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  1. #26
    I don't know anything about it but I found this:


    'The lyric is not “Fifty-sixth and Wabasha”, it is actually “Fifty-six and Wabasha”, referring to the intersection of old Minnesota Highway 56 and Wabasha Street in Saint Paul, Minnesota. If you listen, you can hear Dylan sing “fifty-six”, rather than “fifty-sixth”, particularly on the take that was released as the B-side to “Duquesne Whistle”. Minnesota Highway 56 no longer intersects Wabasha Street, but from 1963 to 1974 it did intersect Wabasha Street, at what is now (in Feb. 2021) the intersection of George Street and Cesar Chavez Street in St. Paul.'



    Meet Me In The Morning: at dawn at 56th and Wabasha | Untold Dylan

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    I don't know anything about it but I found this:


    'The lyric is not “Fifty-sixth and Wabasha”, it is actually “Fifty-six and Wabasha”, referring to the intersection of old Minnesota Highway 56 and Wabasha Street in Saint Paul, Minnesota. If you listen, you can hear Dylan sing “fifty-six”, rather than “fifty-sixth”, particularly on the take that was released as the B-side to “Duquesne Whistle”. Minnesota Highway 56 no longer intersects Wabasha Street, but from 1963 to 1974 it did intersect Wabasha Street, at what is now (in Feb. 2021) the intersection of George Street and Cesar Chavez Street in St. Paul.'



    Meet Me In The Morning: at dawn at 56th and Wabasha | Untold Dylan
    Yes that's where I got the information. I used to know that area reasonably well when I lived in MN. Like everything it has changed a lot since the old days.

  4. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    I saw Freddy Live and hes the only man I think Ive ever seen whose big enough to put his strap on his right shoulder! Great Bluesman!!!
    I saw him live too. That strap on the right shoulder was...different. But it worked.
    He used a metal fingerpick and that helped him get that biting tone he sometimes favored.


  5. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    I saw him live too. That strap on the right shoulder was...different. But it worked.
    He used a metal fingerpick and that helped him get that biting tone he sometimes favored.

    Hmmm...he passed away in ‘76...you guys must be OLD!

    LOL...

    Absolutely wonderful tone. Not to diss Eric Clapton, or a bunch of other talented guitarists, but THIS is the real stuff. Too bad he passed away so young.

  6. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Hmmm...he passed away in ‘76...you guys must be OLD!

    LOL...

    Absolutely wonderful tone. Not to diss Eric Clapton, or a bunch of other talented guitarists, but THIS is the real stuff. Too bad he passed away so young.
    Born late '58 (as Mott the Hoople put it).
    I must have seen Freddie in '74 or '75.

    Clapton once said in an interview that his soloing amounted to shuffling Freddie King licks around.
    Freddie, like BB, was a good singer. I think that helps a blues soloist immensely. For one thing, phrasing. For another, silence. Singers don't feel antsy about silence the way guitarists too often do.

    But getting back to Bob, here he is with Susan Tedeschi for "Highway 61 Revisited."


  7. #31

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    Susan is such a sweetheart. 29 years old in that video.

    I kept waiting for her to pull out her slide or sing a verse or 2 though. Also distracted trying to figure out who the other guitarists were, but that’s just me.

    I always liked Johnny Winters version:


  8. #32

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    Here’s a nice Sheryl Crow version of Mississippi. A little too over-arranged for my taste, but she sings the heck out of it.



    Only one thing...I did wrong...I stayed in Mississippi a day too long.

    Great line. I use it all the time.

    The best Dylan version is on the bootleg series.

  9. #33

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    Here’s a wonderful version of Don’t Think Twice by my favorite young musician Billy Strings...



    Who says the younger generation doesn’t have taste and talent??

    BTW I always thought Dylan played guitar on the original, but possibly it was Bruce Langhorne, potentially interpreting a pattern Dylan had worked out himself. Or maybe it was Dylan playing with Langhorne playing fills.

    There is an interesting exposition of this issue featuring Nat Hentoff and Clifford Heflin. Funny that the actual facts are not 100% clear at this point. I imagine the details will be in Heylin’s forthcoming book.

    12 It Wasn’t Bruce A Musical Whodunnit (Don’t Think Twice (1962)

  10. #34

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    I’m not much of a singer (neither is Dylan these days), but trying to sing Dylan and accompany yourself is hard.

    The way he draws out the syllables and changes chords is tricky. Also, he may not be much of a technically advanced guitarist, but at least on his studio recordings he puts the emphasis in just the right place.

    Give it a try sometime. It’s harder than it looks. One imagines Dylan spending a lot of time trying to get the words and accompaniment just right.

  11. #35
    Compare:


  12. #36

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    I think I read that Bruce Langhorne was sitting in the wings playing the real guitar and Bob’s volume was off.

    Just kidding.

    Bob is not a great player, but he is usually effective in his own way.

    He has always had long fingernails on his picking hand, and he does make use of them from time to time.

  13. #37
    There are similarities between those versions, like the hammer from E to F on the G7. That one was pretty distinctive and it's on both versions clearly, like a signature, so I think that was Bob himself on both...

    ... probably

  14. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    There are similarities between those versions, like the hammer from E to F on the G7. That one was pretty distinctive and it's on both versions clearly, like a signature, so I think that was Bob himself on both...

    ... probably
    I find it interesting that people are surprised that professional musicians can actually, you know, play music. Or guitarists or drummers or singers can play the piano. I mean, they are paid to make music. What else do they have to do 24/7 when they’re not writing iconic songs? IDK, play the guitar or the piano??

    That said, I have marveled before at how sloppy Bob’s playing can be, though he usually gets the job done. As I recall Dave van Ronk says that when he arrived in NYC Dylan couldn’t play or sing a lick. In less than a year, he was the darling of Greenwich Village, and everyone was playing HIS versions of songs like House of the Rising Sun (which he stole from DVR, but I digress).

  15. #39

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    Norman Lamont is a singer-songwriter living in Edinburgh. I like his stuff. Here is a song he wrote called "The Ballad of Bob Dylan" which I think is funny, engaging, and madcap in a Dylanesque way.


  16. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    I find it interesting that people are surprised that professional musicians can actually, you know, play music.
    I do know what you mean.

    That said, I have marvelled before at how sloppy Bob’s playing can be, though he usually gets the job done.
    Maybe it's a bit rough sometimes but I think, when he's doing his songs it doesn't really matter. Folk players just need an accompaniment. You're a guitar player, of course, so you notice more. You know how everyone'll clap a song they like because they like it, they don't care how it's done that much.

  17. #41
    My favorite version of Dont Think Twice Its Alright was by Lenny Breau. It was one of his first songs in his set at the first concert of him I ever heard at Berklee in the seventies.With so many jazz snobs it was pretty refreshing to show us students that it did not just have be songs with a lot of two fives to be Great Jazz! I got to live and study with Lenny in Nashville later for a week. He was the most serious and talented guitarist I have ever known. Lenny didnt even drive a car because he told me he thought too much about music to be a safe driver. Thats pretty serious. Lenny was playing a Hagstrom 12 string with 6 strings which was pretty refreshing,too. Jack Pearson and Reggie Wooten play Fender Squire Strats sometimes on gigs. So I guess its more the Indian than the arrow,sometimes.

  18. #42
    Absolutely. Lenny did a great number on this tune, really genuinely 'jazzy'. Starts slow but ramps up later. It's worth posting here. You were pretty lucky to have been around so close, if even only for a week!


  19. #43
    If you have any questions you think I might be able to answer just ask. If you would like to talk on the phone about Lenny,that can arranged . Lenny had switched over to a Tom Holmes 1 pickup super wide neck double cut solidbody by Nashville. I got serial number 2 of that guitar,but the neck was really too wide for me. I let Gruhns in Nashville sell it for about what I had in it. 750$ Maybe you could teach me how to post material in exchange for over the phone lesson about Lenny if you want.

  20. #44
    Lenny also had a Flamenco guitar Chet Atkins gave him. Chet was like a father to Lenny in Nashville. He put up a 10,000$ reward when Lenny was murdered. But it turned out to be Lennys Evil wife who killed him. Some think Lenny spending the couples rent and food money on drugs is why she flipped out and killed him.

  21. #45

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    Lots of old video of guys in suits interviewing pop stars in the 1960s. Dylan is the only guy who decades later sounds like an adult.

  22. #46

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    Went to Dylan in Portland a couple years after the Christian phase, when he was back to playing his full rep.

    Just because he was Dylan of course. I played several of his songs anytime i was in groups or playing acoustic for people. I liked his songs but not his performance per se.

    But that's recorded performance and often the live is much better. Gotta give him a chance.

    But maybe ... not so much. The band was good, his guitar was adequate but the voice and on stage persona were clearly Dylan.

    Glad I went but wouldn't have gone again if it was free. Would rather hear his stuff performed by Judy Collins, Peter Paul and Mary, Gordon Lightfoot, any number of people.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  23. #47
    Me too... shhh! But there are exceptions.


  24. #48

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    Bob Dylan is 80-img_4040-jpg

  25. #49

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    I had a friend in high school who played a 12-string guitar. He loved the acoustic guitar. He played some Dylan songs. Thing is, he didn't care about Dylan's lyrics or his guitar playing. He loved his melodies.

    If Dylan is underrated in any area it is as a crafter of indelible melodies.

  26. #50

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    Bob Dylan is 80-watchtower-poster-jpg