonomics: some shapes, like C to Bb (left hand) were giving me strain, like golfer's elbow. I was keeping pinky towards me. Now I'm pushing it into the sliver of white, even or above the thumb. Much better.

    I like to practice going up the scale just the outside notes (1, 7) and then just the inside notes (3, 5) and then put them together.
    Ha, I'm a golfer also, play once a week.

    Going up the scale with the 1 7 3 5... He's given us three voicings, 1 7 3 5, 1 3 7 9, and 1 5 7 3 (see page 10). I feel I need to start practicing the 1 5 7 3, he does mention in the book that you may want to run that up the scales/keys also, just one sentence and it's easy to miss. Probably the 1 3 5 7 would be useful also.

    Playing the progressions I sometimes feel like the jump resulting from a 1 7 3 5 to another 1 7 3 5 just doesn't sound great and it's useful to use other voicings.

    For example, the progression on page 21, C-7 F7 Bbmaj7 Em7 F7 Bbmaj7 A7. C-7 F7 Bbmaj7 is fine just the way we are learning but after that I'm wanting to figure out smoother chord to chord movement.

  8. #32

    User Info Menu

    Jerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-jpgJerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-b-jpgJerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-c-jpgJerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-d-jpgJerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-e-jpgJerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-f-jpg

  9. #33

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop View Post
    Jerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-jpgJerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-b-jpgJerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-c-jpgJerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-d-jpgJerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-e-jpgJerry Coker's Keyboard book, Interested in a Study Group-f-jpg
    Is that from the Levine book?

  10. #34

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    Is that from the Levine book?
    No, it's from Jamey Aerbersold's "ii-V-l" voicings, Volume 3. These are standard voicing's for both the right hand and left hand. Practice both hands independently or together.

  11. #35

    User Info Menu

    I propose that this be the Coker thread. If anyone wants to discuss Aebersold or Levine or anything else, make it a separate thread.

  12. #36

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by JazzinNY View Post
    I propose that this be the Coker thread. If anyone wants to discuss Aebersold or Levine or anything else, make it a separate thread.
    Yeah but,

    Those ii V I's are pretty much on topic in particular because Cocker keeps referring to the Abersold books and the ii V I book in particular.

    Still, that stuff is all on the back burner for me as Cocker makes a good argument for limiting the number of voicings we take on at first. I'll try to find that explanation in the book a bit later.

  13. #37

    User Info Menu

    Pages 23 & 24


  14. #38

    User Info Menu

    If you’re studying jazz piano the Aerbersold books are where it’s at. They’ve sold in the many hundreds of thousands. They’re a series of some 100 different books. The ii V l is the first to display jazz chords. The only thing better are Aebersold’s books which reveal his actual playing. Jamey plays sax, piano, bass, and a plethora of instruments.

  15. #39

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop View Post
    If you’re studying jazz piano the Aerbersold books are where it’s at. They’ve sold in the many hundreds of thousands. They’re a series of some 100 different books. The ii V l is the first to display jazz chords. The only thing better are Aebersold’s books which reveal his actual playing. Jamey plays sax, piano, bass, and a plethora of instruments.
    Cocker wrote in this book, "Aerbersold comps extraordinarily well, better than most pianists"

    I'm planning on taking the 1st pass through the book and then on the second pass through I'm going to add the Abersold books Cocker suggests.

    I found this online Abersold streaming site that I'll use (no room for more music books on my shelves, for that matter I have another three boxes full of books).

    https://streaming.jazzbooks.com/

  16. #40

    User Info Menu

    FEP: getting back to your postings from pages 21 to 24: they are lovely, but ...

    If this is going to be a group, it needs to have several people going thru the book at about the same pace. So maybe start a new thread for each chunk.

    I should be able to post something from about page 16, 17 this weekend or Monday. Two other guys have shown interest, but have keyboard issues.

    Pages 20 to 30 have A LOT of material.

    Then page 30 has a clear demarcation point, Blues and Rootless Voicings.

    Just a suggestion ... it's your baby.

  17. #41

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by JazzinNY View Post
    FEP: getting back to your postings from pages 21 to 24: they are lovely, but ...

    If this is going to be a group, it needs to have several people going thru the book at about the same pace. So maybe start a new thread for each chunk.

    I should be able to post something from about page 16, 17 this weekend or Monday. Two other guys have shown interest, but have keyboard issues.

    Pages 20 to 30 have A LOT of material.

    Then page 30 has a clear demarcation point, Blues and Rootless Voicings.

    Just a suggestion ... it's your baby.
    Sounds good, Page 25 will be a good spot to start the next section and then page 30 for a 3rd section.

  18. #42

    User Info Menu

    That’s why I posted those photos. Omit the bass note, lower the voicings an octave below middle C up to D a 9th above and you’ve got left hand rootless voicings including 9ths, b9, +9, +5, b5, and 13th’s. It’s nothing difficult for a jazz guitarist. Plus JA has a hip rhythm section to practice along with to get your timing down pat.

  19. #43

    User Info Menu

    I should be ready for Carnegie Hall soon.


  20. #44

    User Info Menu

    Or maybe the Blue Note ...


  21. #45

    User Info Menu

    Hey Alan, Great to see you posting.

    Your D G F A choice, kind of a mysterious modern-sounding chord. But in the sense that "modern chords" these days go back aways, Debussy perhaps.

    D F A is a Dm chord. I guess the G is an add 4, so Dm add4. Similar to the modal jazz tune, the names escaping me, that goes from Dm7sus4 and then modulates up a 1/2 step to Ebm7sus4. I think that voicing is D A C G A to Eb Bb Db Ab Bb.

    I'm guessing your elbow pain will eventually go away, at least for all but long sessions. I hope so.

  22. #46

    User Info Menu

    Yes I was thinking it's a modern sound too. Doing just a few R-4 breaks up the repetitive R-7.

    Apparently it's ulnar nerve pain, similar to golfer's elbow, underneath (whereas tennis elbow is on top). Just trying to manage it with moderation (guitar has brought it on too). I ordered a compression sleeve which supposedly may help.

  23. #47

    User Info Menu

    A quickie:


  24. #48

    User Info Menu

    Very cool Alan. This piano thing brings in a whole new set of discoveries.

  25. #49

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    For anyone out there without a keyboard, if you have a computer you can get into the world of keyboards very inexpensively. I bought the M Audio Keystation MK3 for $119 and I've seen it for $99. Added a $20 sustain pedal. I really like this setup.
    I wanted to be able to play anywhere around the house without being tied to a computer so I've just bought a standalone 61-key Casio CTS300 for c£140. There are cheaper options CTS100 (c£90) and CTS200 (c£120) but the 300 has touch sensitive keys which I thought was probably worth paying a bit more for. They're pretty decent no-frills fairly portable options for beginners and they can act as MIDI controllers although there's no software included. So I'm just starting on the Coker book too.


  26. #50

    User Info Menu

    Yes, James with the leather jacket! Cool guy, also the only guy on YouTube who waves his hands around more than me.

    Some of the Casio's have an amazing acoustic bass voice you can use as a split.

    Anyway, welcome aboard ... Looks like we have a group.