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  1. #51

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    Unfortunately I was
    thinking of Footloose

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Unfortunately I was
    thinking of Footloose
    HAHAHAHAHAHHA good one!

  4. #53

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    I played rockabilly in the early 80's. Pretty good fun up until the leader tried to force us into uniforms...not my bag
    Pretty sure it was called rockabilly in the 70's 'cos you had those great compilation albums like 'Imperial Rockabilly' etc

    This was my rig for the rockabilly band, no pedals, echo or reverb...not even a vibrato arm!

    Thoughts on Rockabilly-sc0009b-jpg
    Last edited by sasquatch; 01-03-2021 at 11:46 AM.

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by Littlemark
    It's just marketing. Bad marketing at that. Your don't need anything fancy to get that sound. I'm sure the pedal is actual fine. Just superfluous. And it's not going to help you hit the right notes.
    What is actually more helpful would be single coils. No rockabilly players at that time would have had those new fancy hum bucking pickups. It a Gretsch. Aside from Cliff Gallup, I don't think anyone played a Gretsch. (See Eddie Cochrane and the e bass above).

    But gear isn't overly important in rockabilly. Not like surf music. A single coil guitar into a tube amp (yes with flatwounds) will get you most of the way there.

    But hey Mark make sure you use an analogue (style) delay. You don't want to end up sounding like the edge with those clean repeats.
    Marketing, yes. I don't object to that.
    Gretsch is a popular guitar among those who play this style (and related styles) of music nowadays. "Psychobilly" is a genre now but wasn't when I was young. It is not '50s rockabilly but heavily influenced by it. Reverend Horton Heat's Jim Heath plays a signature model Gretsch .

    I'm a single coil guy but Scotty Moore played a Super 400 with Elvis---not a single coil. Duane Eddy also played a Gretsch. Duane wasn't a rockabilly guy per se but a VERY popular and influential guitar player. (When Tommy Tedesco met Duane Eddy, he asked him, "Hey, did anyone ever ask you to play like me? I get asked---in the studio--to play like you every day!") Chet Atkins also played a Gretsch and he too was a very influential guitarist. Les Paul was also a hugely influential guitarist and he played with humbucker pickups.

    I don't think people who liked and played rockabilly early on heard ONLY that. They heard everything else that was on the radio. I think period authenticity is a bigger concern of people who want to re-create it for its own sake. (Like some people do with swing bands of the pre-bebop era where dancers happily Lindy Hop the night away.) Nothing wrong with that but it's not the only way to absorb and reflect an influence.

    Then there are bands who want to take the vibe (as they hear / feel it) and put their own spin on it. I think of the Stray Cats in this way. (Though they did start out with the double bass and only a snare and cymbal for drums.) The Flat Duo Jets also come to mind. "Neo Rockabilly" is sometimes used to refer to them. Obviously, Setzer is a Gretsch guy.

    I don't see myself as "neo rockabilly." Rockabilly is not a hallmark of my playing. In part because of the genre's greatest weakness: everything's a revved-up 12-bar blues. I love a revved-up 12-bar blues as much as anyone but I don't want several in a row.

    George Harrison had been playing a '57 Gretsch Duo Jet but switched in 1963 to the Country Gentleman because of Chet Atkins . George was long associated with Gretsch guitars. The Beatles weren't a rockabilly band but EVERYONE heard them and most young people liked them and many a young guitar player wanted to play a guitar like George played. I think The Beatles recorded more songs by Carl Perkins---who was rockabilly--- than any other single songwriter: Honey Don't, Everybody's Tryin' To Be My Baby, Matchbox, Lend Me Your Comb. Carl was one of George's heroes and the whole band thought he was great. (Carl said they cut a version of Blue Suede Shoes but never released it.)

    Like I said, I'm a single coil guy. But that's me. I don't have any objection to someone playing what they call rockabilly (or roots rock, whatever)
    on a Gretsch or a Gibson. And my delay pedal is analog.

    Still think that Rumble Seat pedal provides a variety of nice tones. Too rich for my blood, as I said before, I sure wouldn't turn up my nose if one came my way. ;o)

  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes

    I'm a single coil guy but Scotty Moore played a Super 400 with Elvis---not a single coil.
    OK? .. When I think of Scotty with Elvis I always think P90s especially that gold ES295




  7. #56

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    Elvis playing Scotty's humbucker equipped guitar. A little later, but whatever, I like the song.


  8. #57
    The BEST rockabilly style solo i have EVER heard is Danny Gattons version of Mystery Train on Austin City Limits now available on YT.

  9. #58

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    george harrisons beatle era self painted strat-rocky...with be bop a lula painted on upper bout



    cheers

  10. #59

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    There are certainly lots of 12 bar Blues based tunes. But also plenty that are not. I should make a play list for myself.

    Honey don't
    Blue Moon of Kentucky
    Long Blonde hair
    Love me
    Suzy Q
    I've got a woman
    Rock House
    Her love rubbed off
    Mona Lisa
    Speed limit
    Lonesome tears in my eyes

    Just off the top of my head. Some new songs written nowadays in that style aren't Blues as well.

  11. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    The BEST rockabilly style solo i have EVER heard is Danny Gattons version of Mystery Train on Austin City Limits now available on YT.
    There are so many great ones - and a lot of those are by Danny Gatton! I always liked the solo on The Stray Cats' version of The Race is On - not sure if it wasn't played half by Setzer and half by Dave Edmunds. It's been a long time since I heard it. I'm still quite proud that the first song I ever played live in a band was a Dave Edmunds / Nick Lowe song: I Knew The Bride. It was one of the first singles I ever bought. Spookily, I think the last single I ever bought was also a Nick Lowe (The House on The Hill, IIRC).

    Derek

  12. #61

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    George with Carl and Dave Edmunds:



    And with Eric Clapton, Roseanne Cash, Ringo, looks like bass and drums from Stray Cats...


  13. #62

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    Rockabilly goes back to the 1940s. Jimmy Wyble's guitar break in Roly Poly is probably the best rockabilly solo ever recorded.
    Last edited by nopedals; 01-04-2021 at 02:42 PM.

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by nopedals
    Rockabilly goes back to the 1940s. Jimmy Wyble's guitar break in Roly Poly is probably the best rockabilly solo ever recorded.
    Well it is obviously subjective, and while rock'n'roll derived from country music including Western swing (that's where Bill Haley and Scotty Moore started out), IMO that's not rockabilly. You need the backbeat that came from the blues and black "race records" to have real rock'n'roll, and hence rockabilly, which is after all a more country-oriented rock music.

    Plus the guitar playing is very nice but very jazz-oriented, not RNRish to my ears.

    I think to have true rockabilly you have to have a slapped bass sound and slapback echo.

    Admittedly this is all opinion, but it basically goes back to Sam Phillips and what he did with Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins and their groups.
    Last edited by Doctor Jeff; 01-04-2021 at 04:04 PM.

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    However, the tripe by the "Stray Cats" is abominable.
    I remember hearing an interview with Benny Carter where he basically said the same thing about what is and isn't jazz. Lambasted groups like Tony Williams' Lifetime, later Miles, etc.

  16. #65

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  17. #66

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  18. #67

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  19. #68

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    one of the best og rockabilly players i ever got to see & meet...the great ronnie dawson...he was just a kid when he started recording way back when, but he developed with many years of seasoning, into a first rate rockabilly singer/player

    conan played a little...he knew



    rip ronnie D...one of the best

    cheers

  20. #69

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    Pretty far from his rockabilly material, but this has a ii V I



  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    I remember hearing an interview with Benny Carter where he basically said the same thing about what is and isn't jazz. Lambasted groups like Tony Williams' Lifetime, later Miles, etc.
    I think Barry Harris said something similar about Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock (as well as Miles Davis beyond a certain period) that it wasn't jazz anymore.

  22. #71

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  23. #72
    What about some FEMALE rockabilly like Wanda?

  24. #73

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    Nobody's stopping you.

  25. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    What about some FEMALE rockabilly like Wanda?
    Rosie Flores is one of my favourites.

    Imelda May, too. For a while she was married to Daryl Higham who himself was an exceptional rockabilly picker. I really enjoyed Imelda May's double tracked Mary Ford tunes on the tribute to Les Paul concert. But that's getting away from Rockabilly.

  26. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    What about some FEMALE rockabilly like Wanda?
    I saw her live several years ago on an Outlaw Country Cruise, God bless her. Had to sit in a chair the whole night, but so did BB when I saw him

    I also saw several years ago, at a local club, Rosie Flores, and she was still great!

  27. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    What about some FEMALE rockabilly like Wanda?

  28. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger
    Rosie Flores is one of my favourites.

    Imelda May, too. For a while she was married to Daryl Higham who himself was an exceptional rockabilly picker. I really enjoyed Imelda May's double tracked Mary Ford tunes on the tribute to Les Paul concert. But that's getting away from Rockabilly.
    Hey, this is rockabilly. It's got slapback echo, reverb, a standup bass, uptempo, and ATTITUDE. And Jeff and Imelda ;-)


  29. #78

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    It's a great DVD. Haven't watched it in a long time - I recall being really impressed with the drummer. Well impressed with all of them, of course!

  30. #79

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    ahhh..so this is another "what is ____" thread..

    it seems the marketing folks win again..I doubt many of the musicians/singers knew they were "rockabilly"

    jerry lee lewis..really..pure country and some way back folk tunes before "whole lotta shaken" ..Goodnight Irean..1933 written by huddie ledbetter ( ledbelly)..
    and some hank williams- early1950's --"You Win Again"--the B side to the Great Balls of Fire-45

    the term itself an amalgam of Rock & Hillbilly..(called "country&western before the merger on many jukeboxes and many local DJ's) ... that term may be considered offensive to some today..

    of course the marketing dept could not be stopped..think early Dylan pure folk..plays electric.."folk-rock"..If "Toumbstone Blues" qualifies as such.."..Im going back to New York City.."

    and as one post shows what marketing did to the "Metal" genre

    Jeff Beck a rock guitar god..but can play other styles...as some posted him with a "jazz box) gibby 175?..doing some nice elvis riffs..

    ..I have been called a fusion/jazz/prog rock player and most of the time I wonder..." what did I play to make someone hear those styles?"

  31. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by wolflen
    ahhh..so this is another "what is ____" thread..
    No. It isn't. It's an invitation to share one's thoughts on rockabilly.

    Originally the term meant "rock and roll by hillbillies." "Hillbilly" was a term for country music dating back to the '40s.

    But this is 2021. Some people are influenced (to varying degrees) by rockabilly. Others are not so much influenced by it but remain appreciative of certain bands / records that are termed rockabilly.

  32. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    ... Originally the term meant "rock and roll by hillbillies." "Hillbilly" was a term for country music dating back to the '40s....

    I only attended one "real rockabilly" gig. Jerry Lee, The Killer, sometime btw 89-92, can't remember exactly. Before that, I was at Matchbox arround 81-83. Matchbox I file as "revival" (as opposed to "real"), together with Stray Cats and so on.

    Matchbox were pure r'n'r, as far as I can remember.

    The Killer, he was great, trashing piano, screaming ... However, I was quite surprised, not to say disappointed with his band. I remember thinking and expressing opinion, they sounded like country musicians trying to play blues rock but not being able to break from their usual routine. In reality, they were probably session guys, hired ad hoc for low profile tour.


    My Band camp

  33. #82

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    roots of rockabilly...the delmore and louvin brothers were big influences on everly brothers and other later r&r artists

    hillbilly boogie




    cheers

  34. #83

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    th original -suzie q- by dale hawkins..with the great james burton on guitar (when he was only around 16-17 years old!)




    cheers

  35. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    roots of rockabilly...the delmore and louvin brothers were big influences on everly brothers and other later r&r artists

    hillbilly boogie
    That sounds more like Western Swing to me.

    Not a criticism.

    Funny to hear Jerry Lee Lewis called rockabilly. I never heard him called that growing up and I grew up among people who were Jerry Lee Lewis fans. I've heard him all my life. I always thought of him as rock'n'roll, not rockabilly.


  36. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    That sounds more like Western Swing to me.

    Not a criticism.
    it's really all one..blues to western swing to rockabilly to r&r...the influences melded

    here's bill haley..he started as western swing...before groundbreaking rock around the clock...



    as per delmore brothers- some random facts

    Bob Dylan was quoted in the Chicago Tribune, on November 10, 1985 as saying "The Delmore Brothers, God, I really loved them! I think they've influenced every harmony I've ever tried to sing.


    Their "Freight Train Boogie" (recorded for the King label in 1946) is regarded by some as the first rock and roll record. Their best-known song, "Blues Stay Away From Me" (also on King, 1949), was covered by Johnny Burnette and The Rock and Roll Trio, Gene Vincent and the Blue Caps, The Louvin Brothers, The Browns, Les Paul and Mary Ford, Doc Watson, The Notting Hillbillies, Marshall Chapman, and The Everly Brothers.


    The Delmore Brothers were inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in October 1971, as well as the Alabama Music Hall of Fame in 1989 and the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2001. Their pioneering contribution to the genre has been recognized by the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

    cheers

  37. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    it's really all one..blues to western swing to rockabilly to r&r...the influences melded...
    Great post, as usual.
    I'm all about melding influences.

  38. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic

    as per delmore brothers- some random facts

    Bob Dylan was quoted in the Chicago Tribune, on November 10, 1985 as saying "The Delmore Brothers, God, I really loved them! I think they've influenced every harmony I've ever tried to sing.


    Their "Freight Train Boogie" (recorded for the King label in 1946) is regarded by some as the first rock and roll record. Their best-known song, "Blues Stay Away From Me" (also on King, 1949), was covered by Johnny Burnette and The Rock and Roll Trio, Gene Vincent and the Blue Caps, The Louvin Brothers, The Browns, Les Paul and Mary Ford, Doc Watson, The Notting Hillbillies, Marshall Chapman, and The Everly Brothers.


    The Delmore Brothers were inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in October 1971, as well as the Alabama Music Hall of Fame in 1989 and the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2001. Their pioneering contribution to the genre has been recognized by the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

    cheers
    I was about to say, well that's country boogie, but it ain't rock n roll, but doggonit when that guitar comes in it's pure rockabilly. You can see where Bill Kirchen got his inspiration. BTW, the Delmore Brothers grew up not too far from where my father did in northern Alabama. Tough times in the 30's and 40's in that place--anybody got out who could.

    It's probably not wise to split things too much--just lump 'em all together. It's all good.

    Here is another great version of that song with Marty Stuart (planning to play in Omaha in October--please, please...):



    Also of course the great Doc Watson, who was no slouch at rockabilly hisself:


  39. #88

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Here is another great version of that song with Marty Stuart (planning to play in Omaha in October--please, please...):
    I'm having a senior moment here and can't recall the name of Marty's guitarist. He's the one I posted a video of on another thread talking about flatwound strings on Teles and such. (Luther Perkins with Johnny Cash always played flatwounds. He was not alone.) Guy can play.

    Neatomic, can you help me out here?

  40. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    I'm having a senior moment here and can't recall the name of Marty's guitarist. He's the one I posted a video of on another thread talking about flatwound strings on Teles and such. (Luther Perkins with Johnny Cash always played flatwounds. He was not alone.) Guy can play.

    Neatomic, can you help me out here?
    Makin' that Jaguar sound mighty fine!

  41. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    Makin' that Jaguar sound mighty fine!
    Kenny Vaughan! That's his name.

  42. #91

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  43. #92

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  44. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    I'm having a senior moment here and can't recall the name of Marty's guitarist. He's the one I posted a video of on another thread talking about flatwound strings on Teles and such. (Luther Perkins with Johnny Cash always played flatwounds. He was not alone.) Guy can play.

    Neatomic, can you help me put here?

    Kenny Vaughn

  45. #94

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    More melding. M. Stuart, Rockabilly bass and country picker Flacke


  46. #95
    I met Ray at a Hellacasters Concert in Nashville at the Exit Inn many years ago and Ray told me Ritchie Blackmoor was one of his favorite guitarists and that his playing reminded him of a snake charmer. Ray was well known for some really good pedal steel licks without a bender. He put out a Hot Licks tape years ago that was very good. I had a friend who owned about 30 different telecasters who won the raffle that night for a free G and L telecaster! Go figure!

  47. #96
    Quote Originally Posted by AllanAllen
    Nobody's stopping you.
    how do you transfer a video from you tube to JGO at the correct place? I would really like to know.

  48. #97
    I remember doing a gig with an Elvis impersonator but with real Jordonaires as the backup singers. I had to learn the show quickly and did not learn all of it in time for the show. One of The Jordanaires gave me hand signals behind his back for the changes. It might have Love Me Tender. Have many other members done tribute type gigs? I read that the Jordanaires were some of the first people to use the Nashville number system in the studio. Sun studio is a tourist attraction in Memphis and early RCA studio on Music Row is an tourist attraction in Nashvegas. Its interesting to see that early recording equipment. Those old echo chambers were big concrete boxs that signal was sent through. Im not sure about plate echo maybe someone else could describe how it works? I do remember when bands would buy an acetate or hot vinyl of the early sessions. I remember recording at Ardent in Memphis. I believe Jeff Beck and ZZ Top recorded there. Some bands recorded at American studios were Reggie Young used to work. There is also a Stax/Volt studio museum but I dont know how much is original. I worked with Charlie Rich quite a bit,he was an original Sun artist with Mohair Sam. I was once booked in Shea Stadium with Charlie. He could play pretty good jazz piano when he wanted to.

  49. #98

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    Having fun with these rockabilly videos pulled my MIA P bass with GHS flatwounds and playing along.


  50. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    I worked with Charlie Rich quite a bit,he was an original Sun artist with Mohair Sam. I was once booked in Shea Stadium with Charlie. He could play pretty good jazz piano when he wanted to.
    Rich was so soulful! I love his work from Sun in the 1950s through the mid-1970s stuff on Columbia. He always brought some Memphis into even his most Nash-Vegas records.

    Rich's arrangement of "Nice and Easy" caught Alex Chilton's ear, and Chilton recorded it and played it live for a while (in additional to keeping "Lonely Weekends" in his set list). Artists like Rich and Snooks Eaglin (and Chilton) who move between genres with no fear are awesome.

  51. #100

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    [QUOTE=steve burchfield;1090235 I read that the Jordanaires were some of the first people to use the Nashville number system in the studio. [/QUOTE]

    I've read that too. Can't recall where off the top of my head.