Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Posts 26 to 50 of 50
  1. #26

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug
    Banjo is a standing joke for many. In Finland, they say the world's most beautiful sound is when you throw a banjo in a trash can and it bumps into an accordion. Well, I play in an old boys' band where, soon, I'll be the only one under 80. Our typical audiences are quite senior, too. Whenever I do the banjo intro to "Hello Dolly", the audience just lights up. Trouble is, the next gen geriatrics probably prefer "Johnny B Goode" or "Day Tripper". While I'm OK with those, the rest of the band isn't.
    In had once an idea of a dixie band which would play all the classic jazz pieces which where made AFTER 1930s in dixie style. Like Koko, Air Mail Special, Limehouse Blues, Giant Steps, So What, Ornithology, Epistrophy, Lonely Woman etc etc. Might be fun to play, at least! I reserved a banjo for myself, of course.

    Hmm... maybe I should push this idea forward...

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

    User Info Menu

    Wish I could join in with the Tuba.

  4. #28

    User Info Menu

    For many years there was a trio that played New Orleans Square in Disneyland (calif).

    Clarinet, bass and 6 string banjo. That guy sounded great. Tuned like a guitar.

    I've always wanted one, but every one I've ever seen was a low quality instrument.

  5. #29

    User Info Menu

    Once you learn it, chords on instruments tuned in fifths are easier. You don't have that wonky string tuned differently, which necessitates changing fingerings if you change strings. You can move a 5th my just moving to adjacent strings, up or down.

  6. #30

    User Info Menu

    From Finland



    Then there's this


  7. #31

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug
    Banjo is a standing joke for many. In Finland, they say the world's most beautiful sound is when you throw a banjo in a trash can and it bumps into an accordion...
    A variation on that banjo joke ... when I first took up the banjo in the 1970s, from my older brother (a jazz guitarist)...

    He asked if I knew what jazz musicians call a "perfect pitch?" I said no.
    He said it's when the banjo lands squarely in the dumpster without touching any sides on its way down.

  8. #32

    User Info Menu

    FYI:
    How To Tune A Tenor Banjo To Chicago Tuning
    (I still think I'll try standard 5ths tuning 1st, though.)

  9. #33

    User Info Menu

    I took Woody's advice and just bought a 1967 Vega Wonder Plectrum Banjo!
    Elderly's price seemed a bit high ($800), but they say it's in excellent condition and comes with a new-looking HSC.
    The other ones I found (Reverb et al) needed some work; this one doesn't (I hope).
    I wanted a Vega for sentimental reasons, and this one was made in Boston a year or 2 before the company was sold to Martin.
    I'll probably tune it Chicago-style (D G B E), but I might try re-entrant (d G B E) as I'd just need to substitute a spare plain .011 or .012 for the 4th string. I'm not really getting this to play dixieland or older-style jazz; I just thought it might be fun to play whatever songs I like with a totally different sonority. Anyway, here it is (or will be when it gets here):
    6-String Banjo?-vega-wonder-plectrum-1967-exc-jpg

  10. #34

    User Info Menu

    Looks like a nice catch. Congratulations - enjoy!

  11. #35

    User Info Menu

    Congrats! Too bad that one wasn't on the market when I did my long-distance due diligence between several US vendors. My early '70s Fender Artist Plectrum, from Elderly as well, was markedly more expensive. They claimed an expert setup but the skin was over-tight on mine. Instead of a nice banjo ring, I got a lot of left-hand squeal and shrill, outright howling harmonics. Loosening the skin didn't help, as it was "dead" from excessive tension. It takes some getting used to hearing the skin's resonant frequency, tapping it with a rubber-tip pencil when the strings are not on. It's supposed to be between G and A. The Banjo Hangout is a great source of info and - just as this Forum - divergent opinions.
    Last edited by Gitterbug; 06-03-2020 at 04:14 PM.

  12. #36

    User Info Menu

    Arrived yesterday, and it's great!
    It has a certain amount of wear befitting a 53 year old instrument - which for me adds to its charm - but it plays, sounds, and looks terrific. (OK, well it doesn't always sound terrific yet; I have to learn how it likes to be played.)
    Looks like it was bought new, played moderately hard for a few years and then kept in its case under a bed for most of its life.
    Boy, these things are heavy and structurally complicated! I believe I have an interesting journey ahead of me.

  13. #37

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Karol
    Arrived yesterday, and it's great!
    It has a certain amount of wear befitting a 53 year old instrument - which for me adds to its charm - but it plays, sounds, and looks terrific. (OK, well it doesn't always sound terrific yet; I have to learn how it likes to be played.)
    Looks like it was bought new, played moderately hard for a few years and then kept in its case under a bed for most of its life.
    Boy, these things are heavy and structurally complicated! I believe I have an interesting journey ahead of me.
    Notwithstanding the cheap jokes, a banjo is a thing of pure joy. Have a blast!

  14. #38

    User Info Menu

    The jokes are cheap because they're so easy.

  15. #39

    User Info Menu

    The idea of leveraging guitar technique is good - as a classical player, I got a gut(nylon) fretless gourd banjo, analogous to mid-19th century instruments and not far removed from some likely African ancestors such as the akonting. Then I cheat using classical RH technique rather than authentic clawhammer. There were a number of banjo methods from the mid 1800s that documented the music of the period, much of which was associated with minstrelsy


  16. #40

    User Info Menu

    The Banjitar is also great for playing Gershwin's music because he wrote quite alot of Banjo parts in pieces like "Rhapsody in Blue". The Banjitar Harp:1927 Paramount Guitar Banjo Harp is basically a Wooden top Banjitar that was developed in the transition period from Banjo to Guitar.

    Another hybrid instrument that resulted in Guitarists & Banjoists crossing over is the Tenor Guitar:Paramount "Tenor Harp" Wooden Top Tenor Banjo c. 1925
    – Jakes Main Street Music
    which is a Tenor Banjo neck on a Guitar body. What they usually do with Banjitars is they increase the body size by at least an inch to help the lower pitches resonate better.

  17. #41

    User Info Menu

    6-String Banjo?-058c5d84-60c7-4fe9-89c0-6fd1bf23e457-jpeg

  18. #42

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Karol
    To further facilitate social distancing, I'm thinking of getting a six-string banjo - this one: Goodtime 6 String Banjos – Deering(R) Banjo Company.
    My rationale is that since I play Guitar, Tenor Uke, and Bass, and don't want to learn new fingering patterns, the 6-string might be better than a Tenor or Plectrum. (Of course, if I got a Tenor tuned in standard 5ths and got familiar with it, that would set me up nicely for a subsequent Mandolin purchase!) I don't fingerpick particularly well, but I do a really good imitation of it with a flatpick. I'm also thinking I might consider doing "Nashville" high-strung tuning. Any thoughts? Go ahead - take your best shot!
    Usually the Banjitar body is a bit larger than a 5 String Banjo body to help the lower pitches resonate, Dean made them so that the lower pitches sound great because alot of Banjitars with Normal Gauged Guitar Strings sound like toys.

  19. #43

    User Info Menu

    The Banjitar was used for Guitarists to compete with the Horns, & the Tenor Guitar (Tenor Banjo neck on Guitar body), was used in the "Transition period from Banjo to Guitar" when Banjo player switched to Guitar.

  20. #44

    User Info Menu

    Because the Banjitar has 6 Full Length Strings, you can play in every key without re-tuning & you can use your Guitar capo too (same as the Guitar). You can even tune the instrument down a half step to facilitate playing flat keys.

  21. #45

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Karol
    To further facilitate social distancing, I'm thinking of getting a six-string banjo - this one: Goodtime 6 String Banjos – Deering(R) Banjo Company.
    My rationale is that since I play Guitar, Tenor Uke, and Bass, and don't want to learn new fingering patterns, the 6-string might be better than a Tenor or Plectrum. (Of course, if I got a Tenor tuned in standard 5ths and got familiar with it, that would set me up nicely for a subsequent Mandolin purchase!) I don't fingerpick particularly well, but I do a really good imitation of it with a flatpick. I'm also thinking I might consider doing "Nashville" high-strung tuning. Any thoughts? Go ahead - take your best shot!
    A 6 String Guitar Banjo might be a good fit cause it's the same strings & tuning as a Guitar but you've got a Banjo sound. What they usually do is that the 6 String Banjo body is a Tad bit deeper than a 5 String Banjo this way the lower pitches sound more Banjoey.

  22. #46

    User Info Menu

    I got a Plectrum and tuned it 'Chicago' style; see Post #33.

  23. #47

    User Info Menu

    6-String Banjo?-banjo-lessons-jpg

  24. #48

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by s11141827
    The Banjitar is also great for playing Gershwin's music because he wrote quite alot of Banjo parts in pieces like "Rhapsody in Blue". The Banjitar Harp:1927 Paramount Guitar Banjo Harp is basically a Wooden top Banjitar that was developed in the transition period from Banjo to Guitar.

    Another hybrid instrument that resulted in Guitarists & Banjoists crossing over is the Tenor Guitar:Paramount "Tenor Harp" Wooden Top Tenor Banjo c. 1925
    – Jakes Main Street Music
    which is a Tenor Banjo neck on a Guitar body. What they usually do with Banjitars is they increase the body size by at least an inch to help the lower pitches resonate better.

  25. #49

    User Info Menu

    I've owned a short-scale tenor banjo for 40 years, it's paid for itself many times over. Chicago tuning with heavy strings, it works very well in pit settings, and its mellow tone is actually very welcome by most conductors and even trad jazzers. Nice instrument, beautiful resonator, might be a Bacon. I never play it at home.

  26. #50

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz
    I've owned a short-scale tenor banjo for 40 years, it's paid for itself many times over. Chicago tuning with heavy strings, it works very well in pit settings, and its mellow tone is actually very welcome by most conductors and even trad jazzers. Nice instrument, beautiful resonator, might be a Bacon. I never play it at home.
    Please tell me what gauges of strings you're using to tune your tenor banjo Chicago style!