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  1. #1

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    Here's a guy I just discovered today . . . natural sense of musicality . . . born to play. I hope you enjoy! Good playing . . . Marinero


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I've been hearing him for awhile. He's got a lot going on. Here he is at a small joint in Tupleo, MS---Elvis' hometown and where some of my relatives live.


  4. #3

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    Man has the blues. It's in him, and it's got to come out. HT: JLH.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Here's a guy I just discovered today . . . natural sense of musicality . . . born to play. I hope you enjoy! Good playing . . . Marinero

    Yeah, Kingfish is great. Got him in heavy rotation on my streaming device thingy.

    John

  6. #5

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    I never worry about the blues dying. But it’s lovely to see energy like this being breathed into it. Thank you for posting this - I hadn’t heard of him before.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    Man has the blues. It's in him, and it's got to come out. HT: JLH.
    Boogie Chillen

  8. #7

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    He's smooth. Reminds me of Peter Green.
    Last gig I had was a 3 piece blues band.

  9. #8

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    I've been checking him out for a while. He's good. I hope he can get the weight under some control.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Here's a guy I just discovered today . . . natural sense of musicality . . . born to play. I hope you enjoy! Good playing . . . Marinero

    This guy is amazing. TIG isn't exactly my favourite tune (due in no small part to playing it badly in many bands lol) but he adds a whole new lick of paint to it...

  11. #10

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    I usually don't try to kill joy threads, where people find joy in music.

    But gotta ask here .. Serious question

    What exactly is Kingfish's contribution here that improves on this? (Other than the occasional altered lick)

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    I usually don't try to kill joy threads, where people find joy in music.

    But gotta ask here .. Serious question

    What exactly is Kingfish's contribution here that improves on this? (Other than the occasional altered lick)
    Improvement over BB is both impossible and beside the point. Blues (when done right) is a living form that is about personal expression and interpretation. If someone manages to play a version of a song that allows a listener to perceive that player's distinct musical personality and/or the message and emotions of the song, then the player has succeeded. However, if you don't like that version and think only BB's version is worthy, then nothing is stopping you from listening to BB's version(s).

    Also, there is so much "blues" that is petformed by people wearing Blues Brothers costumes, pretending to be something they're not, and delivering words they plainly don't understand in accents that are not their own. It's refreshing to find a younger person just being himself without a whole lot of pretending, and incorporating his generation's R&B textures into songs that have become parody through imitation and overuse.

    John

  13. #12

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    for me ..learning the musical history of not only the players but the genre itself gives a more robust understanding and respect to the music and the musicians that
    perform it.

    The blues evolution should be realized by those that wish to play it..it is integrated in almost every bit of american music of all genres

    Almost everyone that begins to play guitar finds those magical licks have a powerful feel..and many if not all professional musicians pay tribute to the
    early pioneers who may have known it was an oral tradition born in pain that gave us this "gift" of expression...

    a three note lick from Albert King can say more than a hundred shredding players playing "the blues in A"

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevebol
    I hope he can get the weight under some control.
    He's dropped about 100 pounds over the last two years. He knows he needs to get it under control and posts about it on his Instagram account.

  15. #14

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    There's a lot of good young musicians coming up across a variety of blues styles. Kingfish. Jontavious Willis. King Solomon Hicks. The list goes on.




  16. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    I usually don't try to kill joy threads, where people find joy in music.

    But gotta ask here .. Serious question

    What exactly is Kingfish's contribution here that improves on this? (Other than the occasional altered lick)

    Hi, L,
    Many musicians have "signature songs." No musician owns a song. Otherwise, why play "famous" standards from the past? Play live . . . Marinero

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, L,
    Many musicians have "signature songs." No musician owns a song. Otherwise, why play "famous" standards from the past? Play live . . . Marinero
    The song isn't my point.

    My question is what is his contribution to what BB and later Gary did that makes him great? To my ears its just noodling with the occasional altered lick thrown in as a pretense to originality and cutting edge. I just don't feel any pain in his performance

    That is my issue with the blues in 2020. There was this great music based of the hardship of days gone past that captured the spirit of the times.

    Punk did something similar for the hopelessness of 1977


    Doesn't really seem like there is a community to be found in struggle these days. Whether it is because no one is able to capture the hardship of the year that is 2020* in music and lyrics .. or because the spirit of times just is "If you struggle then you only have yourself to blame, you weak piece of shit"


    *Tho is 2020 really that bad? .. I mean compared to some of the years before 1945?

  18. #17

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    I like him a lot. There's a lot of stuff in his playing I hear, and not all of it comes from the blues directly...but he doesn't hide it and don a "musical costume," he lets it bubble through.

    Eric Gales has that quality too.

  19. #18
    "I just don't feel any pain in his performance" Lobomov

    Hi, L,
    You don't need pain . . . you need musicianship and creativity. I think the "starving/tortured artist" concept is a cliche. Brilliant artists in all genres like Heifitz, Rubenstein, Segovia, Casals, Wagner(Classical Music), Thomas Mann, Tolstoy; Hemingway, TS Eliot(literature); Wynton Marsalis, Miles Davis, Louis Armstrong, Nat Cole(Jazz); Chagall, Picasso, Renoir(Art), etc. defy this misconception. And, although the Blues and Jazz has had a lion-share of personal tragedies, it was their native intelligence and creativity that allowed them to bloom in these artforms, not their environment. Also, Jazz and Blues were considered a lowly art form ,at one time, and drew many of its artists from the lower income/improvished communities. However, again, it was their musicianship, intelligence, and creativity(genetic) that ruled the day. Some food for thought.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  20. #19

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    Yeah Kingfish, keeping the blues alive.

  21. #20
    Don't know if this is true but, if so, Kingfish hasn't done badly for himself.
    Play live . . . Marinero



    Christone Ingram Net Worth • Net Worth List

    www.networthlist.org › christone-ingram-net-worth-26...





  22. #21

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    I can understand the argument being made here. There is something about that gut-wrenching place that many of the original Blues greats came from, and how they pour it into each note. I am moved deeply by that type of blues as well. But, I can still appreciate musicans who play these same songs well, yet lack that depth of pain that for me, makes the blues so special.

    I guess it comes down to what a person is looking for in blues song. Can you be happy with some nice guitar tone, a good rhythm section, and some tasty playing, or do you need to get that spriritual healing that the old bluesmen delivered?

    Depending on my mood I can do both. At least Christone Kingfish is an honest artist. Please let me know when you can find another BB King or Muddy Waters and I will buy their songs right away!

  23. #22

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    Blues is the truth, happy or sad.

    --BB King

  24. #23
    "There is something about that gut-wrenching place that many of the original Blues greats came from, and how they pour it into each note. I am moved deeply by that type of blues as well. But, I can still appreciate musicans who play these same songs well, yet lack that depth of pain . . . " AlsoRan

    Hi, A,
    For the sake of a musical argument, can a listener perceive or quantify "pain" in a performance when listening in a blindfold test . . . especially if one doesn't know the performer? If so, how?
    Play live . . . Marinero

  25. #24

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    chune!

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    Please let me know when you can find another BB King or Muddy Waters and I will buy their songs right away!
    they out there but get no record deals or notoriety unless they doing rock/blues, shredding, high-octane modern/contemporary. Take Tim Lerch for instance, he can and did play some very authentic Chicago jump blues and there’s plenty others in clubs that are too authentic for the masses of modern sound$

    now I hope this is ok with Tim and one of my favorite Jimmy Rodgers tunes

    Last edited by BFrench; 11-27-2020 at 06:25 PM.

  27. #26

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    then there's the gone and great Sam Myers and Anson...now Tim, Sam and Anson that's some blues, they knew how to let it breath


  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by BFrench
    they out there but get no record deals or notoriety unless they doing rock/blues, shredding, high-octane modern/contemporary. Take Tim Lerch for instance, he can and did play some very authentic Chicago jump blues and there’s plenty others in clubs that are too authentic for the masses of modern sound$

    now I hope this is ok with Tim and one of my favorite Jimmy Rodgers tunes

    That was very good Blues playing, indeed. I have seen Tim Lerch's Jazz videos and he is good as that as well. Thanks. Loved his lines and sweet vibrato - reminded me of Otis Rush in many ways.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by BFrench
    then there's the gone and great Sam Myers and Anson...now Tim, Sam and Anson that's some blues, they knew how to let it breath

    Another great blues player. He lives and plays in my area. I plan to catch him one day. It is a bucket list item. Somehow, my schedules never lined up with his concert dates.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    "There is something about that gut-wrenching place that many of the original Blues greats came from, and how they pour it into each note. I am moved deeply by that type of blues as well. But, I can still appreciate musicans who play these same songs well, yet lack that depth of pain . . . " AlsoRan

    Hi, A,
    For the sake of a musical argument, can a listener perceive or quantify "pain" in a performance when listening in a blindfold test . . . especially if one doesn't know the performer? If so, how?
    Play live . . . Marinero
    So much of the reality of the artist is in the listener's perceptions, whether real or imagined - and it can be the difference between being super popular or just another good unsung good player out there.

    To be honest, being from Texas I have heard so many stories about how hard things were in the US, especially after the turn of the century and into the Great Depression.

    Many of the Blues artists I look up to were from that era and were on the bottom of society. There is something about that pain in their voices that is hard to replicate today by modern artists regardless of race. Plus, those guys had great voices, too, in addition to being great guitar players.

    Just my thoughts.

  31. #30

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    yep some really good players there...Sam and I went way back, I hung out with him quite a bit back in the early 70's, boy the stories I could tell...this one here you'd have to have been there...I took Sam to New Orleans when he had a job at Tipinias from where we were staying in Jackson Ms, On break standing outside this kid came up to Sam and said "Mr Myers I've been working on this lick you blow" so the kid pulls out a harp and blows a riff...Sam takes his harp and said "that's alright but does it go like that or like this" and proceeds to blow the *shi* out of the riff"... but like I said you'd had to have been there, it was so funny....Sam was legally blind and couldn't see nothing, I mean nothing but money and women, he saw those two things real good....oh and Sam started out as Howlin Wolf's drummer and damn what a drummer he was!

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    Another great blues player. He lives and plays in my area. I plan to catch him one day. It is a bucket list item. Somehow, my schedules never lined up with his concert dates.
    This video is just about perfect Blues playing when it comes to Slow Blues. How about this one performance - talk about Slow blues guitar playing and gut-wrenching singing. Probably not the best vocals but still convincing to me.


  33. #32

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    oh my goodness, no offense meant but we on two different planets when it comes to the blues for I thoroughly hate that sort of shredding playing, same as about 5 seconds is all I could take of SRV and the reason I would never care to listen to what kingfish does, just ain't my thing but I've got ah plenty to listen to that is...

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    This video is just about perfect Blues playing when it comes to Slow Blues. How about this one performance - talk about Slow blues guitar playing and gut-wrenching singing. Probably not the best vocals but still convincing to me.

    Funny, I like his singing more than his guitar playing (I find that tone kind of grating, and the playing itself pretty generic), but ultimately it's a matter of taste.

    John

  35. #34
    "Many of the Blues artists I look up to were from that era and were on the bottom of society. There is something about that pain in their voices that is hard to replicate today by modern artists regardless of race." AlsoRan

    Hi, AR,
    I understand your sentiment, however, as a musician, I need to quantify things more than a person's background/race when it relates to musical performance since, today, in the case of the Blues, or Jazz, color is not a credential for performance creativity but rather talent and mastery of genre. So, once again, your opinion is based on unsupported prejudice rather than musical ability and would be difficult to prove today in my aforementioned blindfold test. I have no personal animus here but rather the need for clarity and honesty concerning musical performance and how we perceive artists. Play live . . . after Covid . . . Marinero

    Check out these Blues Brothers.
    https://youtu.be/SeLddbrzsHk

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by BFrench
    oh my goodness, no offense meant but we on two different planets when it comes to the blues for I thoroughly hate that sort of shredding playing, same as about 5 seconds is all I could take of SRV and the reason I would never care to listen to what kingfish does, just ain't my thing but I've got ah plenty to listen to that is...
    Ha! ha!

    It's alright to have your own taste! For me, I can get into Sam Myers and Anson (thanks for the great story on Sam!), I like that style the best - reminds me of Otis Rush.

    I am also an 80's metal guy, so there are certain songs that they call "Blues" that can still get me going and can stir my soul in a different way. I guess this song was one of them. Gary Moore, Smokin' Joe Kubek (whom I did see live before he died) and Eric Clapton also come to mind. But, that's just my little world in a world of billions.

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    "Many of the Blues artists I look up to were from that era and were on the bottom of society. There is something about that pain in their voices that is hard to replicate today by modern artists regardless of race." AlsoRan

    Hi, AR,
    I understand your sentiment, however, as a musician, I need to quantify things more than a person's background/race when it relates to musical performance since, today, in the case of the Blues, or Jazz, color is not a credential for performance creativity but rather talent and mastery of genre. So, once again, your opinion is based on unsupported prejudice rather than musical ability and would be difficult to prove today in my aforementioned blindfold test. I have no personal animus here but rather the need for clarity and honesty concerning musical performance and how we perceive artists. Play live . . . after Covid . . . Marinero

    Check out these Blues Brothers.
    https://youtu.be/SeLddbrzsHk
    You are correct about it being unsupported prejudice. I think taste in music is based on many personal prejudices (and I am not talking about racial prejudices only, but even prejudice on an artist style of dress or hairstyle) that people have. To support this, I would ask you to look at what people spend their money to hear. As you have so aptly indicated in some of your past threads, the music does not have to be good, it just has to be "what the people want."

    So if Prince Harry, who has arguably had everything handed to him, were to sing the Blues about being in a welfare line, it would not carry the validity that Albert King would bring to the song. And if he sounded really good and played a great guitar solo, it would still ring a little hollow with many, including myself. I guess its as much about performance as it is the musicianship. Part of performance is presentation and "apparent authenticity." Fakes, as I define the term, unless they are very good, normally don't last too long.

    And I will end it with a spin on your wonderful trademark declaration: "Please somebody, Play Live! (so I can go and see and hear you, once COVID is finally done)!"

  38. #37
    Or some hardcore R@B . . . . Play live . . . M


  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    Funny, I like his singing more than his guitar playing (I find that tone kind of grating, and the playing itself pretty generic), but ultimately it's a matter of taste.

    John
    A buddy of mine who loves only R&B hates distortion, including the fuzz/overdrive on Walter's guitar. That let me know how certain people's ears can find distortion annoying, where I love the way it grinds and claws at you when it is done a certain way, especially on the screaming bends.

    But my buddy would agree with you. Sweet distortion, like an old Isley Brother's guitar would probably be alright to him, but nothing that is too jagged of a sine wave.