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  1. #1

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    Because we've gotten so far away

    And just because...


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    ^ the great son house!!...his orig death letter blues is one of my fave blues ever!!

    equally great but different- mississippi john hurt..."ny's a good town, but it's not for mine!!" avalon blues

    cut in 1928!



    cheers

  4. #3

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    the great lightnin hopkins...pure texas bluesman

    baby please dont go



    check his right hand!!! he's all over for the dynamics!!! master

    cheers

  5. #4

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    early "vid" style by the great jb lenoir

    w gagliano branded hofner made arch..with added dearmond pup



    cheers

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    ^ the great son house!!...his orig death letter blues is one of my fave blues ever!!

    equally great but different- mississippi john hurt..."ny's a good town, but it's not for mine!!" avalon blues

    cut in 1928!



    cheers
    I had a record with Candy Man as a teen. How I loved it!

  7. #6
    Other faves, records I owned starting from teen years:

    Sonny Terry-Brownie McGhee:
    (Hometown Blues---I think? On either Everest or Folkways. It had Meet You in the Morning---'if the boat don't sink and the train don't turn around...'
    B.B. King: Live at the Regal
    Blues Jam in Chicago
    Fathers and Sons
    Memphis Slim:
    Blue Memphis
    John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers: A Hard Road; Looking Back; John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers (Clapton w/Beano comic book); Blues From Laurel Canyon
    The Story of the Blues
    The Best of Little Walter
    (was said to be rare in the earliest '70s---had Juke, which we went nuts over)
    For openers, til I think of more...

  8. #7

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    the great backstory to avalon blues is they brought him up from avalon mississippi..(his hometown) to record in nyc...avalon blues is his story...couldnt wait to get back home...and actually dissappeared from recording for around 3 decades after that!!

    thankfully he was almost as spry and great when they(dick waterman) dug him out for the 60's folk-blues revival...and he got to record again..and influence young players...bonnie raitt sat at his feet!

    cheers

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    early "vid" style by the great jb lenoir

    w gagliano branded hofner made arch..with added dearmond pup



    cheers
    Dayam!

    Is that raw or what?!

  10. #9

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    my fave uk...peter green

    the supernatural...cut with mcvie and fleetwood pre fleetwood mac..on mayall lp



    tremendous reverb was added from board by producer mike vernon

    cheers

  11. #10
    Can't leave him out, no way

    With a waltz!


  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    my fave uk...peter green

    the supernatural...cut with mcvie and fleetwood pre fleetwood mac..on mayall lp



    tremendous reverb was added from board by producer mike vernon

    cheers
    Greenie was the best of the white boys! Even BB said he gave him chills. He still does that to me!

  13. #12
    Long as we're bringing up Greenie---here's Father:


  14. #13
    Imagine being a Jewish teen in Canarsie discovering gonads and girls---and hearing this:


  15. #14
    'Little village, motherf&&r, LITTLE VILLAGE!!

    My friend Gary and I, 14 years old---rolling on the floor hearing this exchange with (Leonard?) Chess:


  16. #15

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    the other great that bb dug...the great gary moore..who had peter greens lp...notice he has reversed neck pup like greenie did!!!

    bb's hammin, but u can see he's blown away...moore was a true great...he was part of bruce, baker and moore..fillin ec's shoes...he played fusiony stuff too..with colosseum and some of his own stuff...and he did metal too..brilliant player..but always blues based

    rip gary moore

    check bb reactions out on this-from abt 4 minutes on



    cheers

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Imagine being a Jewish teen in Canarsie discovering gonads and girls---and hearing this:
    and this

    kalb!



    cheers

  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    and this

    kalb!



    cheers
    OMG!

    Don't get me started!

  19. #18
    True confession: after a 'bowl' or 2 I used to 'act out' Flute Thing---dancing around the room. I was 14. When I learned a little bit, sorry, but to me it was pretentious pseudo-jazz drivel. Still is, but at 14 what do you really know? They were heroes then. Maybe if I listened again...

    Part of the later (and very recent) resentment is from having read Al Kooper's Backstage Passes and Backstabbing Bastards autobiog. He was so unlikable---cavernous ego, a woman abuser, a self-admitted big hustler with minimal talent. I suppose it made me want to like his music less. I know he scored a lot of wins in the biz. Deserves props for that.

    The Blues Project was part of my youth, for sure. But unlike most real deal blues I prefer to leave them there...

  20. #19

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    Some of my favorite blues recordings. (There are many, many others. These have run through my head today.)








  21. #20

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    I can't stop...






  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    the other great that bb dug...the great gary moore..who had peter greens lp cheers
    I can't get past the story---I only wish it weren't true---that he took advantage of Green's mental illness and childlike innocent honesty and bought that guitar from him for like $250 USD---then flipped it for like $10,000. Doesn't sit well with me. Maybe he is a great player. Honestly never heard him. I'll listen...

  23. #22

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    This is hip!




  24. #23

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    hard to evaluate the person separately from his creative endeavors (woody!).. al kooper.....he was set to play guitar on like a rollin stone..dylan session...in walks mike bloomfield...plugs in and plays a bit..kooper was like- let me outta here!!! i can't even touch the guitar after that...so he sat behind organ..and played away at that..the rest is history!! his career pretty much built off that

    I'm not so harsh on koop

    and of course blues project was psuedo psuedo...but good reference nevertheless!! haha



    cheers

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    I can't get past the story---I only wish it weren't true---that he took advantage of Green's mental illness and childlike innocent honesty and bought that guitar from him for like $250 USD---then flipped it for like $10,000. Doesn't sit well with me. Maybe he is a great player. Honestly never heard him. I'll listen...

    no no dont diminish it..he loved peter green..and gave him a fair price at the time..he kept it precious for years...honored it..and when it sold it had huge historic value..dont blame the player..be like if you had george bensons 60's guild...& u bought in 70 for 300$...

    skip that line of thought

    and dig bbs reaction to his playing...

    cheers

  26. #25

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    Albert King "Years gone by." Absolute real deal.
    Albert + Booker T and the MGs
    Booker, Steve Cropper, Duck Dunn, and Al Jackson jr

  27. #26

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    I don't understand this thread. Maybe Joel's gone coo-coo! This is the Lessons folder, isn't it?

    Blues-blues isn't jazz-blues. Shouldn't it be under 'Other Styles' or something? Not that I care, I'm just wondering.

    Because we've gotten so far away
    But that's not true at all. There's plenty of blues players playing blues-blues today and plenty of jazz players playing jazz-blues. Nothing's changed at all.


  28. #27

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    Actually, I think the idea of the blues as the expression of black suffering is outdated. I think it's become a cliche. In today's world I'm not sure it's very relevant any more.

    This is not to say it should be forgotten, any more than the Holocaust should be forgotten, but we can't live in the past. The blues is perhaps a generic way of expressing human despair because of its structure and nature but, in the end, it's only a feeling, the expression of a feeling. And it makes good music.

    Jazz has incorporated the blues sound into its genre, and makes the music more interesting, but 'Blues For Alice' hasn't really much relationship to what Bukka White was doing in the video. There's musically a historical relationship but that's all.

    So I don't think we've 'gotten far away', it's that we've moved on - as we should have done. It's not being disrespectful of the past, it's just that life is about movement, change and progression.

  29. #28

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    makes me want to get a dobro. Lonnie Johnson always one of my favourites - out and out blues player but with Ellington, Louis. And Eddie Lang, the classical and ragtime influence.... there’s jazz right there.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Greenie was the best of the white boys! Even BB said he gave him chills. He still does that to me!
    He was my favourite of the brits for sure. Eric who?

  31. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    I don't understand this thread. Maybe Joel's gone coo-coo!
    Maybe?

    You're late, dude. I 'went coo coo' in 1954---the year I was, er, released from inside Bess Fass...

  32. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    So I don't think we've 'gotten far away', it's that we've moved on - as we should have done. It's not being disrespectful of the past, it's just that life is about movement, change and progression.
    Bill Evans; Chick Corea; Pat Metheny---etc., etc. Did they 'move on'; 'get far away'---or have the courage to be themselves and play what was in their own souls and cultures? I respect them for the latter---very much---and also wish sometimes they'd have further investigated the middle option.

    Yes, jazz has gotten away from its heartbeat and roots. Yes, an art evolves and moves on. (The change was mostly in harmonic affectation and to more 'harmony-first, and the 'straighter' orientation of the 8th note---in 'mainstream' jazz). No, I'm not one of those 'retro' people (ick!). But I want to hear the roots in there somewhere. Shoot me...

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    And Eddie Lang, the classical and ragtime influence.... there’s jazz right there.
    and blues !

    Ragtime Crazy - WILLIAM MOORE. Ragtime Blues Guitar 1928

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Lonnie Johnson always one of my favourites .
    Me too, definitely.

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    I want to hear the roots in there somewhere. Shoot me...
    Well, you hear the roots every time you hear a blue note. One b3 over a dominant and bob's your uncle :-)

  36. #35
    If even one of us learns something from this, yeah, it belongs in the 'lessons folder'...

  37. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    One b3 over a dominant and bob's your uncle :-)
    Bob?

    'What about Bob?'--Julie Haggerty...

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    Well, you hear the roots every time you hear a blue note...
    it is precisely a reduction of the blues to a musical dimension, and even more a Western vision of the blue note on the third, between major and minor, as it always presents itself in African music, the "so called" african pentatonic mode, which are far from the degrees of temperate music (listen for example to xylophones). Even the great musicologist and composior André Hodeir (Ana Livia Plurabelle, Bitter Ending, from James Joyce), admirer of Duke Ellington and Charlie Parker, and great connoisseur of contemporary composition Art music, is sning himself on this subject (book Hommes et problèmes du Jazz, 1954)

    from this point of view, I rather agree with Joelf

    moreover, "Roots" has a relatively precise meaning about the history of the American Black People

  39. #38

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    You know, anyone would think the coloured people were the only ones who had suffered. Everyone's suffered, right? What about the Red Indians? The Aborigines, the Africans, the Chinese, the Jews, the Christians, all those in the Middle East living with wars, sanctions... everybody, including you and me.

    But the black guys produced this extraordinary musical genre that's lasted and pervaded so much. That's a little wonder in itself.

  40. #39

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    I like Skip James, he had quite an eerie-sounding voice and he used a D minor open tuning on the guitar.


  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Bob?

    'What about Bob?'--Julie Haggerty...
    Bob's your uncle - Wikipedia

  42. #41

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    A photo I took in 1982 of Muddy Waters and Chuck Berry - rock’n’roll meets the blues!

    They were both appearing (but not together) at the same festival. Chuck suddenly ran on stage at the end of Muddy’s set and hugged him - luckily I had my camera ready, they were only together for a few seconds.

    Blues Thread-ce175ea7-2308-4a60-90ee-f9fc26e97a5c-jpg

  43. #42

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    Muddy with Tele:

    Blues Thread-44f92f9d-08bd-4798-ac33-12ac7711c5b6-jpg

  44. #43

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    Couple of early favourites, Sonny Boy Williamson's King Biscuit Time recordings - the first (& only) record I ever learned to play along with all the way through, & Tommy McLennan Bluebird Records Volume ?...

    I taped the Sonny Boy & never returned the McLennan to the library....


    Seeing Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee was a life changer too. Although the sound man told me they'd both asked not to hear the other in their monitor...(I was trying to wangle a recording)

  45. #44

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    I got into blues soon after getting into rock guitar, probably after hearing Hendrix’s ‘Red House’. Then a friend played me Muddy Waters ‘Hard Again’ with Johnny Winters, I was knocked out by it. So we tried to play the blues, but we knew we were just middle-class white boys who couldn’t pull it off, we weren’t stupid. But I took the trouble to read books about the whole history of it, and collected quite a few blues records.

    I once knew a guy who thought the blues started and ended with Clapton, he didn’t care at all for any of the black bluesmen. I thought that was stupid, but he probably wasn’t the only one, sadly.

    When I got into jazz I could hear how some players had a feel for the blues, e.g. Bird playing ‘Parker’s Mood’.

    I think it’s beneficial to at least try and absorb some of the emotion and background of the blues, it can only help your jazz playing surely. I do find some jazz a bit too ‘mathematical’ these days.

    Anyway here’s the track by Muddy that blew me away:


  46. #45

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    Here's a guy who is clearly influenced by pre-war blues guitar - mixing sophisticated lines with downhome blues licks:



  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Bill Evans; Chick Corea; Pat Metheny---etc., etc. Did they 'move on'; 'get far away'---or have the courage to be themselves and play what was in their own souls and cultures? I respect them for the latter---very much---and also wish sometimes they'd have further investigated the middle option.

    Yes, jazz has gotten away from its heartbeat and roots. Yes, an art evolves and moves on. (The change was mostly in harmonic affectation and to more 'harmony-first, and the 'straighter' orientation of the 8th note---in 'mainstream' jazz). No, I'm not one of those 'retro' people (ick!). But I want to hear the roots in there somewhere. Shoot me...
    My theory? Jazz education concentrates on the individual and the measurable. 'Play this scale' 'play groupings of five' and so on...

    Groove is social and you can't measure the blues. So there you go.

  48. #47

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    Duke Robillard recently made an album of acoustic blues songs he loved and learned in his youth. This is one of my favorties, a song from the '20s that is rather more sophisticated than a lot of later blues.


  49. #48

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    Buddy Guy and Stevie Ray Vaughan at Buddy's club in Chicago, 1989. A 30-minute jam on "Champagne and Reefer"


  50. #49

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    Very important blues guitar player. His rhythm was strong and catchy.


  51. #50

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    One of my favorite records. Guitar Slim doesn't even take a solo on this and it's still great. (I'm not sure he plays at all on this recording.)



    But he could play, of course. And with distinction.