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  1. #1

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    First one:

    Oh Susanna,
    (fingerstyle) on unplugged
    Squier Telecaster MIJ E6...


    (click on picture will redirect you to blogspot.com page)





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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladan
    First one:

    Oh Susanna,
    (fingerstyle) on unplugged
    Squier Telecaster MIJ E6...


    (click on picture will redirect you to blogspot.com page)




    That's fine finger-picking, but i's not "Travis" picking, which is a specific technique. Merle Travis used only his thumb and index finger, rested his other fingers on the guitar top), and kept a steady beat on the bass strings. This is a really good example, with close-ups of his right hand:



    Doc Watson also Travis picked (though he was better known as a flat picker), and gives a great lesson here:



    John

  4. #3

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    That is nice fingerpicking. If you are interested in exploring Travis picking I can highly recommend this book. Mark Hanson is an excellent player and teacher:


    The Art of Contemporary Travis Picking: Learn the Alternating-Bass Fingerpicking Style https://www.amazon.com/dp/0936799323..._JnWQEb59BHB9B


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    That's fine finger-picking, but i's not "Travis" picking, which is a specific technique. Merle Travis used only his thumb and index finger, rested his other fingers on the guitar top), and kept a steady beat on the bass strings. This is a really good example, with close-ups of his right hand:

    Doc Watson also Travis picked (though he was better known as a flat picker), and gives a great lesson here:

    John
    John, thank you for listening and for compliment. Appreciated!
    Also thank you for clarification about style features and terminology. Unfortunately, it is too late to change the title, but I will try to include "pseudo" in title of all my future postings to this thread.

    Regarding features of style, I actually do keep steady beat in bass with my thumb, only bass line is the same as melody. In other words, I play melody on bass strings, with my thumb, but I only pluck in steady beat, 1/4, the rest are pull-offs and hammer-ons.

    In that clip I see Mr. Travis playing steady bass beat while he's singing, but occasionally departing from it, using his thumb to play some licks during instrumental parts of tune.

    The other clip I glanced through, randomly clicking time line. Mr. Watson is also singing the tune.

    Seams steady bass, alternating btw 3 bottom strings goes with singing, probably with melody being played on top 3 strings, too?


    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett
    That is nice fingerpicking. If you are interested in exploring Travis picking I can highly recommend this book. Mark Hanson is an excellent player and teacher:


    The Art of Contemporary Travis Picking: Learn the Alternating-Bass Fingerpicking Style

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Thank you rlrhett, for listening and kind comment!
    Last edited by Vladan; 04-30-2020 at 01:57 PM. Reason: Note: It seams subtitles are not functional any more?

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladan
    John, thank you for listening and for compliment. Appreciated!
    Also thank you for clarification about style features and terminology. Unfortunately, it is too late to change the title, but I will try to include "pseudo" in title of all my future postings to this thread.

    Regarding features of style, I actually do keep steady beat in bass with my thumb, only bass line is the same as melody. In other words, I play melody on bass strings, with my thumb, but I only pluck in steady beat, 1/4, the rest are pull-offs and hammer-ons.

    In that clip I see Mr. Travis playing steady bass beat while he's singing, but occasionally departing from it, using his thumb to play some licks during instrumental parts of tune.

    The other clip I glanced through, randomly clicking time line. Mr. Watson is also singing the tune.

    Seams steady bass, alternating btw 3 bottom strings goes with singing, probably with melody being played on top 3 strings, too?




    Thank you rlrhett, for listening and kind comment!
    Alternating bass, mixed in with licks and bits of walking, arpeggiated melody, with one or two inner voices moving around -- the great ones all do that in varying degrees to create the effect of a whole band accompanying a vocal. Check out some Blind Blake, Reverend Gary (both are pretty mind-blowing), and Mississippi John Hurt, and more modern guys like Leo Kottke. And, yeah, you gotta sing

    John

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    Alternating bass, ... And, yeah, you gotta sing

    John
    Thank you. Although I am not a singing guy, If I find enough time, someday I'll check at least some of suggested.

    Sent from My Blog Page

  8. #7

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    And here is direct YouTube link, if someone would hear it, but do not like clicking more than one link:


  9. #8

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    This one is a bit more complex than previous. I still play bass/ melody/ response combo lines on low strings, using thumb, with only one fill in lick on top strings. Picking pattern is practically the same as in previous attempt, something like this:

    In 4/4
    Beat 1: Bass and chord together
    Beats 2 and 3: alternating thumb and finger on 1/8 notes
    Beat 4: Bass only for 1/4,
    There are some variation, breaks and whatever, but not much, as I am struggling to keep the thing from falling apart:

    When the Saints Go Marching In
    key of E, C shape with capo on 4th fret,
    on unplugged Squier Telecaster MIJ E6...


    (click on picture will redirect you to blogspot.com page)




  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladan
    This one is a bit more complex than previous. I still play bass/ melody/ response combo lines on low strings, using thumb, with only one fill in lick on top strings. Picking pattern is practically the same as in previous attempt, something like this:

    In 4/4
    Beat 1: Bass and chord together
    Beats 2 and 3: alternating thumb and finger on 1/8 notes
    Beat 4: Bass only for 1/4,
    There are some variation, breaks and whatever, but not much, as I am struggling to keep the thing from falling apart:

    When the Saints Go Marching In
    key of E, C shape with capo on 4th fret,
    on unplugged Squier Telecaster MIJ E6...


    (click on picture will redirect you to blogspot.com page)



    That's a good one. Lots of voices in motion ...

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    That's a good one. Lots of voices in motion ...
    Thank You.

  12. #11

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    And direct link to Youtube:


  13. #12

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    Another one from same series.
    First I did it in similar manner to previous two (in above posts), sort of bluegrass, rhythmic bass ..., but then I realized it is too good of a song to be wasted that easily, therefore ...

    Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep, in slow Afro, solo guitar
    - composed by Lally Stott (RIP), all credits to his legacy
    - the best known version by Middle of the Road


    Click on picture will redirect you to my blog page




    ... and because I realized people can not keep attention to watch and listen for more than about one minute,
    therefore loosing on the interesting parts that come later in the song, here is a short content list:

    00:00 - 00:57 _ Verse, speeding up, with rhythmic variations and bridge ...........................
    00:57 - 01:41 _ 1st chorus, 2 times, normal melody then octave down, with ending lick....
    01:41 - End _ _2nd chorus, 2 times, first is step up but in lower octave, then upper octave
    ...................... with more chordal variations and another ending lick .................................

  14. #13

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    Direct YouTube link:



    BTW, if anybody's interested, that thing under capo is piece of business card.
    The purpose is to lessen the pressure of capo on strings so to prevent tuning go sharp.
    Padding between string and fret is effectively decreasing fret height, so no matter how hard the string is pressed, it can only be "that much" tensed.


    Lesser the difference between padding and fret height, less will the resulting note pitch depend on other factors but fret position.