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  1. #91
    YEA Kris... Love Scofield... who doesn't. Always saying the right things. And yes he has his own blues feel. He does really get behind the beat and makes rhythm sections... stay in the pocket. Sometimes.... even slow down.

    Chaka... haha, I named one of my dogs Rufus. I bought that album... still probably around somewhere.

    And yes...Mr b... Pkirk is great musician, I always dig his posts.

    Nice version ragman... You might try and organize the spatial thing different, the physical shape of the performance. 6 min. is a long time. I like the use of 6ths... maybe use them at a target point to help shape... You have a beginning... and at some place a turning point, by that I mean, now your heading towards the end. Or not, nothing wrong with floating along.

  2. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by Reg View Post
    Nice version ragman... You might try and organize the spatial thing different, the physical shape of the performance. 6 min. is a long time. I like the use of 6ths... maybe use them at a target point to help shape... You have a beginning... and at some place a turning point, by that I mean, now your heading towards the end. Or not, nothing wrong with floating along.
    Thanks for your comments. I can't say I thought about it, just played it as it came out. I know it turned out long at 6 mins but I didn't want to stop :-)

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gramps View Post
    This is really cool kris. There is a lot of interesting harmony happening.

    When I started messing with the song I found I couldn't play it as fast as I thought I should. Using a slow (115bpm) bossa track for learning has helped relieve some of my frustration with speed and it's fun to just find a relaxed groove for learning.

    Thanks. This really helped me.
    Thanks a lot
    I will send more examples next week.
    jazzingly
    kris

  4. #94
    It occurred to me that I ought to just play this tune normally - uptempo, swung 8ths, the usual thing. And I thought because it bores me, it feels as though I'm just producing a product, same as everybody else. There's no real expression in it or new ideas.

    So I thought I'd get it out the way. It's take 1 and I admit I wasn't busting a gut over it. You can all take it to pieces if you want but it is what it is :-)


  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by kris View Post
    Thanks a lot
    I will send more examples next week.
    jazzingly
    kris
    Thanks kris! Do you think you can demonstrate the ideas in 1/8th notes?

  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    It occurred to me that I ought to just play this tune normally - uptempo, swung 8ths, the usual thing. And I thought because it bores me, it feels as though I'm just producing a product, same as everybody else. There's no real expression in it or new ideas.

    So I thought I'd get it out the way. It's take 1 and I admit I wasn't busting a gut over it. You can all take it to pieces if you want but it is what it is :-)

    Hi ragman1.

    I hope you don't mind me posting but I really like this track because it references standard swing phrasing to me. I know you're always trying to play something different and as an artist that's the job. On the other hand referencing your ideas against a genres 'cliches' just makes it sound like jazz to me.

    I really like this. Thanks for posting.

  7. #97
    Quote Originally Posted by Gramps View Post
    Hi ragman1.

    I hope you don't mind me posting but I really like this track because it references standard swing phrasing to me. I know you're always trying to play something different and as an artist that's the job. On the other hand referencing your ideas against a genres 'cliches' just makes it sound like jazz to me.

    I really like this. Thanks for posting.
    Not in the slightest, I'm glad you're back and feeling better. And I'm glad you like it!

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg View Post
    YEA Kris... Love Scofield... who doesn't. Always saying the right things. And yes he has his own blues feel. He does really get behind the beat and makes rhythm sections... stay in the pocket. Sometimes.... even slow down.

    Chaka... haha, I named one of my dogs Rufus. I bought that album... still probably around somewhere.

    And yes...Mr b... Pkirk is great musician, I always dig his posts.

    Nice version ragman... You might try and organize the spatial thing different, the physical shape of the performance. 6 min. is a long time. I like the use of 6ths... maybe use them at a target point to help shape... You have a beginning... and at some place a turning point, by that I mean, now your heading towards the end. Or not, nothing wrong with floating along.

    Thanks Reg for your nice post.
    I've found great text last night.
    I think it will be usefull for all of us:

    What No One Tells You About Learning Jazz Improvisation | jazzadvice.com

    Anyway I am waiting for your pesentation about 8 bars blues.

    All The Best
    kris

  9. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gramps View Post
    Thanks kris! Do you think you can demonstrate the ideas in 1/8th notes?
    Ofcourse.
    8th and triplet 8th exercises at slow tempos...:-)
    Best
    Kris

  10. #100
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    There are different exercises with straight notes.
    only 16 bars of "take the A" - this is only conception what I am doing with quoter notes,8th,8th triplets,and 16th.
    Changing every two bars:


    https://app.box.com/s/8v78i179zz8wotnb8cq73h2h1upjxntl

    https://app.box.com/s/8yzaajhe3of7blfy0adwum8hkd626gcm

    https://app.box.com/s/5acd17jebohbez7r67tjrm5seky83e79

  11. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by kris View Post
    There are different exercises with straight notes.
    only 16 bars of "take the A" - this is only conception what I am doing with quoter notes,8th,8th triplets,and 16th.
    Changing every two bars:


    https://app.box.com/s/8v78i179zz8wotnb8cq73h2h1upjxntl

    https://app.box.com/s/8yzaajhe3of7blfy0adwum8hkd626gcm

    https://app.box.com/s/5acd17jebohbez7r67tjrm5seky83e79
    Thank you for your generosity kris. I have tomorrow off work. Perfect timing.

  12. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gramps View Post
    Thank you for your generosity kris. I have tomorrow off work. Perfect timing.
    Have a nice guitar practise day.
    Best
    Kris

  13. #103
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    What's a thread...?
    it's so quiet after " deep cleaning" and over 3000 looks in 2 weeks...nice!
    good for jazz...:-)
    jazzingly yours
    kris

  14. #104
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    I am playing around with diminished and augmented. Where might you use them in this tune for comping and or soloing?
    “When you’re creating your own ...., man, even the sky ain’t the limit.”
    Miles Davis

  15. #105
    Well, over the D7#11 you could play:

    The wholetone scale (D E F# G# Bb C D)
    The Lydian Augmented scale (D E F# G# A B C D). This is really A melodic minor from D.

    Over the unaltered D7 in the bridge you could play:

    The whole-half diminished scale (D Eb F Gb Ab A B C D) to get a b9 sound, if you think it suits.

    Over the G7b9 at the end of the bridge:

    The whole-half diminished scale (G Ab Bb B C# D E F G)

    Some versions end with 2 bars of C6 but some have a Dm7-G7 turnaround. You could maybe use the G wholetone scale there to get a G7#5 sound.

    (That's probably it, you don't want to overdo it. Doubtless someone will introduce all sorts of triads and other tricks derived from these scales but I'll leave that to them ).

    If this is too simple for you, try Jens Larsen's video site. He's got lots of stuff on diminished and augmented 'secrets' :-) Jens Larsen
    - YouTube

  16. #106
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    Thanks and do you think of this when you are playing or do you hear it/sing it. eg do you think wholetone scale over the D7 or do you hear/sing the b9?
    “When you’re creating your own ...., man, even the sky ain’t the limit.”
    Miles Davis

  17. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by gggomez View Post
    Thanks and do you think of this when you are playing or do you hear it/sing it. eg do you think wholetone scale over the D7 or do you hear/sing the b9?
    I've already thought of it in the sense I know that those options work. When I come to a chord I'm usually thinking what I'll do over it, like A mel for the D7#11. I never work out exactly what I'll do because it destroys spontaneity. But I know what notes sound good, I know to put some emphasis on the #11 note, etc etc.

    I tried the wholetone over the D7#11 and found the sound repetitive after a while but still used it. Also the D alt (Eb mel) worked too.

    Same with the other chords. I don't sing them but I do know exactly how a B, A or D is going to make the C chord sound, for instance. Over the Dm7-G7-C I know I can use some sort of generic phrase that ends up on the C chord; it doesn't have to match the chords exactly.

    When I was playing the straight D7 I was at the 10th fret, I think, and automatically went to the Eb and ran down a diminished arpeggio. Luckily it worked :-)

    The G7b9 is in the lead sheet anyway (the melody note's an Ab) so that was more obvious. That called either for a diminished scale or arpeggio or just a straight G7 idea with the Ab thrown in. F melodic minor works very well too for a b9. And there was also always the option of the altered scale.

    I've played the tune so many times now the options are pretty well ingrained; I feel confident just launching into it and going for it. I mean, since all these tunes often repeat the same chord sequences, especially swing numbers, after a while it becomes second nature. But I'll still try things out to make sure.

    This is why I prefer playing tunes to exercises. After a while you get a nose for what will work best over a specific tune.

    I'd thoroughly recommend recording your practice if you're not already doing so. No one else needs to hear it and you'd be amazed at what you discover listening back to it. After a while it all becomes part of you.

  18. #108
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    power of melodic minor scale

    For all beginers players:
    Do not think too much about scales.
    Most important scale in jazz is melodic minor I think.
    Concentrate on using this scale over Take The A changes:
    a min melodic,d min melodic,Ab min melodic,g min melodic,c# min melodic
    there are:
    a min melodic over D7b5 or D7#11
    d min melodic/or d dorian/ over dm7
    Ab min melodic over G7/can be altered/
    g min melodic over gm7
    C# min melodic over C7/with alteration/...
    Creat 8th solos using this scale with nice melodies and nice phrasing.
    Great piano video but can be adopted for guitar:

  19. #109
    Don't think too much about scales.
    Think about lots of melodic minor scales!

    (gggomez wants to know about diminished/augmented sounds)

    I find with melodic minor that you have to be careful with the #6 and #7 sounds. They don't automatically sound good everywhere.

  20. #110
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    melodic minor scale

    I have one beginer sudent,that he know probaly more than me about scales but practicaly he don not know how to use them .
    So my sugestion is to learn more about one scale first/melodic minor/.
    This scale has everything if you want to creat nice solos not only at beginers levels.
    I recomend:
    Barry Galbraith "Daily Exercises in the melodic & harmonic minor modes" and Emily Remler Edu videos.

  21. #111
    It's like I was told many years ago...better to know 5 things and really KNOW them than to KNOW OF 50 things.

    (but for jazz, if you're gonna know something outside the good old major scale, melodic minor is where it's at...at least know how to access it's sounds, even if you can't run the scale up and down the neck)
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Of what use is a dream, if not a blueprint for courageous action?"

    --Adam West, as Batman, 1966.

  22. #112
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    It's like I was told many years ago...better to know 5 things and really KNOW them than to KNOW OF 50 things.

    (but for jazz, if you're gonna know something outside the good old major scale, melodic minor is where it's at...at least know how to access it's sounds, even if you can't run the scale up and down the neck)
    Very near consensus outside of guitar-specific discussions.

  23. #113
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    min mel

    There are a lot of patterns,licks with minor melodic in books or on youtube played by top musicians .
    So how to use it in good way is no so simple.Learn patterns,practise licks in every key,adopt to the style of your playing... it take years.
    what's a hard work...
    My first expierience with this scale was years ago when I started to transcribe and analyse 2 5 1 progressions. It was in 70's.
    ...and the next step - modes of melodic minor....
    Best
    Kris

  24. #114
    melodic minors
    I'm not disagreeing

    (It's why I prefer A mel to D wholetone over D7#11)

  25. #115
    By the way, I have a joke for you, saw it yesterday.

    Did you hear about the drummer who gave all his daughters the same name?

    Anna 1, Anna 2, Anna 3...

  26. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    By the way, I have a joke for you, saw it yesterday.

    Did you hear about the drummer who gave all his daughters the same name?

    Anna 1, Anna 2, Anna 3...
    About jazz guitarists...:-)
    A 2 , A 5 , A 1

  27. #117
    I used to live in a Flat 5. My jazzy friends thought it was very funny :-)

  28. #118

  29. #119
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    is it another joke?
    Last edited by kris; 01-19-2018 at 10:19 AM.

  30. #120
    Quote Originally Posted by Reg View Post
    Yea there is a balance between playing, practicing and then actually talking about the music. Very few can just play... very few.

    So maybe a question... when we look at Take the A train... what do you think, what's your process to becoming aware of the tune how to perform etc...

    The Form is pretty straight ahead, A A B A. 8 bar sections.

    So the melody is not so clear, it hints at a few different directions.

    Personally I either play or hear the tune as a Blues or a jazz pop tune.

    The blues seems more common approach, but the I VI II V pop approach works.

    The A section is basically an eight bar blues, and the B section finally goes to the IV chord.

    The difference for me is how I approach the II chord in the A sections and how I approach that chord in the B section (both D7)

    So I either hear the D7 as a sub of some type, in the "A" section of, sub of A- the VI- chord .... or a V of II....anyway the reason I'm bring this up is because, personally how I hear the changes.... what type of function I hear the chord as having opens different doors of improvisation.

    I'll post something later and show the differences...

    Thanks for comments, and looking forward to becoming part of thread again.
    Hey reg. Would be interested in hearing these "different takes" on it if you have time. Thanks.

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