Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Posts 1 to 50 of 52
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    A little sneak peek. Looks like fun to me.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu


  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    cool!

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    fab

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Thanks for posting!
    Great reminder of just how good those guys were, what a tight band!

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    I admit I can't get enough of the Beatles. I particularly like their middle period, when they were finding their way in the studio and as songwriters--Revolver and Rubber Soul. But they're all good.

    The interesting thing is how strongly shared that sentiment is among my family. Without my urging, my kids are all Beatles fanatics. My ex-BIL is a Beatles obsessive and wrote a forward to one of their big coffee-table books. My fiancee's BIL plays gigs featuring songs from the British Invasion (before 1965), about 2/3 of which are Beatles songs.

    And the 2 remaining Beatles have music coming out this month. (I heard Ringo's new song yesterday, and TBH it didn't overwhelm me, but it didn't totally suck, either.)

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    If there’s one thing in the world I don’t need to hear another word about, it’s The Beatles.

    I think the continuing obsession (even among people born after the group dissolved) with a moderately talented and highly derivative English band that lasted around a decade and probably only had something mildly original and minimally valuable to say for maybe 2 years at most is an indication of the artistic and musical wasteland that was the ensuing half decade of popular “music” from 1970-2020.

    A 20-something today excited about the Beatles is analogous to me, as a 20-year-old in 1980, being obsessed with The Paul Whiteman Orchestra.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BickertRules

    I think the continuing obsession (even among people born after the group dissolved) with a moderately talented and highly derivative English band that lasted around a decade and probably only had something mildly original and minimally valuable to say for maybe 2 years at most is an indication of the artistic and musical wasteland that was the ensuing half decade of popular “music” from 1970-2020.

    A 20-something today excited about the Beatles is analogous to me, as a 20-year-old in 1980, being obsessed with The Paul Whiteman Orchestra.
    funny thoughts for someone with a bickert rules handle....hah

    i'd imagine you meant half century...1970-2020...bickerts era...

    yea it all stank...50 years of wasteland

    c'mon man...

    cheers

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Yea, sure, the Beatles meant nothing.
    Right.
    Seriously can’t you find something with more class and intelligence to start a troll war?
    Go.
    Go away. Go Now, you disgrace to Mr Bickert.
    Wait! You can join Marinero! Perfect together!

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    funny thoughts for someone with a bickert rules handle....hah

    i'd imagine you meant half century...1970-2020...bickerts era...

    yea it all stank...50 years of wasteland

    c'mon man...

    cheers
    There IS good music from the past 50 years, just not good POPULAR music. I don’t consider Bickert or pretty much any non-vocal jazz from the last 50 years to be “popular”, other than swing LARPers like Harry Connick, Diana Krall, and Michael Buble in a very peripheral way - a tiny sliver of the general public even like that.

    The average music consumer - not the members here, we’re outliers - has very little to point to in the past half-century that is not even worse - mostly much worse, considering hip-hop, than The Beatles - I think that is a large part of their continuing allure - what really has happened in Pop since then - maybe Michael Jackson? and then??

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jazzkritter
    Yea, sure, the Beatles meant nothing.
    Right.
    Seriously can’t you find something with more class and intelligence to start a troll war?
    Go.
    Go away. Go Now, you disgrace to Mr Bickert.
    Wait! You can join Marinero! Perfect together!
    haha - nice I like it.

    No, The Beatles didn’t mean “nothing” - they were probably the last popular music that meant anything at all - that’s why we, from geezer boomers down to teenagers, for God’s sake, are still stuck on them. Can you imagine being a teenager in 1980 (I was) and waiting with anticipation for the next movie or book about Benny Goodman?!

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Oh please. This forum has no limit on people who argue the most ridiculous points.
    I accede to your far greater musical knowledge than mine.
    No room for me here. Bye.

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jazzkritter
    Yea, sure, the Beatles meant nothing.
    Right.
    Seriously can’t you find something with more class and intelligence to start a troll war?
    Go.
    Go away. Go Now, you disgrace to Mr Bickert.
    Wait! You can join Marinero! Perfect together!


    I kinda agree with Mr Bickert .. Believe it or not :-O

    I guess it is a Gen-X thing .. after being forced to Beatles 24/7/365 by our parent the thought of more Beatles triggers our PSTD


    I mean don't get me wrong .. They where great and of utmost importance (as Mr. Bickert also signals) .. But the thought of having to sit thru more footage of their antics makes me nauseous

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    I kinda agree with Mr Bickert .. Believe it or not :-O

    I guess it is a Gen-X thing .. after being forced to Beatles 24/7/365 by our parent the thought of more Beatles triggers our PSTD
    I was a Gen-Xer, too, in a perhaps less common environment than my cohort.

    My parents were Southerners from the tail end of the greatest generation. They loved Elvis and Fats Domino and Little Richard, but they had no time for The Beatles at all when they came along. Born in 1962, I never really heard The Beatles much until they were no longer together.

    What my parents did watch was 1960s/’70s TV variety shows, so what I saw as a child was the tail-end of the Dean Martin, Sinatra, Fred Astaire generation, and later when I heard The Beatles and other contemporaries, they sounded amateurish in comparison.

    I didn’t get force-fed the Fab Four by my parents, but the culture kept telling me they were the pinnacle, I just couldn’t buy it. Of course, as a working guitarist, I learned all the songs and all the guitar parts and lyrics and vocal harmonies - but the memory of those great ‘30s-‘50s pop singers and a growing knowledge of instrumental jazz and classical music shielded me from The Beatles mythologizing.
    Last edited by BickertRules; 12-22-2020 at 07:32 AM.

  16. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by BickertRules
    haha - nice I like it.

    No, The Beatles didn’t mean “nothing” - they were probably the last popular music that meant anything at all - that’s why we, from geezer boomers down to teenagers, for God’s sake, are still stuck on them. Can you imagine being a teenager in 1980 (I was) and waiting with anticipation for the next movie or book about Benny Goodman?!
    I sort of have a connection to The Beatles. I was on a tour bus and suddenly we notice we are being tormented by fleas! Yuck! We had to pull over at a truck stop and get the bus fumigated! Pronto! We asked the driver who the hell had just been in this bus? It was the Julian Lennon Band and they had brought their pets and left a flea infestation! I guess those fleas thought they had A TICKET TO RIDE!!!

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    It is the Bizarro Let it Be. Happy Beatles, playing and larking, having fun. Even Yoko Ono is nice.

    It will be insufferable. Peter Jackson does not do nuance.

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BickertRules
    I learned all the songs and all the (overrated) guitar parts and lyrics and vocal harmonies - but the memory of those great ‘30s-‘50s pop singers and a growing knowledge of instrumental jazz and classical music shielded me from The Beatles mythologizing.
    Ah .. That is not where I'm coming from tho. What they may have lacked in musical ability they more than made up with they ability to connect with people in a previously unseen manner. Also they definately pushed the envelope with regards to production and presentation.

    I have no intend of taking away from the Beatles accomplishes or similar. But as with is in all artists .. They tend to be rooted in their zeitgeist and when when I came of age that was long gone (and John was dead). But I'm 10 years younger than you


    It was the post oil crisis Reagan/Thatcher/Brezhnev world .. Still threatening nuclear holocaust, but offering little in terms of hope. The 80s where quite something


    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    It is the Bizarro Let it Be. Happy Beatles, playing and larking, having fun. Even Yoko Ono is nice.

    It will be insufferable. Peter Jackson does not do nuance.
    Does look like like fan service , doesn't it

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Back to the movie clips... I thought the lads were - judging by the Abbey Road film - moody, not talking, grumpy, etc, but here they are all smiling, very happy, the shot with Ringo and John walking with arms around each other's back is charming. I'm looking forward to the rest of the film, and Billy Preston is always worth the price of admission.

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BickertRules
    ...
    I think the continuing obsession (even among people born after the group dissolved) with a moderately talented and highly derivative English band that lasted around a decade and probably only had something mildly original and minimally valuable to say for maybe 2 years at most is an indication of the artistic and musical wasteland that was the ensuing half decade of popular “music” from 1970-2020...
    I think that Jackson's project isn't meant to appeal to people that don't, or didn't, dig The Beatles regardless of what year it is now.

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Jackson will do for Beatles fans what his WW1 movie did for military history fans.

    "They Shall Not Grow Old"--highly recommended.

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    I saw the "trailer" above. Looks fun.

    I am not anti-Yoko by any means, but I have to say if I were a bandmember of John's, having her right there in their personal recording space would be a real problem.

    I always thought it was an unwritten rule that girlfriends-boyfriends-friends-groupies-lawyers or whoever is invited has to stay in the recording booth, or at least in the shadows.

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    I saw the "trailer" above. Looks fun.

    I am not anti-Yoko by any means, but I have to say if I were a bandmember of John's, having her right there in their personal recording space would be a real problem.

    I always thought it was an unwritten rule that girlfriends-boyfriends-friends-groupies-lawyers or whoever is invited has to stay in the recording booth, or at least in the shadows.
    Looks like Linda is there too?

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    I saw the "trailer" above. Looks fun.

    I am not anti-Yoko by any means, but I have to say if I were a bandmember of John's, having her right there in their personal recording space would be a real problem.

    I always thought it was an unwritten rule that girlfriends-boyfriends-friends-groupies-lawyers or whoever is invited has to stay in the recording booth, or at least in the shadows.
    I thought that rule was created because of Yoko...

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    Get back home, Loretta.

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    looking forward to it ....
    I’m a big Beatles fan
    Its why I play a guitar (i’m 64 now)

    from the first time I heard that chord
    at the top of ‘A Hard Days Night’

    i was captured ....

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    It will be interesting to see what structure it takes. Ninety minutes of japes and jokes would be unbearable.

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BickertRules
    If there’s one thing in the world I don’t need to hear another word about, it’s The Beatles.

    I think the continuing obsession (even among people born after the group dissolved) with a moderately talented and highly derivative English band that lasted around a decade and probably only had something mildly original and minimally valuable to say for maybe 2 years at most is an indication of the artistic and musical wasteland that was the ensuing half decade of popular “music” from 1970-2020.

    A 20-something today excited about the Beatles is analogous to me, as a 20-year-old in 1980, being obsessed with The Paul Whiteman Orchestra.
    Dude, you're boring.

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    I discovered the Paul Whiteman Orchestra when I was twenty. Simon Rattle and the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra created a revival in interest with some concerts of his work.

    Many young people like the Beatles. This Internet thing allows them to discover all sorts of music at no cost.

  30. #29

    User Info Menu

    Dude the Beatles were ridiculous composers. My favorite thing is that a lot of their tunes were written like jazz standards! Meaning that the melody would progress with the chords in a complex and logical progression. Not just a jam on a couple chords etc like a lot of rock. Pretty cool.

  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BickertRules
    A 20-something today excited about the Beatles is analogous to me, as a 20-year-old in 1980, being obsessed with The Paul Whiteman Orchestra.
    The first record took 3 months to get to the shop I ordered it from (because my mate had a saturday job there)

    When I went to pick it up the shop was full of police because the window display was full of the second, which I also bought, which redeemed me in the eyes of the punks who ran the shop...
    Attached Images Attached Images The Beatles movie-yazoo-jpg The Beatles movie-never-jpg 

  32. #31

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive
    Dude, you're boring.
    That’s probably true but so are The Beatles.

  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HmjRM3AziTY

    this thread made me have a look round
    this vid is quite interesting on how the Beatles
    wrote their songs etc

    (persevere it gets better as it goes along)

    working on Strawberry Fields Forever
    at the moment .... great tune , not boring

  34. #33

    User Info Menu

    I had subscribed to David Bennett's channel a few years back. I really like his content and he does a good job communicating.

  35. #34

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    Looks like Linda is there too?
    Just from the look of it Linda was a spectator/guest, not sitting right in front of the guys as they played or right next to John like a goddamn shadow.

    Sorry, I just threw the last thing in there. I'm REALLY not anti-Yoko.
    Last edited by Doctor Jeff; 12-24-2020 at 09:12 AM.

  36. #35

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Just from the look of it she was a spectator/guest, not sitting right in front of the guys as they played or right next to John like a goddamn shadow.

    Sorry, I just threw the last thing in there. I'm REALLY not anti-Yoko.
    No need to be sorry really. If you are a fan of the Beatles doesn't mean you have to like Yoko. In fact the opposite is more true.

  37. #36

    User Info Menu

    Just a note. for whatever the Paul Whiteman Orchestra did it produced some legendary musicians, especially in the formative stages of jazz in the late 20s.. This is the band that showcased the likes of the legendary Bix Beiderbecke as well as the first jazz guitarist and violinist Eddie Lang and Joe Venuti from the great city of Philadelphia among many other legends of the day like Frankie Trumbauer, Red Norvo etc



  38. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by BickertRules
    That’s probably true but so are The Beatles.
    In jazz, songs provide the inspiration and vehicles by which the greatness of the soloist as well as the genius of the original composition can form a creative child.
    I love this performance. I love the arrangement. I love the original song...it's a Beatles tune with all the elegance, sophistication, economy and lyricism of the best of Van Heusen, Porter, Rogers, and Sondheim IMHO.

    But you can find it boring. Our tastes are just different.

  39. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Just from the look of it Linda was a spectator/guest, not sitting right in front of the guys as they played or right next to John like a goddamn shadow.

    Sorry, I just threw the last thing in there. I'm REALLY not anti-Yoko.
    I was listening to the record she did with Ornette, Charlie Haden, Eddie Blackwell and David Izenzon. What ever judgements one may pass on differing tastes, this is heavy company and the music they make is very much a collaboration of disparate yet equally creative contributors. It may not be your cup of tea but I'm savoring it.

  40. #39

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BickertRules
    If there’s one thing in the world I don’t need to hear another word about, it’s The Beatles.

    I think the continuing obsession (even among people born after the group dissolved) with a moderately talented and highly derivative English band that lasted around a decade and probably only had something mildly original and minimally valuable to say for maybe 2 years at most is an indication of the artistic and musical wasteland that was the ensuing half decade of popular “music” from 1970-2020.

    A 20-something today excited about the Beatles is analogous to me, as a 20-year-old in 1980, being obsessed with The Paul Whiteman Orchestra.
    Dude, get of your high horse. The Beatles provided millions of people with joy and inspired many thousands to pick up the guitar. If you'd truly love music, that alone would be good enough. If you can't hear another word about them, why bother reading another thread about it?

    The interesting thing about this new documentary is that the original Let it Be movie focussed on the negative. That's how most people remember the breakup of the Beatles. But in fact there are audio recordings that show that they had plans to record a new album after Abbey Road. Too bad it never happened.

  41. #40

    User Info Menu

    Dude the Beatles are pretty friggin good from an objective stantpoint. They just can be kinda lame and wussy sounding is all. I can't listen to them all the time so I get it if someone doesn't like them personally, but they're pretty friggin good. All 4 of them could sing lead well, all 4 were good on their instrument (or others), and 3 of them, everyone except Ringo were great composers. That's pretty friggin rare. Analyze the depth of some of their compositions and they're on par with the great jazz standards. That's really rare.

  42. #41

    User Info Menu

    I have always had questions about the Beatles and I do not believe in objective standards of taste, but it is clearly significant that one of the world’s most successful film makers is in an editing suite in New Zealand, cutting footage to make a film about a band that broke up over fifty years ago.

    One of my Christmas presents was Craig Brown's book, One Two Three Four: The Beatles In Time. I hope its emphasis on time will answer some of my questions.

  43. #42

    User Info Menu

    I didn't say taste was objective (nice straw man), I said they did irrefutable things that are quantifiable from a musical analysis perspective. If you reread my points.

  44. #43

    User Info Menu

    for anyone wanting to start down the beatle rabbit hole...

    beatles gear...by andy babiuk (a musician & guitar shop owner)

    just make sure to get the latest edition...as updates do occur with new revelations! hah



    cheers

  45. #44

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Clint 55
    I didn't say taste was objective (nice straw man), I said they did irrefutable things that are quantifiable from a musical analysis perspective. If you reread my points.
    I was not responding to your post.

  46. #45

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    I have always had questions about the Beatles and I do not believe in objective standards of taste, but it is clearly significant that one of the world’s most successful film makers is in an editing suite in New Zealand, cutting footage to make a film about a band that broke up over fifty years ago.

    One of my Christmas presents was Craig Brown's book, One Two Three Four: The Beatles In Time. I hope its emphasis on time will answer some of my questions.
    Don‘t know your questions but at least the book puts a different spin on the Beatles story. The way it‘s been retold by thousands of Americans who never got over the first Ed Sullivan show does get boring after a while.


    Gesendet von iPhone mit Tapatalk

  47. #46
    I think Yesterday by Paul McCartney is an excellent chord solo piece and the song intro to And Your Bird Can Sing is really excellent as well!

  48. #47

    User Info Menu

    Yes, you are right.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joeontheguitar
    Dude, get of your high horse. The Beatles provided millions of people with joy and inspired many thousands to pick up the guitar. If you'd truly love music, that alone would be good enough. If you can't hear another word about them, why bother reading another thread about it?

  49. #48

    User Info Menu

    That montage was very enjoyable and I'm looking forward to the film. I came back to the Beatles, after a very long hiatus, mainly through Bill Frisell. Inspired by his approach of sticking close to the melodies, I worked up solo versions of In My Life and Free As A Bird, which I've played live. And now trying to tackle Lucy In the Sky With Diamonds to fuse with In My Life and Blackbird to fuse with Free As Bird for a couple of medleys. Fun to play and good crowd pleasers. Also been using the Beatles Real Book with pruned down and slightly jazzed up lead sheets of most all their tunes.

    As most of you know, there are several albums of Beatles tunes by jazz and other guitarists. My fave at the moment is Chet Atkins Picks On The Beatles. Recently, I attended a workshop with Joshua Breakstone in Japan, whose album Jazz Meets The Beatles jazzed up the tunes so much that they took on a life of their own, and which is quite the antithesis to Frisell's approach. So, just like many songs that we play from the Great American Songbook, maybe that's one sign of good songwriting: They lend themselves to many contexts and renditions and styles and interpretations.

  50. #49

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    I admit I can't get enough of the Beatles. I particularly like their middle period, when they were finding their way in the studio and as songwriters--Revolver and Rubber Soul. But they're all good.

    The interesting thing is how strongly shared that sentiment is among my family. Without my urging, my kids are all Beatles fanatics. My ex-BIL is a Beatles obsessive and wrote a forward to one of their big coffee-table books. My fiancee's BIL plays gigs featuring songs from the British Invasion (before 1965), about 2/3 of which are Beatles songs.

    And the 2 remaining Beatles have music coming out this month. (I heard Ringo's new song yesterday, and TBH it didn't overwhelm me, but it didn't totally suck, either.)
    Doctor Jeff,
    Okay, I’m old! Just curious, What does BIL, and TBH mean?

    Thanks,
    Eddie

  51. #50

    User Info Menu

    Brother-in-law, to be honest.