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  1. #1

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    Anyone ever get into Foghat?


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    yes

  4. #3

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    I’ve been known to take a Slow Ride from time to time…

  5. #4
    I liked 30 Days In The Hole by Savoy Brown I think. Similar English blues vibe rocked out.

  6. #5

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    Had this album when it came out and played it a lot. This was the biggie.


  7. #6

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    They had a concert on MTV many years ago in the infancy of MTV. I still remember the square guitar of the singer/guitarist and the bass player's headband. They were pretty high energy and had more than a few songs that I liked.

  8. #7

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    Foghat Live was often on the turntable back in these days.

  9. #8

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    I think Slow Ride was the first bass popping i ever heard on a rock song.

  10. #9

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    I think we have a lot of Old Hippies here on JGF.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    I liked 30 Days In The Hole by Savoy Brown I think. Similar English blues vibe rocked out.
    30 Days in the Hole is by Humble Pie (post Frampton).

    I never particularly got into Foghat, but they did a "Blues Tribute" concert ca. 1977 that I caught on TV at the time that got me into a bunch of songs, and Eddie Kirkland (who kind of stole the show).

  12. #11

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    a band that did not age well. Remember getting a cassette of Foghat live on my first Columbia house record club order in jr high. Just sounds like fake blues crap now compared to Allmans, ZZ Top or SRV

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    I think we have a lot of Old Hippies here on JGF.
    Play live . . . Marinero
    Foghat was a boogie band, not a hippie band!

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Foghat was a boogie band, not a hippie band!
    Hi. M,
    In my neighborhood in Chicago, we called that Hippie Music. So, for the sake of argument, what's Hippie Music? Hippie Music for me was everything outside of R@B/Funk/Soul and played by the suburban kids with long hair and blue jeans. Perhaps, too simplistic . . . but it worked for us. We rarely, if ever, heard that played in the clubs/bars in Chicago.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  15. #14

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    Too many Grateful Dead fans here for sure.

  16. #15

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    Foghat was part of the first concert I ever went to, back in about ‘74. They opened for James Gang during the Tommy Bolin era.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Had this album when it came out and played it a lot. This was the biggie.

    Back in the day I was very grateful to Foghat for getting Muddy Waters' music on the hit list, and hence into our performances. It was the thin edge of musical wedge that I drove ever deeper for as long as I could. First Muddy, then Wolf, then BB and Buddy and Freddie and Albert and the floodgates were pretty much history. When the Levee Breaks (McCoy)....

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    Back in the day I was very grateful to Foghat for getting Muddy Waters' music on the hit list, and hence into our performances. It was the thin edge of musical wedge that I drove ever deeper for as long as I could. First Muddy, then Wolf, then BB and Buddy and Freddie and Albert and the floodgates were pretty much history. When the Levee Breaks (McCoy)....
    Ditto. At that point I was already onto Muddy Waters, but Foghat's concert movie has Eddie Kirkland in it, a spectacular performer who turned out to be a regular at this club I walked past on my way to school. Caught him a bunch of times there.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    Ditto. At that point I was already onto Muddy Waters, but Foghat's concert movie has Eddie Kirkland in it, a spectacular performer who turned out to be a regular at this club I walked past on my way to school. Caught him a bunch of times there.
    Muddy, etal. were on my personal list since the mid-sixties. It was introducing them to the working-class folks who paid their dues to the clubs that hired us that took a little strategery!

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    I liked 30 Days In The Hole by Savoy Brown I think. Similar English blues vibe rocked out.
    30 Days was Humble Pie.

    Last edited by Doug B; 07-09-2021 at 04:29 PM.

  21. #20
    IIRC, they used mainly lower budget P90 guitars like LP juniors, specials, etc, instead of the usual Standards and Strats, and I thought that was cool.

  22. #21

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    Back in the day we used to call it Hard Rock--blues-based music full of power chords, generally with a hirsute and vocally uninhibited guy in the front.

    There were a lot of groups with a fair amount of talent that toiled in Led Zepp's shadow. This was one of them, along with Mountain, Free, Bad Company, Grand Funk Railroad, REO Speedwagon in their early days, even Jethro Tull and Deep Purple (though they had more success than Foghat).

    You could always do worse than blaring one of these songs on the 8-track out of your Mustang Fastback cruising the main drag for girls. Though at least in my era girls preferred Peter Frampton or the Eagles over power chords.

  23. #22

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    What are you guys talking about records and cassettes for?

    Foghat was 8-track music!

    .

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry
    What are you guys talking about records and cassettes for?

    Foghat was 8-track music!
    True that!

    8-track was big in the mid-70's. I had a stereo with an 8-track player--think it might have been a Jensen--for a year or 2, but then got interested in component systems and started going down that road of upgrading components bit by bit. I fortunately only accumulated about 20 8-tracks before moving on to mainly vinyl.

    I never had one in my car. Supposedly they broke down a lot. When I upgraded the stereo in my '77 Toyota Celica I made sure it had a cassette player. I eventually ended up with hundreds of cassettes, most of which I gave to a friend of mine years ago. I still have a few which I recorded from an old girlfriend, with her quirky calligraphy on the case insert.