1. #1

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    A killer version of "Memphis Soul Stew" with Cornell Dupree on guitar, Bernard Purdie on drums, and Jerry Jemmott on bass.


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    King Curtis sings the blues. (He also plays guitar on this album. So does Al Casey and Mac Pierce.)


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    Aretha with King Curtis, Cornell Dupree, Jerry Jemmott, and Bernard Purdie


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    Hi, M,
    You're truly a Blue-eyed soul brother! Love King Curtis! When I played in small R@B/Soul groups(guitar, bass, drums, plus sax) in Chicago, we always played "Ode to Billy Joe." It was a real crowd pleaser. Sadly, these times, I believe, are lost forever except for a few Sexagenerian/Septuagenerian souls. What a difference a day makes. Play live . . . Marinero

    Here's the song I first heard in the 50's that caused my immediate addiction to tenor sax. Enjoy! M


  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    A killer version of "Memphis Soul Stew" with Cornell Dupree on guitar, Bernard Purdie on drums, and Jerry Jemmott on bass.

    some real greats right there!!

    just watched a documentary on ornette coleman..he said when he first arrived in nyc, king curtis picked him up in his rolls royce...they were both originally from ft. worth texas....blew ornettes mind...curtis was very popular at the time

    cheers

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, M,
    You're truly a Blue-eyed soul brother! Love King Curtis! When I played in small R@B/Soul groups(guitar, bass, drums, plus sax) in Chicago, we always played "Ode to Billy Joe." It was a real crowd pleaser. Sadly, these times, I believe, are lost forever except for a few Sexagenerian/Septuagenerian souls. What a difference a day makes. Play live . . . Marinero

    Here's the song I first heard in the 50's that caused my immediate addiction to tenor sax. Enjoy! M

    Night Train was high on the song list of my first combo, "The Martians" which I formed with another trumpet player and a clarinet player one summer Bible School. I had the sheet music, that helped. We did "The Saints Go Marching In" and that sort of thing. Can't say it went over that well, so it gave me a good start in jazz in that it prepared me to ignore rejection. Saved a lot of heartbreak later.