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  1. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    I call that a football rattle, had to make one in woodwork at school...

    The best friction drum I ever heard was in a little two room museum in Ghana mainly dedicated to Kente & Adinkra cloth, i wandered away from the looms into a store room, backed out & was motioned back in by the attendant I'd woken up.

    He produced a small hand drum, noted my lack of interest (it was dusty & unimpressive looking), waited until I turned my back & laughed as I ran into the wall when he played it...

    Having spent a sleepless night listening to a leopard circling camp once it's not a sound I'll forget...

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by dot75
    I call that a football rattle, had to make one in woodwork at school...
    they were used in hunting too I think

    I guess in folk cultures those rattles are often associated with banishing evil spirits.. you make noise to banish them (in China they burn bamboo to produce rattle for that purpose)
    I also think that using it in Christmas' Eve is an assimiliation of pagan tradition to Christian rituals.
    The same as traditional Russian 'masslenitsa' (spting pan-cake festivities) is totally pagan feast that in Christian period became the last week before beginnin a Great 40 days Easter fast

  4. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by dot75
    I call that a football rattle, had to make one in woodwork at school...
    As a kid I had a massive old Air Raid Warden rattle that was used in WW2 to alert citizens to incoming gas attacks. It was totally deafening. When I used it at football matches the crowd around me would stand back in fear for their ears. Others hid their regular football rattles in deference.

    A question for the Early Music experts in the house-1_299-jpg

  5. #29

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    In the percussion world these rattles are known a ratchets. It's an orchestral instrument!

  6. #30

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    Some kind of a bit similar orchestral percussion (and a few others too) used in the slow section

    From 06:15 till 08:40



  7. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Howzabopping
    Maybe my old teacher was referring to the rommelpot, who knows! Indeed it sounds like an ancestor of the Brazilian cuica -- another fascinating instrument.

    I believe this called a talking drum sometime.

  8. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Howzabopping
    Maybe my old teacher was referring to the rommelpot, who knows! Indeed it sounds like an ancestor of the Brazilian cuica -- another fascinating instrument.

    I believe this called a talking drum sometime.