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  1. #1

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    The B-Side of the "In The Still of the Night" by the Five Satins was this.

    Pretty effing bad. Starts at 0:55




    https://junkee.com/worst-solo-twitter-meme/251064

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Itd actually work if his timing was better.

  4. #3

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    Is this what inspired Neil Young on Cinnamon Girl?

  5. #4

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    I use that same set of notes when I improvise, too.

  6. #5

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    I've never heard a sax sound like a kazoo. Amazing.

  7. #6

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    Pretty bad, really.

    But I could do much worse...

  8. #7

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    Cant give a recording, just a story.

    A talented young student, already very very good soloist. They had a big event, big big band. Many singers. Great list of good pop music. And he had 1 single solo in the whole set. He overblew it and couldn't recover fast enough before his part was over.
    This was recorded with 2 crane cameras, uber embarrassing for him.. but of course, everyone understood the issue. NP! Just funny in a few years time

  9. #8

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    I love it

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    Is this what inspired Neil Young on Cinnamon Girl?
    That's pretty funny!

  11. #10

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    Not bad for falling-down drunk!

  12. #11

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    Does Bill Clinton count?

    Oh, I thought you meant the worst sex solo.

    NEVER MIND...

  13. #12

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    Seriously, I have nothing against free playing---if someone can play. And plenty can. But the minute Albert Ayler gets out of the melody I head for Q-tips, digitalis---and if I weren't a peaceable man, a gun...

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrblues View Post
    Pretty bad, really.

    But I could do much worse...
    I could too, and have, but this saw the light of day on a recording by a popular group.

    The Five Satins were a doo-wop group so I'm thinking the sax solo was played by a studio pro and not, as sometimes happened with rock bands doing original material, a band member who just wasn't very good.

    Here's their biggest hit, "In The Still of the Night." The sax solo isn't great but it's fine.


  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    Is this what inspired Neil Young on Cinnamon Girl?
    Which, ironically, is the best guitar solo ever. One note - the right one.
    Last edited by citizenk74; 04-22-2020 at 06:49 PM. Reason: Correction

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74 View Post
    Which, ironically, is the best guitar solo ever. one note - the right one.
    And the reason for one note wasn't because that is the only one Neil knows how to play.

  17. #16

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    Here's the right concept.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    Is this what inspired Neil Young on Cinnamon Girl?
    Well, I would put his Southern Man in that category too, partly because it's a much longer solo. You may recall the great Lester Young's use of "worry notes." Charlie Christian did the same. But Neil Young takes the idea to a whole new level, not for the best.

  19. #18

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    This reminds me of the terrible harmonica solo in Aretha Franklin's otherwise excellent version of Evil Gal Blues. It was performed by Buddy Lucas, the tenor sax player on the session. He later became well known as a harpist but judging by this recording, it must have been one of his first efforts on the instrument (solo at 1'44"):


  20. #19

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    ...and then there's this:


  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    The B-Side of the "In The Still of the Night" by the Five Satins was this.

    Pretty effing bad. Starts at 0:55
    Hmm.. considering only a single note is applied I wouldn't consider it so much a saxophone solo as a rhythm break. Sort of like when drummers do solos.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59 View Post
    Well, I would put his Southern Man in that category too, partly because it's a much longer solo. You may recall the great Lester Young's use of "worry notes." Charlie Christian did the same. But Neil Young takes the idea to a whole new level, not for the best.
    I always assumed Neil had just listen to Grant Green's No. 1 Green Street before going into the studio and, as you noted, took the concept to a whole new level, with a passion!


  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf View Post
    Seriously, I have nothing against free playing---if someone can play. And plenty can. But the minute Albert Ayler gets out of the melody I head for Q-tips, digitalis---and if I weren't a peaceable man, a gun...
    yipes..in defense of albert ayler...harsh words for tranes fave!!! ...a beautiful cat..dead at 34!!

    he had been playing pro since 16... with great blues harp man little walter in 1952

    trane was the one who got ayler signed to impulse records

    ayler also was chosen to play at tranes funeral!

    cheers

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by PMB View Post
    ...and then there's this:

    He's doing it his way.

  25. #24

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    No one ever bought this record for the flip. Back then, record companies would put throwaway songs on the flip to avoid splitting sales. Sometimes they just had the house band fake an instrumental.

    Danny W.

  26. #25

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    I was going to post a video of Putin's recent visit to Saudi Arabia - the Saudi's rendition of the Russian national anthem made him wince, but then I remembered this...


  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Itd actually work if his timing was better.
    Instantly reminds me of Alix Combelle ( i think) on a django track who does something similar and its one of my favourite solos, but then his timing is great. at 3 mins 22


  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59 View Post
    Well, I would put his Southern Man in that category too, partly because it's a much longer solo. You may recall the great Lester Young's use of "worry notes." Charlie Christian did the same. But Neil Young takes the idea to a whole new level, not for the best.
    An explication of the "worry" note concept in Charlie Christian's playing.

    How to Play Guitar Like Charlie Christian - JamieHolroydGuitar.com - Jamie Holroyd Guitar

  29. #28

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    I actually think Young's solo on Cinnamon Girl is extremely effective, and at 2:58, it's hardly harshing your mellow too much. His incessant solos over Down by the River, by contrast, make it one of the most overrated guitar songs out there. I would also put Creedence's I Heard It through the Grapevine and Skynyrd's Free Bird in that category as well--could have been cut in half easily.

    I think I remember reading somewhere that Dweezil Zappa thought Lou Reed had one of the worst guitar solos over...I believe on his Mistrial album. (Of course some people would say Metal Machine Music was the main crime against musicality.) Interestingly, Reed disparaged Frank Zappa early in their careers, but later came to respect him and actually gave the introduction to Zappa being inducted into the RNRHOF. Worth a read if you're interested...

    It's very rare in life to know someone who affects things; changes them in a positive way. I've been lucky enough to have known some in my life: Andy Warhol, Doc Pomus. People whose vision and integrity was such that it moved the world a bit. People who, through the articulation of their talents and intelligence, were able to leave things better than they had found them. People who were not only not in it for the money, to paraphrase Frank Zappa. Frank Zappa was such a person and of the many regrets I have in life, not knowing him a lot better is one of them.

    Whether writing symphonies, satirical broadsides or casting a caustic glow across the frontier of madness that makes up the American political landscape; whether testifying before Congress to put the PMRC in its rightful lowly place, or acting as a cultural conduit for President Vaclav Havel and the Czech government, Frank was a force for reason and honesty in the business deficient in those areas. As we reward some with money for the amusement they supply to the cultural masses, I think the induction of Frank Zappa in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame distinguishes the Hall as well as the inductee. [applause]

    Musicians usually cannot speak. That's why they communicate through their instruments. But Frank was one who could. And because music is pure, the musician is pure as well and when Frank spoke he demonstrated the power of purity. Who will do that now? I admired Frank greatly and I know he admired me. It gives me great pleasure to give this award to his daughter, Moon Zappa.

    Whether he was writing symphonies, satiric broadsides or casting a caustic glow across the frontier of madness that makes up the American political landscape Frank was a force for reason and honesty in a business deficient in these areas.
    Last edited by Doctor Jeff; 04-23-2020 at 05:07 PM.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    It was eventually on an album as well.
    I think you're right that this was a throwaway---they didn't put much thought into the lyric and this was a vocal band---but still, it's a terrible solo.
    In agreement with that.

    I led what we called a rhythm & blues group (we'd now call it doo wop) in the late '50's to mid-'60's and had a large collection of records, not all of them classics.

    On this one the overdubbed band apparently gave up at the bridge:



    Danny W.

  31. #30

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    Here is the story of the sax player:

    RANDALL BEACH: Vinny played sax. The Five Satins needed a solo. The rest was history - New Haven Register

    and of the producer:

    The Standord Records Story - Various Artists | Songs, Reviews, Credits | AllMusic

    TL;DR: Marty Kugell, a teenager with a two-track tape machine, recorded the song in the basement of a local catholic elementary school. Vinny Mazzetto, a congregant at the church that housed the elementary school and a local amateur musician, agreed to put in a word with the priest to use the basement if he could play sax.

    Originally, on Kugell's own label, The Jones Girl was the A side, and Still of the Night was the B side. Then it was re-released by another small label, with the sides reversed. It was obviously not produced by professionals.

    Vinny's fee for the recording just covered his entrance fee to the musicians' union.

  32. #31

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    Great story

    He probably got paid more than any of the Satins, of whom there were only four on the record.

    Danny W.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    Is this what inspired Neil Young on Cinnamon Girl?
    I see what you mean, but I think Neil's was more in time whereas this sounds so cringey
    How was that put on vinyl ?

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ukena View Post
    Here is the story of the sax player.
    Great info. Thank you. I retract anything bad I said about the player. Not a pro, just doing his best.

  35. #34

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    This thread had something nagging at me and I finally remembered what it was:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Saxphony-Ho...c&sr=1-1-fkmr0

    There in the sleeves notes is the story of Jimmy "One Note" Wright along with five excellent honking R'n'B tunes.

    He certainly knows where to place that one note!



    Derek

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger View Post
    This thread had something nagging at me and I finally remembered what it was:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Saxphony-Ho...c&sr=1-1-fkmr0

    There in the sleeves notes is the story of Jimmy "One Note" Wright along with five excellent honking R'n'B tunes.

    He certainly knows where to place that one note!



    Derek
    That is pure genius!

  37. #36

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    Adam Neely did video about this, that popped up in my YouTube feed just now. (It's worth a listen---going back to Illinois Jacquet's one-note solo on Lionel Hampton's "Flying Home" in 1942.)


  38. #37

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    Thanks for that link, MarkRhodes. Adam Neely's take on this solo is terrific, and the video is fun to watch.

    I especially like that he points out that it is an alternate take, and that there exists another take in which the sax solo would never have made a list of worst solos ever.

  39. #38

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    I really dug the Adam neely Video on this. Especially the fact that He talked a good bit about Big Jay Mcneely, who is one of my Personal favorites. I think these honkers do are often overlooked in Jazz history/education.

  40. #39

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    You know Wes references that one note sax solo style in his playing - you do the false fingering thing where you play the same pitch on two strings.... (usually a Bb) and then you have to slide or even bend it a little out of tune if you play it with three fingers and it’s just vibe in a can. I used that one to death on dance gigs.

    definitely something about it. I think Prez started that style?

    check 1:30


  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    You know Wes references that one note sax solo style in his playing - you do the false fingering thing where you play the same pitch on two strings.... (usually a Bb) and then you have to slide or even bend it a little out of tune if you play it with three fingers and it’s just vibe in a can. I used that one to death on dance gigs.
    T-Bone Walker did that a lot. (Around 1:12 on the video: the start of a chorus.)

    This recording is from 1950 but T-Bone started recording in 1929. "Strollin' With Bones" is not first-use but favorite example (and better recorded than much of his earlier work.)
    BB King did this too and he got it from T-Bone.

    Chuck Berry did too but I think he got it from Carl Hogan (who played with Louis Jordan) is where Chuck got it. (That's something I read somewhere, perhaps in one of Dave Rubin's Guitar Player columns.) Chuck (and Carl) did it a lot with double stops.


  42. #41

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    Might as well add some Carl Hogan from his days with Louis Jordan. (BB King played this song too-----BB played a LOT of songs Louis Jordan recorded.)

    Carl's intro (this was in 1946) gave Chuck Berry a lot of signature stuff.
    The solo comes at 2:15, late in the song. It's a tasty 12-bar solo indeed. Double stops is something you don't get from a sax...


  43. #42

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    Here's Nino Tempo using the same technique but what a difference! Hope you enjoy?



    Good playing . . . Marinero

    P.S. I wonder what the guy at the table thought when Nino was honking his horn at his girlfriend????