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  1. #51

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    Can't forget Ray Charles...



    Carol Kaye on the bass here.


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Is that Russell Malone with Dianne Krall?

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug B
    Is that Russell Malone with Dianne Krall?
    Yes.

  5. #54

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    Grahambop - loved your photos, especially of Muddy and Chuck. And I was just about to share Mannish Boy. What a great album that was/is!

    Anyway, here's Johnny. Always preferred him over Stevie.

    I actually worked this one out pretty well when I was 15:


  6. #55

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    Sent from My Blog Page

  7. #56

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  8. #57

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    JAMES COTTON, CHARLIE HADEN, JOE LOUIS WALKER

  9. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    it is precisely a reduction of the blues to a musical dimension, and even more a Western vision of the blue note on the third, between major and minor, as it always presents itself in African music, the "so called" african pentatonic mode, which are far from the degrees of temperate music (listen for example to xylophones). Even the great musicologist and composior André Hodeir (Ana Livia Plurabelle, Bitter Ending, from James Joyce), admirer of Duke Ellington and Charlie Parker, and great connoisseur of contemporary composition Art music, is sning himself on this subject (book Hommes et problèmes du Jazz, 1954)

    from this point of view, I rather agree with Joelf

    moreover, "Roots" has a relatively precise meaning about the history of the American Black People
    Hemiola: do you know about it? Anyone else? Got something to do with harmony and micro-pitches? Anyway, I think it's different than Western tempered pitch, or is it?

    Edumacate me...

  10. #59
    OMG---how could we not? Self-flagellation begins promptly---with a National Guitar:


  11. #60
    OK, wags---here's a poser:

    If Western diatonic harmony dictates that I is major and V major or dominant---how do you explain the blues form?

  12. #61
    I was there!!

    And the thrill is not gone 50 years on:

    paul butterfield woodstock - - Video Search Results

  13. #62

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    BB at Sing Sing prison

  14. #63

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    Muddy Waters at Newport, 1960



    He came a good ways from this (-not that there's anything wrong with it!)


  15. #64

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    A smattering (35 minutes) of Louisiana-seasoned blues.


  16. #65

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    Need some Professor Longhair here.

    Love the "mambo-rhumba-boogie thing" ( as Allen Touissaint called it) that 'Fess played so well.

    From "Rock 'n' Roll Gumbo".

    Professor Longhair: piano, vocals, whistling. Snooks Eaglin played guitar with him on many classic sides. Dr. John played guitar for him too. (Dr. John started as a guitar player.) Clarence 'Gatemouth' Brown also played guitar for Professor Longhair.






  17. #66

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  18. #67

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  19. #68

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    the great Robert Nighthawk tearing it up...


  20. #69

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    and one of, if not the very first guitarists to play a picked solo, Lonnie Johnson
    from his duets w/Eddie Lang on Okeh records, to 1963 @ the American Folk and Blues Festival in Europe


  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Muddy with Tele:

    Attachment 69227
    muddys red tele with the fender amp knobs!!...classic

    cheers

  22. #71

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    Hollywood Fats left us too soon.

    Here's Fats with Muddy (and Steady Rollin' Bob Margolin) in 1973. (Fats is not featured here at all; this is more to place him in context.)




    And one of Fats' best known cuts with his own band.


  23. #72

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    also love jump blues or west coast blues...one of the greats was teddy bunn...played alongside charlie christian... early session guy as well...

    here's a blast of west coast blues about a bay area club..from 1949

    jacksons nook-teddy bunn...raucous tone



    cheers

  24. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    and one of, if not the very first guitarists to play a picked solo, Lonnie Johnson
    from his duets w/Eddie Lang on Okeh records, to 1963 @ the American Folk and Blues Festival in Europe

    I was not aware of his electric work! What lovely playing... Fab voice too.

  25. #74

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    the great Tiny Grimes


  26. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    also love jump blues or west coast blues...one of the greats was teddy bunn...played alongside charlie christian... early session guy as well...

    here's a blast of west coast blues about a bay area club..from 1949

    jacksons nook-teddy bunn...raucous tone



    cheers
    Look Teddy started off as a jazz player in the 30's.


  27. #76

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    Grimes was also in Tatum's trio earlier as well as recording w/Bird



  28. #77

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    Now tell me that Charlie here doesn't sound like he's coming out of the blues?


  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    Grimes was also in Tatum's trio earlier as well as recording w/Bird

    yeah just wrote about that in the LEARNING CHARLIE PARKER "DONNA LEE" SOLO? thread!!

    tatum trio with tiny and slam!! great stuff

    tiny played a 4 string tenor...with the guitar like d-g-b-e tuning

    cheers

  30. #79

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    Speaking of Slam, he had the bowing humming thing down. Others did it, like Major Holley but Slam was the man, perfect intonation.
    Caught him when he came through as part of the Lionel Hampton All Stars and he stole the show!
    Here he is in Red Norvos band in '45 w all star lineup including Bird and Diz....

    Last edited by wintermoon; 02-16-2020 at 08:39 PM.

  31. #80

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    Another cut...these cats are flyin!


  32. #81

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    Can't leave out the legendary Slim Gaillard, Jack McVea takes the 1st chorus and then Bird just....flies!


  33. #82

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    Bill Jennings. "Big Boy" may be his best known number among jump blues lovers.
    Two versions of "Glide On" here.






  34. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Because we've gotten so far away

    And just because...
    I wonder how far away is this ? (go to 44:46 if the link doesn't take you):


  35. #84

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    Some blues from Herb Ellis.



    The intro to this one, "Sweetheart Blues" always reminds me of Horace Silver




  36. #85

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    Big Bill Jennings fan here!!! Enough Said is a great album- the title track and Blues Jams are full of tasty stuff !! Jack McDuff on organ too!!!



    watch out Hendrix - Jennings was there first with the upside down git

    Will

  37. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77


    makes me want to get a dobro. Lonnie Johnson always one of my favourites - out and out blues player but with Ellington, Louis. And Eddie Lang, the classical and ragtime influence.... there’s jazz right there.
    Not a dobro, a 12-string.

  38. #87
    Teddy Bunn is on this recording, with the fabulous singer and human Hadda Brooks.

    (I myself spent a very memorable month give or take accompanying Our Ms. Brooks at Michael's Pub back in Autumn '93).

    If you've a mind to go to youtube and punch in Hadda Brooks and The Thrill is Gone. (Go for the one w/the pic of Bogart and a woman in a car). She gave me chills singing this every night, rubato w/light strumming and bass bowing. This one will, too. (Might be Sinatra's guitarist Al Viola on it if there's guitar).

    Brief bio: she started as a boogie woogie pianist with 'race record' hits in the early '40s---then someone with some sense listened and realized what a special ballad singer she was. Appeared w/Bogie in In a Lonely Place, had more hits with That's My Desire and Out of The Blue, worked for some years in Australia, and was the first woman of color in the US to host her own TV show...

    Last edited by joelf; 02-17-2020 at 12:23 AM.

  39. #88
    Oh, what the hell:



    (Dig especially how she's just about crying on the bridge, then comes way down to finish. What a moment!

    (Edit) No doubt about it---Hadda and Al Viola throughout, with some discreet piano at the very end...
    Last edited by joelf; 02-17-2020 at 12:09 AM.

  40. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Some blues from Herb Ellis.



    The intro to this one, "Sweetheart Blues" always reminds me of Horace Silver



    Yessir! Great album!!

  41. #90

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    cc with teddy bunn (and slam stewart on bass!!) circa 1940...often attributed as being some sort of gibson promotional event!

    bunn looks pleased..cc pensive!!! telling



    cheers

  42. #91

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    MINGUS BLUES & ROOTS, Crying the Blues

  43. #92

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    Man.... I just feel better. Thanks for all the posts. (dang I’m old)

  44. #93
    Lest we forget:


  45. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by rahsaan

    great clip...buddy at his best!! & the mighty rashaan rk shadows guys vocals, on single horn and then doubles/triples/horn sections the main lines...kirk..what a genius!! one of the true greats..highly underrated these days...he was hugely respected in his day..very popular performer!...& massive great talent

    to play one horn as well as he..well ok..but to play 2 or 3 ..simultaneously...and with taste & panache!!

    cheers

  46. #95

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    My favorite version of "Down the Road Apiece."

    "Man, it's better than chicken fried in bacon grease!"


  47. #96

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    Tab Benoit, a Tele man from Lousiana. Used to see him at the old Rock'n'Bowl in NOLA. Good times.


  48. #97

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    I learned the hard way that R&B is Gospel on vacation. All that's left of me is the gambler's blues.
    And the lonesome blues
    The old gigolo blues
    The Vegas blues
    The counting California license plate blues
    The gas station blues...

  49. #98

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    ^ never too late to end the vacation

    bluesmen extraordinaires--cooder & lindley



    cheers

  50. #99

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    hooker n van



    cheers

  51. #100

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    I started on harmonica, that's all I could afford. Sonny Boy Williamson, James Cotton, Sonny Terry, got me on my way in the blues. When I could afford a cheap shitbox guitar, learning to play slide seemed the logical thing to do to make it sound better and play easier. Robert Johnson, Fred McDowell, and all those delta players were my first teachers, and my first love was the delta blues. That's what started it for me as a player.

    Remember everyone, for us older guys, pre-internet was a big challenge to get your hands on stuff to listen to, and the old blues records were not just waiting in the record stores for us to discover. You really had to be a diligent explorer, just like jazz.