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  1. #1

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    New to Jazz guitar, so sorry if its a silly question.

    First chapter of Jazz Blues Guitar, the first shell chord is described as being made up from the Root, 3 and 7. But the chord shown is a dominant (F7) made with the 7b (Eb).
    Is this a Jazz/Blues thing? is it still in the key of F?

    Sorry if I'm being thick, just want to get the basics straight in my head before moving on.

    Ta.

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  3. #2

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    Hey, dominant 7th chords have a b7 in their constructions, 1-3-5-b7, that's all.
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  4. #3

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    Yes, the tonic in a jazz blues is nomally a 7th, ie a chord with major 3rd and a flat 7th. In fact most chords in a blues are 7th chords.

  5. #4

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    The blues sound/tonality is based on dom7 chords. In jazz you sometimes will encounter maj7 chords but it's dom7 most of the time.
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  6. #5

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    Actually it's not that silly a question. The notes of shell voicings are usually just called the root, third and seventh. *

    Technically, though, the notes are designated according to their relation to the major scale of which the root is the tonic. So the major7 is R,3,7, the dominant is R,3,b7, the minor7 is R,b3,b7.

    Why, I don't know, since they're not in the same key. But don't let it put you off

    And they're really easy to work out, which is more to the point. You just move the notes around.

    Shell Chord question (Jazz Blues Guitar Vol 1)-gm7-jpgShell Chord question (Jazz Blues Guitar Vol 1)-g7-jpgShell Chord question (Jazz Blues Guitar Vol 1)-gmi7-jpg


    * Not all shell voicings are R,3,7. Major and minor 6th chords don't have the 7 and there are others like diminished and augmented chords which don't either.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    PMB - I couldn't open your attachments so I don't know what they were!
    Just the shell inversions for basic 6th and 7th chords. Here they are again:

    Shell Chord question (Jazz Blues Guitar Vol 1)-shells1-jpgShell Chord question (Jazz Blues Guitar Vol 1)-shells2-jpgShell Chord question (Jazz Blues Guitar Vol 1)-shells3-jpg

  8. #7

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    PMB -

    I couldn't open your attachments so I don't know what they were!

    7 chords are 4-note chords, R 3 5 7. The 5th is generally sacrificed because its sound isn't essential to the nature of the chord. Also, in cases where the bass or other instrument is playing a root note, the guitar need not play that either, hence 2-note chord comping!

    In the case of 6 chords the 6 is instead of the 7, not the 5. The exceptions are diminished and augmented whose essential sound depends on b5 and #5. But their shapes still have the R and 3. These two are C dim and C aug:

    Shell Chord question (Jazz Blues Guitar Vol 1)-co-jpgShell Chord question (Jazz Blues Guitar Vol 1)-c-jpg


    (edit)

    It's often confusing for a learner because shell voicings can have more than one name and hence serve more than one purpose. For example, this shape could be a Gm6 or a G diminished chord:

    Shell Chord question (Jazz Blues Guitar Vol 1)-gm6-jpg
    Last edited by ragman1; 09-11-2017 at 01:36 AM.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by PMB View Post
    Just the shell inversions for basic 6th and 7th chords.
    Quite, but I wasn't going to complicate things with inversions. Poor guy's just beginning :-)

  10. #9

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    One good thing about shell voicings, if you're into simplicity, is that the most complex chords can be played with minimal effort. Anything beyond the 7 - like 9, 11, #11, 13 - can just be played as a 7. Also, any chord with an altered 5 or 9 can be played as a 3-note voicing because the 5 isn't included.

    So, for instance, E7#9 - Am13 - Dm11 - G7b9#5 - CM9 can just be played as E7 - Am7 - Dm7 - G7 - CM7 (using shell voicings).

    Of course there's a temptation to neglect one's learning of full chords, which one shouldn't do.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by SJL1;801621
    First chapter of Jazz Blues Guitar, the first shell chord is described as being made up from the [B
    Root, 3 and 7[/B]. But the chord shown is a dominant (F7) made with the 7b (Eb).
    A shell chord is not a new type of chord, it is a voicing and a method to play the chord on guitar.
    When a shell voicing is described as root 3, 7 it simply means that you play which ever 3 (minor or major) which should be the chord and which ever 7 (minor or major) that belongs in the chord.

    As has been stated previously, dominant chords have a minor 7th. (that's their defining charecteristic).

    Dominant chords are then in turn a defining characteristic of the blues form.


    Is this a Jazz/Blues thing? is it still in the key of F?
    You can have a rather lengthy disucssion with rather many appproaches of what key you're in when you play blues in F.
    I kind of see blues as a separate type of "key" but you also think of it as F mixolidian or F minor pentatonic for instance (and then you can have a key change on the next chord change).

    However you choose think of it, most would agree that F is the "tonic" in F blues.
    Tonic means the "home" or the I (one in roman numeral) in the piece.

  12. #11

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    7 means b7 and is different from 7M. It's a code.