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  1. #1

    Gypsy Jazz Study Thread

    Would anyone be keen to start a gypsy jazz study thread?

    Like posting a tune a week or something to work and discuss about. Would be pretty chill

    But dunno if anyone actually plays this style anymore hey lemme know

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  3. #2
    I think it's probably one of the more popular styles currently, just maybe not so much here, lots of boppers here.

    I got very into it about 8 years ago, for about 2 years, kinda ended up hating a lot of it...but I'd be more than willing to share any of the stuff I learned...there were some good things I took from it that I still use...
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    I think it's probably one of the more popular styles currently, just maybe not so much here, lots of boppers here.

    I got very into it about 8 years ago, for about 2 years, kinda ended up hating a lot of it...but I'd be more than willing to share any of the stuff I learned...there were some good things I took from it that I still use...
    Sweet man would love for you to share some of your knowledge in the style

    Also if you dont mind me asking, what did you end up hating so much about the style?

  5. #4
    I found it very prescriptive...you gotta have this guitar, you gotta pick this way, play rhythm this way, use this pick, play these songs. The higher level players aren't like that, but I wasn't a higher level player! A lot of guys played too loud, had no interest in dynamics, and didn't care that multiple other guitars were drowning out a soloist. Again, I was playing at "hack" level, being a hack at it myself, but I found it very frustrating...there's also little interplay between players a lot of the time, rhythm guy just bashing out chords while everybody else just waits for their turn to solo. I found the whole nature of it kinda "anti-jazz" really.

    I did meet one really cool guy right away who was a big rule breaker. He still plays in this style, he's gotten quite goid, and he has his own voice. Much more patient than me, I guess.

    In the end, I think what I found more refreshing about playing other jazz styles is that there wasn't another guitarist (or 3)
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    I found it very prescriptive...you gotta have this guitar, you gotta pick this way, play rhythm this way, use this pick, play these songs. The higher level players aren't like that, but I wasn't a higher level player! A lot of guys played too loud, had no interest in dynamics, and didn't care that multiple other guitars were drowning out a soloist. Again, I was playing at "hack" level, being a hack at it myself, but I found it very frustrating...there's also little interplay between players a lot of the time, rhythm guy just bashing out chords while everybody else just waits for their turn to solo. I found the whole nature of it kinda "anti-jazz" really.

    I did meet one really cool guy right away who was a big rule breaker. He still plays in this style, he's gotten quite goid, and he has his own voice. Much more patient than me, I guess.

    In the end, I think what I found more refreshing about playing other jazz styles is that there wasn't another guitarist (or 3)
    Haha yea man I totally get what you're saying. Feel like a lot of the time its a style that caters for guitarists wanting to get into jazz hence the lack of subtlety in most but it dosn't have to be like that! But yea I know what you mean about how it is a very defined style as in you gotta do this, this, this etc.. but that's why I like it... as in no ones really gone too far outside the box yet which leaves a lot of room for exploring new ideas and implementing new concepts to the music whilst still retaining the essence of what makes it such a romantic happy music.

    Dont think I could ever only do gypsy jazz though would probably drive me a bit insane but everytime I come back to this style its refreshing asf from all the modern egotists.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by mike335 View Post
    but everytime I come back to this style its refreshing asf from all the modern egotists.
    what do you mean? you can’t avoid egotists in any style. I can’t even think of a style that had a lower % of egotists lol. I mean, have you seen this: You will give up playing after this

    Lots of beauty in the style though.
    White belt
    My Youtube

  8. #7
    I actually think the egos can be way worse in gypsy jazz, depends really, but any environment where you have multiple people playing the same instrument can breed competition/fuel ego...

    Anyway, now that I trashed gypsy jazz, let me talk about the parts of it that I think are great...

    First of all, the really great players, the Ferres, Moignard, Stochelo, Wrembel, scores of others...they don't stoop to egotistical playing. The difference is night and day.

    Second, Ithe really taught me how to learn songs FAST, and melodies by ear, as most GJ guys use the simple shorthand "grilles"

    I also really happen to like the grilles system for writing out tunes.

    It taught me that you can accomplish a lot playing chord tones, enclosures, and being rhythmically interesting. It's people's music...no esoteric theory needed, the chords give you all the info you need.

    And I complained about the repertoire, but it's actually a nice that the rep is pretty small, you learn a few dozen tunes and you can play with anyone anywhere.

    And last but not least...gypsy jazzers play Autumn Leaves in the right key
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  9. #8
    So anyeay, what I've learned...I'll start with this...you can't be impatient (like me)

    You need to learn to gypsy pick (or at a bare minimum, be very conscious of using downstrokes/rest strokes as often as you can) and you need to learn the right moves for rhythm. There's free 30 second or so videos by Denise Chang on YouTube that break it down into micro movements...it probably comes off as overly pedantic, but I haven't seen anyone else explain the quick up stroke that begins the whole move better.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  10. #9
    I would potentially be interested. I studied the picking and stuff for a while and feel I finally finally start to get it, but haven‘t built a repertoire yet.

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    what do you mean? you can’t avoid egotists in any style. I can’t even think of a style that had a lower % of egotists lol. I mean, have you seen this: You will give up playing after this

    Lots of beauty in the style though.
    I think i'm referring more to my personal relationship between the two and yea i've seen that vid... cant say its quite what im going for XD

  12. #11
    I've just started the Wrembel book. I'd be keen to learn with others.

  13. #12
    I’m in! My little combo Parlor Swing (guitar/male vocal, guitar/trumpet, violin/female vocal, upright bass) plays a mix of GJ and early Swing. We’re not a traditional GJ group, I play an L-7, the other guitarist uses a flat-top acoustic. We love the music but aren’t trying to be authentic. Still, I’m an intermediate player so I have a few things to share and lots to learn. Where do we start?

  14. #13
    I liked the beginning of the Wrembel book but then he apparently ran out of words and I never finished it.

  15. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    I found it very prescriptive...you gotta have this guitar, you gotta pick this way, play rhythm this way, use this pick, play these songs. The higher level players aren't like that, but I wasn't a higher level player! A lot of guys played too loud, had no interest in dynamics, and didn't care that multiple other guitars were drowning out a soloist. Again, I was playing at "hack" level, being a hack at it myself, but I found it very frustrating...there's also little interplay between players a lot of the time, rhythm guy just bashing out chords while everybody else just waits for their turn to solo. I found the whole nature of it kinda "anti-jazz" really.
    Wow you also just described bluegrass, old-time and even Celtic jam sessions!

    To the OP:

    Robin Nolan has a lot of great instructional material as well as a bunch of concise YouTube lessons and he doesn't talk too much so like so many other musicians on YouTube. Robin gets right to the point gives you a nugget you can use and that's it.

    His site Gypsy Jazz Secrets

  16. #15
    Hey, I'm a gypsy-jazz guitarist and would be happy to share knowledge / answer questions / whatever.

    Also, it's getting late in the game, but for people in the U.S. I highly recommend going to Django In June, which happens next month. Basically a full week of nonstop gypsy-jazz learning and jamming. This year Angelo Debarre, Sebastien Giniaux and Gonzalo Bergara will be on the teaching staff.

    Adrian

  17. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by alltunes View Post
    Wow you also just described bluegrass, old-time and even Celtic jam sessions!

    Yeah, basically, the "jam session" in general is a cross genre cesspool of ego.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by alltunes View Post
    Wow you also just described bluegrass, old-time and even Celtic jam sessions!

    To the OP:

    Robin Nolan has a lot of great instructional material as well as a bunch of concise YouTube lessons and he doesn't talk too much so like so many other musicians on YouTube. Robin gets right to the point gives you a nugget you can use and that's it.

    His site Gypsy Jazz Secrets
    Right on! Robin Nolan is my fav instructor on the subject right now, very informative, relaxed, great sense of humor, and yes more playing than talk, very important for me as well!

    As a bonus, he's big AC/DC fan, (check out his custom Gypsy SG guitar!), and he does killer GJ covers of the 'DC tunes.

  19. #18
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    Christiaan van Hemert

    I don't know if he is on this forum, but I like watching his YouTube videos. Then again I like watching Jimmy Bruno's YouTube videos. What good am I?

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