1. #1

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    More interviews from the UK 'Guitar' magazine in the 70s with the following:

    Ritchie Blackmore, Jerry Donahue, B.B. King, Alvin Lee, Gary Moore, Johnny Winter.



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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Thanks!

  4. #3

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    Thanks.

  5. #4

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    Thanks so much for sharing these

  6. #5

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    So Johnny Winter liked John McLaughlin. Who knew? I like them both.

  7. #6

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    Thanks, Graham!

    I remember BB King writing in his autobiography about the night he met Johnny Winter. Johnny came into the club in a suit with two other white guys. BB thought they were from the IRS!
    But he agreed to let Johnny sit in, having no idea what to expect, and to say the least he was pleasantly surprised.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    So Johnny Winter liked John McLaughlin. Who knew? I like them both.
    Me too. Alvin Lee, whose pre-Woodstock stuff I really liked, mentioned Mahavishnu as well as Charlie Christian, Django, George Benson and Barney Kessel.

  9. #8

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    Yes interesting how many of the rockers of that generation grew up listening to jazz. Even Ritchie Blackmore said he was into Django and Les Paul.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Yes interesting how many of the rockers of that generation grew up listening to jazz. Even Ritchie Blackmore said he was into Django and Les Paul.
    I just read the Blackmore interview. I liked early Deep Purple, then lost interest. Impressively, they seem to still be going. Check this from the interview:

    "But in jazz you have a very broad construction. You can hit ninths, fifths, flattened ninths; thing like that. In rock you're limited, and that's the challenge. This might sound silly, but I feel jazz is too free. You can be playing with a jazzer and be up, and down that fingerboard and you can hit any note you want, it's going to work out a flattened ninth, a tenth, a thirteenth - it's going to be something. Even in a different key it'll fit somewhere; I've done it. Take a progression like A, F sharp, D, and E, and they're experimenting and hitting diminisheds and augmenteds, so when they hit that A, you can play any note you like and it'll either be a flattened third, a flattened fifth, an added sixth or a suspended ninth. They can get away with murder, some of those guys. Great runs and things but because there's so much going on in the background it's bound to be related somewhere along the line, so it always fits. This is probably what they get off on. Whereas in rock, you can't. If somebody's hitting an A, you've got to stick around that A somehow."