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  1. #151

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    JAMES COTTON, CHARLIE HADEN, JOE LOUIS WALKER
    Joe Louis Walker is the real deal. I caught JLW a couple of times back in the '90s and after meeting him at a gig, we spent a long evening singing Son House songs together as he regaled me with first-hand stories of Muddy Waters, Earl Hooker, Fred McDowell and Magic Sam. Joe invited me to join him onstage at his CD launch the following day. A friend took a photo of the event but bizarrely, it was accidentally developed along with someone else's roll of film (I never found out who that woman was!):

    Blues Thread-pmb-jlw-jpg

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #152

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    Quote Originally Posted by PMB
    Agreed. I often teach that tune as a prime example of electric Chicago blues in the key of E. Here's my transcription of the intro and solo:

    Attachment 69418Attachment 69419
    Neat! I'll print this and go over it next time I practice. That's a fun song.

  4. #153

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    [QUOTE=MarkRhodes;1011072]A few blues (and bluesy) things by the Rolling Stones.

    /QUOTE]

    now ry cooder is the man behind the stones use of g tuning..particularly keith who morphed it into his iconic 5 string tele...cooders on their jamming with edward sessions...and brought in his knowledge of slide and tunings...tho brian jones had been pretty good with elmore james type stuff in their early days

    also, nice hearing the earl coleman ^..a fave singer...love his sides with bird

    dark shadows-




    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 02-23-2020 at 11:34 PM. Reason: sp-

  5. #154

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Wow! Thanks---never knew this existed. What record is it from?

    Can't say for sure, I found this cut on a compilation and just ended up looking for it on YouTube later on. I think it was later released under miles though.

  6. #155

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic

    also, nice hearing the earl coleman ^..a fave singer...love his sides with bird

    dark shadows-




    cheers
    That's a great one, cool hearing him with Bird.

  7. #156
    How about some lesser-name but fine artists?

    I grew up with harmonica player Corrin Huddleston. We were young blues freaks living and hangin' in the People's Republic of Brooklyn---late '60s-early '70s. He was a guy everyone looked up to then for his playing and singing.

    He went on to become a busy pro, playing the full run of several Broadway shows and working as a rep for Hohner, traveling the country demonstrating their products. He showed me some harmonicas I never knew existed, like a huge bass one.

    But the core of his playing has always been blues, and I'll let his playing speak for itself with a recent performance (he also has a youtube channel, if you like what you hear):



    The youtube channel where he's featured way more:

    Corrin Huddleston
    - YouTube

  8. #157
    This one is really good---singing and playing. Good group, too:


  9. #158

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    Eddie Boyd and Peter Green. Enjoy.

  10. #159

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    My Favourite Song on the Album "7936 South Rhodes"



  11. #160

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    Jimmie Vaughan & Duke Robillard, from a flexi-disc that came with an issue of "Guitar Player."


  12. #161

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  13. #162

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Jimmie Vaughan & Duke Robillard, from a flexi-disc that came with an issue of "Guitar Player."

    Remember that one well and I'm sure I still have it somewhere...

  14. #163

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    On the jumpy side of the street...


  15. #164

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    On the jumpy side of the street...

    That's a very fine album!

  16. #165

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    The original version of Folsom Prison Blues Cash cribbed from Gordon Jenkins’ “Crescent City Blues,” which includes the opening line “I hear the train a’comin’; it’s rollin’ ’round the bend.” Cash forked over a reported $100,000 after Jenkins sued him for copyright infringement.....if I shoot a man in Reno, NEVADA, what am I doing banged up in a CALIFORNIA State Pen?not only settled out of court for 75 grand, but that Gordon Jenkins would receive all future royalties for the song, PROVIDED he did not go to the media about it. That was the deal. This would have been a big blot on Cashs career, at a point where he had a hit TV show and was about to come out with a book about how Jesus had "Saved" him. Maybe it wouldn't have been a big deal if Folsom Prison wasn't his THEME song that opened all of his shows
    Last edited by voxsss; 02-28-2020 at 08:38 AM.

  17. #166

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    Why do people do that? Stealing someone's music is a really low thing to do.

  18. #167

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    Drive my Blues away...


  19. #168
    It would be in very bad taste to put my own track up here, so I won't---but say that I arranged Folsom as a slow blues---and it works! Great song, 'liberated' or not, and terrific source material.

    To Zina: 'Musicians are all the biggest thieves'---John Birks Gillespie

    It's when you do it on the sneak and don't credit (or, worse, don't pay) that you're crossing the line and asking for trouble.

    But, hey, what would the blues be without trouble?

  20. #169

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    An old oracle once told:

    If you only got 3 chords, you sometimes try to "steal" a fourth one.
    You carry it carefully under your belt,
    run home, bang it on the table
    and find out that it's just another G7


  21. #170

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    Before horns were added to the final mix, "Albert's Shuffle".


  22. #171

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    Hi Mark, your video-choice takes me way way way back...

    Maybe we should forget all that "jazz-stuff" and kick off a Bloomfield/Winter Revival Band
    . Have fun.


  23. #172

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    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe
    Hi Mark, your video-choice takes me way way way back...

    Maybe we should forget all that "jazz-stuff" and kick off a Bloomfield/Winter Revival Band
    . Have fun.
    Always loved Johnny Winter. He could really tear it up.

    This cut is from one of his last records ("Roots") and the video contains many pictures of Johnny (and brother Edgar) as a kid.


  24. #173

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    sad sad sad,...but we all have to go. R.I.P., Johnny Guitar


  25. #174
    Ed Cherry posted this on FB today, and I pass it on:


  26. #175

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    Mance Lipscomb, the first Bluesman I ever heard. Since then I'm hooked...
    Through Jazz,Gypsy Jazz,Swing,Country,Bluegrass, you name it...I never escaped the Blues and it's good
    that way.


  27. #176
    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe
    Mance Lipscomb, the first Bluesman I ever heard. Since then I'm hooked...
    Through Jazz,Gypsy Jazz,Swing,Country,Bluegrass, you name it...I never escaped the Blues and it's good
    that way.

    This belongs on the 'jazzin' up old blues' thread, but here too. Never did know who did the original (the Evans LP notes say it's 'traditional'). Thanks for posting this...


  28. #177

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  29. #178

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    "You've been meetin' your man babe, down at the local laundromat..."
    What a great song. Thanks for posting Albert King, Gitfiddler


  30. #179

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    Last edited by Nick71; 03-06-2020 at 01:44 PM.

  31. #180

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    R.L.'s got it goin' on!

  32. #181

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    be remiss not to mention the great early bluesman-blind lemon jefferson-...one of the earliest and most popular recorded bluesmen of his time..and huge influence...especially the texans...lightnin hopkins was all about jefferson...johnny winter too

    horrifying to think, a blind man, he died frozen & alone on the streets of chicago

    easy rider blues



    cheers

  33. #182

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    be remiss not to mention the great early bluesman-blind lemon jefferson-...one of the earliest and most popular recorded bluesmen of his time..and huge influence...especially the texans...lightnin hopkins was all about jefferson...johnny winter too

    horrifying to think, a blind man, he died frozen & alone on the streets of chicago


    cheers
    Yes, very sad. Blind Willie McTell was last seen on a parking lot playing for dimes,
    then disappeared. Tampa Red ended in a kind of asylum. He couldn't remember anything anymore
    in the end etc. etc....cruel.
    But...we are still talking about Blind Lemon. We are still enjoying his great music. In a way he'll never die.
    Here's another gem :


  34. #183

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    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe
    Here's another gem :

    have had that cd ^ for decades...a great compilation...georgia string bands (1928-1930)... a great listen


    cheers

  35. #184

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    Little Charlie (Baty) died the other day.
    Here's a set with him & the Nightcats from back in the VHS days.
    Charlie could play and the band cooked.
    RIP, Charlie. (There's an RIP thread in the Players section. I'll post this vid there too. Good stuff.)


  36. #185

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    Seems, they all leaving us...ok ok, not all.
    A few are still here:



    Thanks for posting, Mark.

  37. #186

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Tab Benoit, a Tele man from Lousiana. Used to see him at the old Rock'n'Bowl in NOLA. Good times.
    How did I miss this thread?!?!?!? GGGAAAHHHHHH!!!!!!!!


    OK, so... I love Tab. I think he's one of the only "authentic" blues guys out there today (no offense to Bonamassa and KWS, but...) People always reference this clip. It's actually not one of my favorites... but I do think he's got the soul of an old blues player, which JB and KWS do not. He records LIVE, including the vocals. He's a big believer in capturing the MOMENT, mistakes and all... old-school. If you haven't seen him live, I highly recommend it.



    And, he can boogie too...


  38. #187

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    All my favorites have already been posted... but I will post another Albert Collins, as there isn't enough of him in here...




    And one who has not yet been mentioned....



  39. #188

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    Albert Collins went his own way---open F minor tuning and using only his fingers to pick some of the most biting blues lines anyone ever heard.

    This song, "Snowed In" is my favorite example of how Albert used his guitar for sound effects in telling stories. If you've never heard this, it's worth checking out. And when he gets that frosty car cranked, look out!


  40. #189

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Albert Collins went his own way---open F minor tuning and using only his fingers to pick some of the most biting blues lines anyone ever heard.

    This song, "Snowed In" is my favorite example of how Albert used his guitar for sound effects in telling stories. If you've never heard this, it's worth checking out. And when he gets that frosty car cranked, look out!

    I always default to BB when someone asks me who my "favorite" is, because w/o BB.... BUT- I gotta' say, Collins is not only right up there, neck-and-neck, but may be pulling ahead.... for me.

    Probably a big reason I like Benoit and early Jonny Lang so much... both are Collins disciples. Altho Lang left the blues a long time ago...

    Benoit is also a big "effects" guy (with the guitar; no pedals).... check out "Dirty Dishes" and "We Make A Good Gumbo"

    FFWD to 3:00


  41. #190

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    Here's the great Otis Rush:


  42. #191

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    ...it's a Blues


  43. #192

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    got to this one via the late great west coast bluesman -mike wilhelm

    larry johnson- unheralded modern blues master--rip-keep it clean



    cheers

  44. #193

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    J Geils Band first album, doing a killer John Lee Hooker cover.


  45. #194

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    "Charley Stone" 's my favourite Larry Johnson Song. Enjoy.



  46. #195

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    The Blues has many faces.


  47. #196
    Be Bu (minor blues): 48:10


  48. #197

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    OK, so... I love Tab. I think he's one of the only "authentic" blues guys out there today (no offense to Bonamassa and KWS, but...) People always reference this clip. It's actually not one of my favorites... but I do think he's got the soul of an old blues player, which JB and KWS do not. He records LIVE, including the vocals. He's a big believer in capturing the MOMENT, mistakes and all... old-school. If you haven't seen him live, I highly recommend it.



    And, he can boogie too...


    He's also hands down one of the best drummers I've ever heard. Extremely talented man.

  49. #198

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    How about this guy - a modern day bluesman who brings a lot of the past.



  50. #199

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  51. #200

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    Poor Leslie...