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  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by pauln
    All four where highly influential to me.


    Clapton
    I liked his early period with Cream, a strong establishment of what the sound of blues and rock would sound like after; I think his best solo was really Sunshine of Your Love.
    He seems to have peaked early and gradually forgotten how to play as time went on after that, can't stand anything he's done since the early 70s.


    Page
    I liked the first Led Zep record the best. Page went on to show that he was very prolific in different styles, if a bit sloppy, and opened a lot of avenues for rock to progress into different directions, but those weren't my directions.


    Beck
    I liked Rough and Ready (1971), had some jazz influence. Some of his other early stuff I liked, but he kind of went down a path of inventing and adopting a collection of peculiar techniques to make odd sounds and sound effects that I just don't appreciate.


    Hendix
    Not sure what was going on with him. I had a record he did in 1966 that was horrible, as in he did not sound like he knew how to even play the guitar yet. But just a few years later was Band of Gypsies, which I think was his best playing... transcendent playing, awe inspiring playing, I can't say too much the degree to which I loved it. Somehow he had not only mastered the guitar but invented a whole new way of playing the instrument that transformed the thing into a mystical musical experience.
    I have yet to hear anything played by anyone since that even breaks the seal on whatever magical influence he invoked on that record.


    So, in summary, I liked the early work of Clapton, Page, and Beck, but all three drifted into areas that did not hold me. From my perspective, the profile of all three peaked early and eventually lost the bubble. In contrast, Hendrix grew more amazing with time and peaked shortly before he passed.



    If you haven't heard the Band of Gypsies,
    give the whole thing a listen and let me know what you think...
    Well said. I mostly agree. Clapton peaked early. Led Zeppelin I is my favorite even though derivative and less creative than what followed. Hendrix was unique, and I was at the Band of Gypsies New Year's Eve show. Beck never did it for me.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by princeplanet
    IMVHO.....

    There were better Rock players in their era (Steve Hunter and Dick Wagner to name just 2). Hendrix was special cos he made you really feel something, but musically and technically was quite limited, despite what his rabid fans will say. Clapton and Page, box pentatonic noodling.... but quite good at it and could write tunes to suit.

    Beck was always more adventurous and cleverer, even dipped into Jazz fusion in a good way (mostly). Heck, for Blow by Blow alone, I say he wins ...
    There may have been "better" but I was focusing on the most acclaimed. I will check out your two faves, although the fact that they're both associated primarily with Alice Cooper and Lou Reed suggests an obscure, narrow, esoteric view.

  4. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by gitrman
    I thought this was a JAZZ guitar website.
    I thought this was a jazz guitar website where many of the people playing jazz guitar now (1) played other kinds of music in their lives and/or (2) have been interested in other kinds of music in their lives.

  5. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Karol
    I'm not going to pick one, but I remember back in college my guitar-playing friends and I thought of Beck, Clapton, and Hendrix as the triumvirate of rock guitarists - whenever one of them came out with a new album, he became the "best". Of course, the other guys didn't know much about my triumvirate: Charlie, Django, and Wes.
    Yes, they were the triumvirate of rock guitarists in the 1960s. But you were a man ahead of your time. I am older and wiser now. My guitar duo now is Django and Charlie, followed by Wes.

  6. #55

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    Okay... a Stevie Wonder son dedicated to Roy... IMHO the best song recorded by JB..
    I would wager that the playing on this song has as much "jazz" as "rock" but
    is incredible nonetheless.

    Also, can't believe nobody has posted a Joe Beck video yet (it's a jazz site no?)

  7. #56

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    Can't remember where I read it, but Miles and Jimi were planning on recording together. Miles is telling Jim about the diminished scale and Jimi says " Miles, i don't know the diminished scale". Miles in his raspy voice says "don't worry, I'll show you".

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59
    Yes, they were the triumvirate of rock guitarists in the 1960s. But you were a man ahead of your time. I am older and wiser now. My guitar duo now is Django and Charlie, followed by Wes.
    I’m with Phil. They were some of my heroes growing up, along with Alvin Lee, Terry Kath of Chicago, and Steve Howe. My new heroes are Barney Kessel, Jimmy Bruno, Frank Vignola, Tommy Emmanuel, Jimmy Raney and Joscho Stephan, to name a few.

    Of your original list Beck was probably my favorite guitarist, but Zeppelin my co favorite band.

  9. #58

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    Preferences are likely generation dependent, especially for those, like me, who grew up in the 1960s. My heroes were John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers (with Eric Clapton) and (Fresh) Cream, then Jimi Hendrix, Electric Ladyland in particular. Jef Beck, in fact only for his first single Hi-ho Silverlining and Truth. Led Zeppelin/Jimi Page was a little too late for me and too loud. Bought their records, but never connected to that, as I already had moved to different kinds of music.

    I think it makes a difference in preferences wether you grew up with these guys and your musical taste was formed by them. I still can listen to Bluesbreakers and Fresh Cream. The original vinyl records of course!

  10. #59

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    I was pretty guitar aware at an early age because both my father and mother played. By the time I was four or five, I was glued to the TV, watching local phenom, Roy Clark, tear it up on the Jimmy Dean Show in Washington, DC. Clark--in that pre-Hee Haw era Clark was a Fender toting hot guitar picker.

    We moved to SoCal and I watched Joe Maphis and The Collins Kids each week. I knew that I needed a Mosrite double-neck guitar to be for real. I'd also see the other hot-shot solid-body, SoCal players regularly on regional TV shows. (This was all in the pre-Beatles era.)

    Then two things happened: (1) the British Invasion, and (2) my father said, "You really need to be listening to the jazz players--Kessel, Ellis, Montgomery, Mottola, Caiola, Django, and Charlie Christian (were some of the ones he picked out for me). A third thing: I moved over from baritone uke and tenor banjo, to the guitar as my hands got large enough to deal with a six-string neck. I began studying guitar. Right away, I noticed that the songs by the Beatles had a lot in common with the show tunes that the jazz guitar guys were putting through their paces. Lennon/McCartney songs weren't "Gloria" by The Them, in terms of structure.

    Things were coming along just fine--I was learning my parent's Great American Songbook stuff and they were learning Beatles tunes--and then, BAM! I got a radio that had both AM and FM bands. The first time I tuned in an FM station, I heard a song "Hey Joe," by Jimi Hendrix. Uh, oh. This was seriously different. The guitar was looser, louder, and way more soulful than anything I had heard to that point. It made _all_ of the Brit Invasion stuff sound too on the beat. It was like growing up on a diet of George M. Cohan and then hearing Louis Armstrong. Time feel just gets altered.

    I investigated Hendrix more. All I can say is that it was like getting my first stack of Wes Montgomery records as a kid. GROOVE!

    Hendrix was different than Wes, but he felt like a logical extension, to me.

    SO...how about Charlie, Django, Wes, Hendrix? (and make some room for Steve Cropper and the incredible feeling of the huge dot that he, Booker T, Duck Dunn, and Al Jackson put on the third beat in every measure).

  11. #60

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    My former teacher Larry Coryell had jammed with all these guys, opened for Zep at some show in NY. He was friends with Jimi and had some great stories. I do remember him saying "Eric was very jealous of Jimi"...From interviews I've seen I think the others were in awe of Jimi.

  12. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by jaco
    My former teacher Larry Coryell had jammed with all these guys, opened for Zep at some show in NY. He was friends with Jimi and had some great stories. I do remember him saying "Eric was very jealous of Jimi"...From interviews I've seen I think the others were in awe of Jimi.
    TERRY REID (rock vocalist): We were all hanging out at The Bag O’Nails: Keith, Mick Jagger. Brian [Jones] comes skipping through, like, all happy about something. Paul McCartney walks in. Jeff Beck walks in. Jimmy Page. [Ed’s note: Page denies having been there.] I thought, “What’s this? A bloody convention or something?” Here comes Jim, one of his military jackets, hair all over the place, pulls out this left-handed Stratocaster, beat to hell, looks like he’s been chopping wood with it.
    And he gets up, all soft-spoken. And all of a sudden, “WHOOOR-RRAAAWWRR!” And he breaks into Wild Thing, and it was all over. There were guitar players weeping. They had to mop the floor up. He was piling it on, solo after solo. I could see everyone’s fillings falling out. When he finished, it was silence. Nobody knew what to do. Everybody was dumbstruck, completely in shock.

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    ...Right away, I noticed that the songs by the Beatles had a lot in common with the show tunes that the jazz guitar guys were putting through their paces. Lennon/McCartney songs weren't "Gloria" by The Them, in terms of structure.

    ... The first time I tuned in an FM station, I heard a song "Hey Joe," by Jimi Hendrix. Uh, oh. This was seriously different. The guitar was looser, louder, and way more soulful than anything I had heard to that point...
    One thing that you have to give the Beatles is kudos for variety. Hardly any of their songs sound like each other.

    I always thought that the way Hendrix played "Hey Joe" was all himself until I heard the original Billy Roberts version. All that trickery is in the original. Hendrix heard that and reused it. Not knocking it by any means. In fact, I think that it is pretty cool that he thought so much of the guitar in the original that he would copy it.

  14. #63

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    Billy Roberts on YouTube sounds great. However, I understand that the version we hear there isn't the original version of the song. It's the version Roberts played _after_ he heard Hendrix--he borrows Jimi's arrangement of "Hey Joe" thereafter. Who wouldn't?

    As I understand it, Roberts originally played a version that was closer to folk/bluegrass.

    Still, cool song. I must have performed this one a thousand times.

  15. #64

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    Folk rock singer Tim Rose’s slower version of the song (recorded in 1966 and claimed to be Rose's arrangement of a wholly traditional song)[8] inspired the first single by the Jimi Hendrix Experience.[7] The ex-bassist for the Animals, Chas Chandler, who was now focusing on managing other acts, had also seen Rose performing the song at the Cafe Wha? in New York City and was looking for an artist to record a rock version of "Hey Joe".[39][40]Chandler discovered Jimi Hendrix, who had also been playing at the Cafe Wha? in 1966 and performing an arrangement of "Hey Joe" inspired by Rose's rendition.[40] Chandler decided to take Hendrix with him to England in September 1966, where he would subsequently turn the guitarist into a star.[39] Rose re-recorded "Hey Joe" in the 1990s, re-titling it "Blue Steel .44"[41] and again claimed the song as his own arrangement of a traditional song.

    Not sure what any of this means except that I have not heard any other versions except for the Roberts and Hendrix versions, and perhaps, the Byrds version. I may try to dig for the other versions for the heck of it.

  16. #65

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    Eariler when I said the history of electric guitar can be said in four words -- Charlie Christian, Jimi Hendrix, I was throwng a wink and a nod at Miles Davis who allegedly said the history of jazz can be said in four word -- Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker.

    Then I find this quote from guitarist Mike Stern who played with Miles in the 80s: "Miles loved Hendrix. Jimi and Charlie Christian were his favorite cats as far as guitarists are concerned." Funny, huh?

    Anyway check out this 2001 Jazz Times article called Jimi Hendrix Modern Jazz Axis. Some interesting stuff here.


    Jimi Hendrix: Modern Jazz Axis - JazzTimes

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59
    TERRY REID (rock vocalist): We were all hanging out at The Bag O’Nails: Keith, Mick Jagger. Brian [Jones] comes skipping through, like, all happy about something. Paul McCartney walks in. Jeff Beck walks in. Jimmy Page. [Ed’s note: Page denies having been there.] I thought, “What’s this? A bloody convention or something?” Here comes Jim, one of his military jackets, hair all over the place, pulls out this left-handed Stratocaster, beat to hell, looks like he’s been chopping wood with it.
    And he gets up, all soft-spoken. And all of a sudden, “WHOOOR-RRAAAWWRR!” And he breaks into Wild Thing, and it was all over. There were guitar players weeping. They had to mop the floor up. He was piling it on, solo after solo. I could see everyone’s fillings falling out. When he finished, it was silence. Nobody knew what to do. Everybody was dumbstruck, completely in shock.
    Kevin Ayers, who also was there that night, recalled, "All the stars were there, and I heard serious comments, you know 'shit', 'Jesus', 'damn' and other words worse than that."

  18. #67

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    For a moment I thought they formed a live band with a hologram Hendrix...like Beck, Bogert and Appice. Beck, Clapton, Page and Hendrix (holo).

  19. #68

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    Why is this in the Guitars, Amps, and Gizmo section and not the Players section?

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    Billy Roberts on YouTube sounds great. However, I understand that the version we hear there isn't the original version of the song. It's the version Roberts played _after_ he heard Hendrix--he borrows Jimi's arrangement of "Hey Joe" thereafter. Who wouldn't?

    As I understand it, Roberts originally played a version that was closer to folk/bluegrass.

    Still, cool song. I must have performed this one a thousand times.
    Found a couple of versions by the Leaves and one by Led Zeppelin. I think that this Leaves version might have been pre-Hendrix. Probably the coolest version of the song that I have ever heard. The Led Zeppelin version aptly illustrates the difference between Hendrix and Page. No comparison IMHO. I wouldn't go as far to say that Page is a one trick pony, but his horse is a lot smaller than Jimi's.

    Note the mis-credit for the songwriter on the single label.

    EDIT: I added the Byrds' version which I find somewhat uninteresting. I have never been a huge Byrds fan anyway.







  21. #70

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    Page all the way, because he did more styles and played on good songs...
    I love all of them, but Clapton became boring in the mid 70s, Beck just doesn't have albums I want to hear, and Hendrix is a close second, only second for me because Page had more different things going on... great acoustic folky stuff... amazing recordings all that... where Hendrix was pushing the guitar into new territory, he was too high to play sometimes and didn't have nearly as good of a band

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    Why is this in the Guitars, Amps, and Gizmo section and not the Players section?
    Maybe it should be in Other Styles?

    I personally never really liked these guys that much the first time around. Hendrix deff influenced players that influenced me though. His sound and 'abstract expressionism'.

    My vote goes to Jimi. We covered Third Stone in a band that billed itself as Live Jazz Exorcism. That was exciting!

    I think I'm not qualified to comment on the others.

  23. #72

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    Pointless.

    And as someone here said - what is it doing in this section of the forum anyway?

  24. #73

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    Yea, it's kinda pointless, we can only talk who we prefer, but their place in history is not a question, in that they are equally immortal.

    I can only add this... British rock of that era rules and was more influential and exciting than American. Even Jimi's band was 2/3 English!

  25. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by blackcat
    Pointless.

    And as someone here said - what is it doing in this section of the forum anyway?
    A few people have complained that this thread is in the wrong place. A previous thread in this section morphed into a discussion about Jimmy Page and others. It inspired me to start this thread. Shame on me for not switching to the correct section!


    A frequent poster on this site has this as his signature quote: "Learn to be indifferent to what makes no difference."--Marcus Aurelius. A wise thought!

  26. #75

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    This thread is in the wrong place, and in the wrong forum. I would guess that a lot of the people frequenting said moved on from the world of Marshall stacks and pentatonic wailing some time ago. At least one guy here never even heard (of) them, which is fine. IMO.

  27. #76

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    I think they each did exactly what they most wanted to do with their talents. With the glaring exception being Jimi who just didn't get the chance to find his own true voice.

  28. #77

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    Geez ! I could have sworn I'd joined a jazz guitar forum, not a heavy metal schlock guitar forum !
    Last edited by MarkInLA; 11-03-2018 at 07:27 PM.

  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkInLA
    Geez ! I could have sworn I'd joined a jazz guitar forum, not a heavy metal schlock guitar forum !
    Well, technically those guys are not heavy metal, but they sure imspired those who came after and developed what is now known as heavy metal.

    In that genre they expanded the use of different guitar techniques, such as tremelo picking, whammy bar dives, rh tapping etc. That and the use of high gain amps was the next step from the original blues rock sound.

    Maybe Ritchie Blackmore pushed the guitar more in that direction than your regular HendrixPageBeckClapton.

    So hopefully it helps to eleiminate the confusion, Mark.

    ..and you're welcome!

  30. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkInLA
    Geez ! I could have sworn I'd joined a jazz guitar forum, not a heavy metal schlock guitar forum !

    "heavy metal schlock guitar" Are you serious?

  31. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59
    "heavy metal schlock guitar" Are you serious?
    You must be new, you don't know MarkInLA! It's quite hilarious IMO, take it with good humor.

  32. #81

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    I saw Hendrix at the Electric Factory in Phila. in 1968. It wasn't my 1st concert; I'd seen the Beach Boys play in Asbury Park, NJ (with the Youngbloods opening up) before that, but Hendrix was something else altogether. No one had heard anything like him before - one of a kind - really no comparison at the time... Of course, thru the lens of time, I guess his impact is somewhat diminished, but in his time he was the one.

  33. #82

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    Thread in the wrong place? Well let's not FRET about it...

    Get it? Fret??

    Ahem. Sorry to string you along.

    Will post more about it later, but in the interest of time let me just point out that Jimi played the ENTIRE Sgt Pepper's album the day after it came out, having only heard it once. There are some recordings of his playing the Beatles out there--not sure if it's this exact performance.

    In other words, what an ear the guy had.

    I will say that each of these guys in their prime was awesome for slightly different reasons. And all still worth listening to today.

    BTW another name to add to the list--Carlos Santana. Listening to Santana's first 3 albums the last 2 days...what an incendiary player, and what great tone. I would put a half-dozen Carlos albums up against albums from any of the above guys for guitar wankery.

  34. #83

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    Speaking of wankary...



    And here is Greg Koch’s take on Jimi...


  35. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    Found a couple of versions by the Leaves and one by Led Zeppelin. I think that this Leaves version might have been pre-Hendrix. Probably the coolest version of the song that I have ever heard. The Led Zeppelin version aptly illustrates the difference between Hendrix and Page. No comparison IMHO. I wouldn't go as far to say that Page is a one trick pony, but his horse is a lot smaller than Jimi's.

    Note the mis-credit for the songwriter on the single label.

    EDIT: I added the Byrds' version which I find somewhat uninteresting. I have never been a huge Byrds fan anyway.






    You're right, The Leaves 's one wins for me too! Very British rock sound, I can hear The Who, The Yardbirds influences...

    Led Zep is totally different vibe, close to Hendrix... it's great, but I'm just not very much into hippy jamming anymore, I like tight arrangements and strong rhythm guitar. OTOH I think I prefer Page's licks over Hendrix's.

    The Byrds is pretty lame though, how they even famous?

  36. #85

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    In my mind there have been very few guitarist who have touched and altered as many genre of music as Jimi Hendrix. Yes, he was a rock star -- yet his impact on jazz, soul, R&B, blues, and in some ways indie, folk and reggae music cannot be denied. You can even hear his influence on acoustic artists like Jack Johnson, and while not noticed as much, I believe he even had his own way of expressing country music with his unique feel on songs like the Wind Cries Mary.

    But this is a jazz forum so in the spirit of tagging this thread with a somewhat more jazz connection, here are some excerpts about parallels between Jimi Hendrix and John Coltrane. This is from a commentary in the Free Jazz Collective by a fellow who goes by the handle “stef”.

    ---------

    "It was a coincidence, or maybe not, that in the sixties two musicians transformed their traditional music drastically, turning it inside out and upside down, turning tunes into art.

    "The first was John Coltrane, the second Jimi Hendrix.

    "What they did was comparable: unleash deepfelt emotions, re-inventing what they knew, re-think the scales, deconstruct and recreate, pushing the boundaries. Music before that time did not have the same expressive quality it has now. What we take for granted today, was unheard of before these two geniuses.

    "What has Hendrix got to do with jazz? Well, nothing with jazz per se, but surely with free jazz. He could just let go of rhythm and harmony and just do his thing on stage, exploring the unlimited potential of sound and impact, while always falling back on his feet."

    If you wish, to read the whole commentary, you can find it here: Jimi Hendrix ~ The Free Jazz Collective

  37. #86

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    I have the Gil Evans album where he directs an orchestra to play Hendrix tunes. I agree with the article about it being a poor copy. I kinda have an idea of what Evans was trying to do. I think some of it sounds more like a farce than anything else though.

    This leads to an interesting observation. I don't recall any original Hendrix recordings that had added strings or horns. Groups like the Beatles and the Stones used them. Interesting that Hendrix did not. However, if you listen to the Gil Evans album you might see why.

    Oh, and I know this is a jazz guitar forum. I choose not to complain.

  38. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    Why is this in the Guitars, Amps, and Gizmo section and not the Players section?
    Maybe it's because that's all it deserves ....I mean, where's the music ? Where's the JAZZ ? M.

  39. #88

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    I have the Gil Evans album where he directs an orchestra to play Hendrix tunes. I agree with the article about it being a poor copy. I kinda have an idea of what Evans was trying to do. I think some of it sounds more like a farce than anything else though.

    This leads to an interesting observation. I don't recall any original Hendrix recordings that had added strings or horns. Groups like the Beatles and the Stones used them. Interesting that Hendrix did not. However, if you listen to the Gil Evans album you might see why.

    Oh, and I know this is a jazz guitar forum. I choose not to complain.
    When Jimi died, he had a number of projects in the works. One, in a jazz direction, was to do an album with Gil Evans. While that never happened, Gil, later on, chose to do an album of Hendrix tunes as a tribute. The album falls short to be sure, but I think had the chance for the two of them to collaborate have happened, the result would have been special.

  40. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkInLA
    Maybe it's because that's all it deserves ....I mean, where's the music ? Where's the JAZZ ? M.
    If you cannot hear the jazz chords Jimi used all over the Axis album, you may be beyond help as a jazz musician.

  41. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    When Jimi died, he had a number of projects in the works. One, in a jazz direction, was to do an album with Gil Evans. While that never happened, Gil, later on, chose to do an album of Hendrix tunes as a tribute. The album falls short to be sure, but I think had the chance for the two of them to collaborate have happened, the result would have been special.
    I was aware of that, but from the sounds of the Evans album, I don't think that the two of them talked about it much. My opinion. That said, I kinda doubt that Hendrix would have wanted to do a record with Evans of songs that Hendrix had already previously recorded, so, yeah, it could have been great with new material.

  42. #91

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    Here's a story for you. Larry Coryell was playing at the Gas Light on Macdougal Street in Greenwich Village. Across the street was a smaller venue, Cafe Wha? Coryell was a fairly established guy, at that point (1966), who was third-streaming jazz and rock. He was one of the early guitarists doing the "fusion" thing.

    Anyway, between sets he got up and crossed the street to see who was playing at the "Wha?" (Some folks make out Cafe Wha? to be a small dive, but though it was small it was where Dylan got his start in NYC.) Coryell walked in and was blown away. He sat down and listened to Jimmy James and the Blue Flames. Coryell's later description was that he thought his career was over, that he should just lose his guitar. He thought Hendrix was miles ahead on the fusion of rock and jazz. According to Coryell, he went out that evening and used heroin for the first time--he became a pretty bad addict for a time.

    Now I don't know...I'm not as competent to judge fusion as Larry Coryell was. If Larry Coryell thought Hendrix was the guy, I am willing to bet that he was. Miles, too, thought this to be the case. Davis wanted Hendrix-like guitarists in his organization for many years after hearing him. (Landing Johnny Mac, though, wasn't a bad "get.")

    And _that's_ why at least Jimi belongs in this thread. Now, one could argue that the thread could be relocated under players, but...

    Oh...and Steve Cropper!

  43. #92

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    Well got a break in the work action for awhile...

    I don't agree with people who complain so and so isn't like he was in his prime. Who IS?? That's why it's called the PRIME. The smart ones like Clapton and Beck and Knopfler and so on find a way to keep going even after the "Clapton is GOD" thing has run its course.

    The less fortunate ones burn out AND fade away, or die of self-neglect at age 40. Or hang themselves in their garage.

    Very, very few people continue that incendiary talent into their middle years and beyond. Wayne Shorter comes to mind right now. Chick Corea. Jeff Beck if pure chops are the criterion. But most artists mellow with age. And the phrase "lightning in a bottle"--hard to capture that a second time.

    Clapton--electrified the blues for a mass audience in a way that hadn't been done before. His best work was 40 years ago, but he has produced many, many good albums since then, even his most recent. His albums with Steve Winwood and the reunited Cream showed his chops were still there. (I saw him with Winwood about 5 years ago--great show.) And as a singer he remains one of the best of his time. He has certainly blended more different styles of music than the other guys, veering into country, tin-pan alley, boogie, old-time acoustic blues, etc.

    Beck--the most technically brilliant who has continued to expand his vocabulary even to this day. Never quite as famous as the others. I agree the old JBG and Wired-era stuff was the best. His recent albums are pretty good, and the Guitar Party album was great. I don't find his more metal-oriented stuff as compelling as the others, but it's not for lack of talent. He looks about as old as he did back in the 60's, which is some kind of statement I guess.

    Page--equal to Jimi in my book for pure enjoyment of tone and riffs. THE riff king--often imitated, never exceeded. A great talent for production and overall SOUND of the group. His playing live was kind of sloppy, but that's not a problem in my book. Listen to How the West Was Won for Page in his prime. He and Plant are both very intellectual dudes, as you can tell from their interviews. His post-Zepp output has not been that prodigious or impressive, with a few exceptions, which is kind of surprising. Kind of coasted on his laurels I guess. He doesn't seem unhappy when I see him on TV.

    Jimi--well, what else can be said? There was before Jimi and there was after. Jimi brought the sexuality to the guitar. Sure T-Bone did it first, but maybe a couple thousand people saw and heard him play, whereas Jimi showed millions how playing the guitar was like having sex. Back in the day I thought Robin Trower did a pretty good Jimi act, but no one really plays like him. SRV and others have taken inspiration from him, but they don't play like him. With Jimi you got the idea there were no limits to what a guitar could sound like on a record or in real life. For the time when he came along he was like a match to gasoline, giving so many people the freedom to play guitar, make noise, just to be free spirits. Are You Experienced? That was the question of the 60's and beyond.

  44. #93

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    Hendrix was a force of nature who influenced lots of people outside of rock blues, in ways that we're maybe still not aware of. That said, if you hear "jazz chords all over Axis", I wanna know where you got that acid

  45. #94

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    I have played Axis chords all over jazz for decades, not the other way around. I work Hendrix into jazz stuff all the time. Jazz can be pretty receptive to the R&B/blues/rock stuff that Jimi did.

    About the only chord that Jimi routinely employed that you see in a jazz chart, I guess, would be the augmented 9th.

  46. #95

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    It's Jimi for me. His influence and talent is still with us.
    I have two friends who are musicians and have young families. One named his first born son "Jimi" and the second friend named his first born son "Hendrix". This says it all.

  47. #96

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    By the way- that 7th chord with a sharp 9 is still called "the Jimi Hendrix chord"

  48. #97

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    Quiz time: What did Downbeat Magazine readers think of rock guitarist Hendrix during his lifetime? Well these dyed-in-the-wool jazz fans picked Hendrix as the winner of the 1970 Downbeat Hall of Fame Readers poll -- right between Ornette Coleman (1969) and Charles Mingus (1971). 1970 was also the year Miles’ Bitches Brew was picked as record of the year. Lots of musical changes going on then and maybe these listeners understood a thing or two...

  49. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by archtopeddy
    In my mind there have been very few guitarist who have touched and altered as many genre of music as Jimi Hendrix. Yes, he was a rock star -- yet his impact on jazz, soul, R&B, blues, and in some ways indie, folk and reggae music cannot be denied. You can even hear his influence on acoustic artists like Jack Johnson, and while not noticed as much, I believe he even had his own way of expressing country music with his unique feel on songs like the Wind Cries Mary...

    "The first was John Coltrane, the second Jimi Hendrix

    "What has Hendrix got to do with jazz? Well, nothing with jazz per se, but surely with free jazz. He could just let go of rhythm and harmony and just do his thing on stage, exploring the unlimited potential of sound and impact, while always falling back on his feet."

    If you wish, to read the whole commentary, you can find it here: Jimi Hendrix ~ The Free Jazz Collective
    Really true ...

    I have to admit I especially love these two no matter what I have been listening to or playing.
    Any time either I or some one else plays anything by either of them - my ears light up and I remember how important their music has been for my whole life. No other artists work on me that way... i love music - listen all time to a big range new and old but nothing ever touches as deep.
    Love this

    hendrix jazz chord... 066470. Move it around it will surprise you

  50. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by Timo
    By the way- that 7th chord with a sharp 9 is still called "the Jimi Hendrix chord"
    It's known by that name to rock musicians. See Debussy and probably before him.

  51. #100

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    These who's greater than whom threads always make me sleepy...