1. #1

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    I thought I'd share something that I believe all jazz guitarists around the world should be doing and that is learning to accompany themselves sing. I'll be first to admit my singing sounds like Sylvester Stallone sings the Standards but that doesn't stop me from having this be part of my practice regiment. Learning the lyrics expands your understanding of the song. In one action you canimprove your understanding of
    1. the melody
    2. harmony and chord voicings
    3. lyrics
    4. ways of accompaniment
    5 .styles of accompaniment across genres
    6. interpretation of the lyrics
    7. time feel
    8. How the lyrics and story of the song inform what you play and how you play it!

    Here's a YouTube tutorial on my channel pertaining to this topic!



    For the lucky souls who are born with a great voice, learning to do this will make you more hirable as a frontman and sideman!

    Learn to accompany yourselves singing!!!

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjang1993
    I thought I'd share something that I believe all jazz guitarists around the world should be doing and that is learning to accompany themselves sing. I'll be first to admit my singing sounds like Sylvester Stallone sings the Standards but that doesn't stop me from having this be part of my practice regiment. Learning the lyrics expands your understanding of the song. In one action you canimprove your understanding of
    1. the melody
    2. harmony and chord voicings
    3. lyrics
    4. ways of accompaniment
    5 .styles of accompaniment across genres
    6. interpretation of the lyrics
    7. time feel
    8. How the lyrics and story of the song inform what you play and how you play it!

    Here's a YouTube tutorial on my channel pertaining to this topic!



    For the lucky souls who are born with a great voice, learning to do this will make you more hirable as a frontman and sideman!

    Learn to accompany yourselves singing!!!
    I agree. My wife tells me that my voice is reminiscent of Kermit the Frog, but that doesn’t stop me from trying


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #3
    Can't recommend this enough. Getting to know a tune? Play the roots, sing the melody. Play the melody, sing the roots.
    No peeking at the chart.

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by jjang1993
    I thought I'd share something that I believe all jazz guitarists around the world should be doing and that is learning to accompany themselves sing. I'll be first to admit my singing sounds like Sylvester Stallone sings the Standards but that doesn't stop me from having this be part of my practice regiment. Learning the lyrics expands your understanding of the song. In one action you canimprove your understanding of
    1. the melody
    2. harmony and chord voicings
    3. lyrics
    4. ways of accompaniment
    5 .styles of accompaniment across genres
    6. interpretation of the lyrics
    7. time feel
    8. How the lyrics and story of the song inform what you play and how you play it!

    Here's a YouTube tutorial on my channel pertaining to this topic!



    For the lucky souls who are born with a great voice, learning to do this will make you more hirable as a frontman and sideman!

    Learn to accompany yourselves singing!!!
    That video is not public access at this time.

  6. #5

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    Accompanying a singer is a true art for a solo guitarist or pianist, and I love to hear it as much as to do it. But I don’t think I’ve ever played as well while singing as I do behind someone else at the mic. I’ve always found it difficult to pay full attention to the subtleties of timing, filling, dynamic shading etc when accompanying myself.

    I’ve had a lot of opportunity to polish this skill over many years. Keeping a great singer with a local or regional band has been a real chore because they all aspire to better gigs, more money, and star billing. And when each one inevitably moves on, I end up back at the mic until we find the next one. I’ve been lucky enough to be playing with some of the same people for over 40 years - and none can or is willing to even try singing except our drummer (who sings a few blues tunes). And it’s as difficult for me with a rhythm section as it is alone. I don’t articulate the vocal notes & lines as effectively as I should unless I keep the comping simple and avoid any syncopated or offbeat content. And maintaining a walking bass line more inventive than 1-5-1-5 behind myself while chording is just not going to happen.

    So I certainly encourage learning to accompany yourself. But I think it’s at least as beneficial and possibly more productive for many like me to listen to and practice with recordings of others. When I was a kid, I bought Perry Como records to hear and learn how Tony Mottola backed him, after hearing them together on the PC TV show segment “Sing to Me, Mister C”. I watched Lawrence Welk to hear Neil Levang back the singers. I bought Nancy Wilson albums with Jack Wilson and Sarah Vaughan records with Mundell Lowe. My friends thought I was nuts to spend money on pop pap like Perry Como, but it was a lifetime investment for me.

  7. #6

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    Nope. Not gonna sing.

  8. #7

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    And just last night the wife said remember the time that you tried to sing? Finding it very funny.

    Little does she know what I do in the music room

  9. #8

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    Good exercise in rhythmic independence. Singing and comping bossa is like, the ultimate challenge for me haha

  10. #9

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    Singing can be learned, a few lessons with a good vocal coach will strengthen the voice and the breathing, and finding your strongest range and then putting the songs in keys that fit that range will also help. When you investigate it, it turns out that many successful singers do not have great voices, just the ability to use their instrument well. Dylan, Waits, Knopfler, Billy Holiday, Louis Armstrong, Joao Gilberto all got by on expression, time feel, and innate musicality while having voices that were less than ideal; even Sinatra's voice was not a particularly great instrument. The idea that one should be able to play as freely while accompanying oneself as when accompanying others is all about practice; just listen to Nat Cole's early trio stuff, or watch some of the videos on youtube, he's like 2 people, it's amazing, and possible. Same with Gilberto singing and playing Bossa-nova guitar: he spent virtually all of his time singing and playing. As an aside: Como was a great singer; nothing seemed difficult for him, even though the material was often 2nd-rate, he had a serious purity and control.

    I spent 40 years playing the guitar and only singing occasional harmonies, until I discovered the senior market, and realized those folks want to hear the lyrics to their favorites, so I took some vocal lessons and started singing the standards and pop confections of the mid-20th century; turned out to be great fun and feels really good. I'll never be a great voice, but I work with Mike Renzi quite often, who played for Torme for 20 years, and did the Lady Gaga tour with Tony Bennett, and he thinks I do OK, so you never know.