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  1. #1

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    This thread discusses our All The Things You Are lesson:

    All The Things You Are - Chord/Melody + Solo

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    ATTYA was the first song I studied when I was learning about key centers (Howard Roberts seminar) many years ago.

    As a side comment, One of the best jazz guitar inprovisation versions of this tune is performed by Hank Garland on "Jazz Winds From A New Direction". We all referred to Hank Garland as "Sugarfoot" when he was making a lot of records out of Nashville. I think he surprised a lot of jazz people when he made his jazz record. His chops were unbelieveable!

    Also, it is worthwhile to note the melody of ATTYA is made up mostly of 3rds & 7ths from the chords used in the song.

    wiz

  4. #3
    Stringbean Guest
    Thanks for the lesson, I dig.

    I went on youtube and checked out some takes by the greats. Metheny 1980, and a more recent clip at Montreaux. Those guys left me way in the dust, after the melody all I heard was streams of notes. I can't follow the harmony yet. Hard work this listening to jazz. And this is a beginner tune!

    There's a Gambale solo take on there also, sounds good.

  5. #4
    Very good exposition of ATTYA - however, it makes sense to work this out for yourself for other tunes and also for ATTYA. For example, many people play a Calt (III7alt of Ab i.e. V7 of VI) without the G-7b5 in bar 24, and I think of this as the transition to the Ab section (in the key of Ab).

    Similarly, the turnaround final bar of G-7b5 to Calt can be thought of as still in the key of Ab. This simplifies things as you no longer need to think of the one bar of F-, which normally would not count as a modulation in any case because it is so short. The most important thing is to use whatever helps you to make sense of the sequence, to memorise it, play it in any key and so improvise on it.

    Also in bar 32 B-7 is often played as opposed to B diminished 7, making a descending chromatic sequence of minor sevenths - sounds good and means that Matt's improv sequence can be preserved (i.e. 3,5,7,9) through this section.

    The key sequence then becomes: Ab Major, C Major, Eb Major, G Major, E Major, Ab Major.

    So you can think of the first 8 bars in any key as an extension of the basic II-V-I (VI-7 II-7 V7 I IV) followed by a modulation up a Major Third (II-7 V7 I).

    Second 8 bars- identical to first 8 in a key a Perfect Fifth up from original key.

    Bridge (bar17) stay in the key of second 8 bars, basic II-7 V7 I, modulate down Minor Third with II-7 V7 I, return to original key in last bar of bridge with a III7alt of original key.

    Last section has same first five bars as original section (VI-7 II-7 V7 I IV), next 4 bars a chromatic descent from IV-7, III-7, bIII-7, II-7 bringing you to the closing II-7 V7 I. (Bar 30 could also have a bVII7 (Gb7 in the original key of Ab) which would make it a "back-door progression" to Ab.

    The more you can think of large chunks instead of chord by chord, the easier it is to remember, comp and improvise on.

    All the best.

    Bill

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringbean
    Thanks for the lesson, I dig.

    I went on youtube and checked out some takes by the greats. Metheny 1980, and a more recent clip at Montreaux. Those guys left me way in the dust, after the melody all I heard was streams of notes. I can't follow the harmony yet. Hard work this listening to jazz. And this is a beginner tune!
    In my opinion, there is no such thing as a beginner's tune. If there was, it wouldn't be ATTYA. It might be So What. It might be. Maybe not. Autumn Leaves? I don't know. Things You Are is like Stella - 32 bars, through composed, not easy. Give the legendary Jan Garbarek (ECM saxophonist) either tune and he won't play them *grin*

    Well there is jazz, and then there is jazz.

    If I were to advise, you didnt ask, but what the hey -
    Go slow. Then, even slower ;p

  7. #6
    Baltar Hornbeek Guest
    I was reading on the Fender website that Dizzy's arrangement of this tune used the Hendrix chord, dom7#9. It doesn't say where, but I guess it could fit on any of the many V7 chords?

    Also, where is Matt W? His lessons are top notch.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Baltar Hornbeek
    I was reading on the Fender website that Dizzy's arrangement of this tune used the Hendrix chord, dom7#9. It doesn't say where, but I guess it could fit on any of the many V7 chords?

    Also, where is Matt W? His lessons are top notch.
    in the intro that diz played, which has become 'standard'. (it is in the new real book and the real book 6th ed...and various other versions.)

  9. #8
    Baltar Hornbeek Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by randalljazz
    in the intro that diz played, which has become 'standard'. (it is in the new real book and the real book 6th ed...and various other versions.)
    ahh, thanks ....this song just keeps getting better
    Last edited by Baltar Hornbeek; 04-20-2010 at 10:51 PM.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirkji
    This thread discusses Matt's harmonic analysis of All The Things You Are:

    All The Things You Are | Chords Analysis and Guitar Examples
    Hey Matt,
    I went through your lesson with much interest. That's true "All the Things" is quite intricate harmonically. It must be studied and performed regularly to really understand it.

    The version you posted is one of my favorite!
    I studied the transcription years ago. It's a must for anybody who is serious about learning to play jazz guitar. It made me want to go back to it and go through all those beautiful lines once again.

    For those who are wondering where to find it, it's available in a book called "Joe Pass on Guitar".

    Happy playing to everybody!

  11. #10

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    For those who are wondering where to find it, it's available in a book called "Joe Pass on Guitar".
    Highly recommend it too!

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by shadowguitarist
    Highly recommend it too!

    Great book!
    I stronglly recommend it. All the music is transcribed incredibly well!
    It comes with a CD as well

  13. #12

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    Hi Guys,
    I am extremely new in Jazz
    I fall in love with this tune.
    Is there any simple chord melody arrangement for me to learn this?
    Thank you very much for your help.
    Vagabond

  14. #13
    if u look in the forums somewhere there all the things you are explained its extremely helpfull and shows you pretty much everything u need to no about the tune

  15. #14
    I think it would be a great idea for this website to start a thread along the lines of Chordal Anaylsis of Jazz Standards starting with the ones most Jazz students need to learn early on.

    "All The Things You Are" is a great starting point (which has already been done) followed by "Rhythm Changes" and then some "Jazz Blues"(major and minor).

    We have a lot of talent on this site and I'm sure the contributions would be eye opening for us all.

    A list of other startup tunes I would recommend are:
    "Autumn Leaves"
    "Girl From Ipanema"
    "Misty"
    "Body and Soul"
    "Maiden Voyage"
    "Footprints"
    "Summertime"
    "Watermelon Man"
    "All Blues"
    "Impressions"
    "Wave"

  16. #15

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    Still playing with the new camera...trying out a "semi-arrangement" of ATTYA...hope you enjoy.


  17. #16

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    Nice. Enjoyed your post. Perfect to chill to after a hard afternoon gig. Some real fancy and intricate lines. This cat can play.

  18. #17

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    Very pretty, really enjoyed the way you connected the chords.

  19. #18

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    Great stuff, Mr. B. Very informative, really appreciate being able to see how you incorporate chords into the runs, how everything lies on the fretboard.... and the new camera sounds/looks good....

  20. #19

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    Beautiful guitar playing. Makes you you realize how great that song is.

  21. #20

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    Jeff, Like it, thanks. My personal preferences with regard to what I liked better in the solo: polyphony/ interval/chord improvs and use of space and silence, that gives the sense of breadth to the expression and expression that also breathes. Fast single note runs, I'm not getting much into, these days, but that goes for everyone's playing, starting, first of all, with mine.

    Thanks! I thought the video was a tad dark, but that could have just been my screen.

    As for software, I always suggest, for use of video/audio by artists and artistically inclined persons, get a Mac. Comes built-in with iMovie and Garage Band, which are free, with excellent pro apps that are or will become industry standards (Final Cut Pro, Logic Studio Pro).

  22. #21

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    I really enjoyed this. Great overall mood.

  23. #22

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    Hey Mr. B. very cool, nice to hear you let go a little. Beautiful version... I'm pretty fried on original... man... are you an old rocker, I dig watching your fingerings and default, as JP has me saying, phrases. Just to make sure... that's a compliment... I grew up going to Filmore and the other hangs as a kid back in the 60's... great post... thanks. ( you sure have the intense look goin on... ) one of your fans... Reg

  24. #23
    Sounds very nice!! Many great sounding elements here, I'm sure you could easily make a recording with a clear beginning, middle and end. A little clearer structure and you have one track for your solo guitar album! :-)

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    are you an old rocker
    Most definitely am, of the Jerry Garcia ilk--he was my first guitar hero...I'm pretty sure you can still hear that in my playing...

    Thanks all for the compliments everybody...as for the video editing, the camera did come with something, but it's also "clunky." I think I just have to play around with it a little more.

  26. #25

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    nice music. very nice. how old is that tune? written about 80 years ago? what a great song it is.

    not sure if there's a whole lot of "good morning little school girl" or "truckin" in there though.

  27. #26

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    I gotta listen again myself...do I do the little "descending triplet pulloff?" that's a Jerry lick that never goes away.

    And any Django-ism's you hear are really Jerry-isms. Jerry loved Django, I heard Jerry years before I ever heard Django...so I'm ripping off Jerry ripping off Django, for the most part.

    I was actually amazed when I started getting into gypsy jazz last year how nicely Jerry Garcia licks translate to that style of music...everything is everything, y'know? Thanks Lauren Hill.

  28. #27

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    Holy crap;;;mr b ,that is one moving piece of music and i want to thank you for the inspiration,i need to go practice.As it says in victor wootens book that i just read,"boy do i have a lot to learn"take care man and peace.

  29. #28

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    Nice job Jeff. I have been working on that tune as well. I play 1st verse last verse, Affettuoso, with swing in between. Thanx for posting.

    Roll away the dew Brother, Franklin's Tower awaits us all.

  30. #29

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    Very, very nice Mr. B!! I love your tone and the way you express yourself with your chord melodies. It really a treat for me to see your good videos and gain some insight into the way you put together your chord voicings. I'm sorry I can't offer any advice on the video approach, I am a novice on video stuff (just bought a low cost camcorder to learn how to do videos).

    wiz

  31. #30

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    Thanks Jake and Matt.

    Yeah, for the first time in a long time I am completely happy with my tone. Now to work on being completely happy with my playing (which I assume will take longer but cost less! )

  32. #31

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    What other tunes feature the IV / iv / iii / flat iii dim progresson found towards the end of ATTYA?

  33. #32

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    Check out the late Ralph Patt's site for similar progressions in tunes: The Tonal Centers Page

  34. #33

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    Hi all, ehh - I always get through very close to 36 bars when playing ATTYA...

    :-), cheers, Jan

  35. #34

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    I have been looking at this tune for a few weeks now. I have chord voicings worked out and a rather straight forward chord melody worked out. Just trying to work out some interesting single note lines now. I am finding this article to be helpful in that regard.


    Danielle

  36. #35

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    Please take a look at the attached file. The song is from the real book & it has an example of the chords "Am7b5 & D7" in one bar, E7#9 in another bar, F#m7b5 in another and finally C7#5. These chords play a different role to the keys in the song, but what would those roles be & what would you call the chords?...can someone help me please
    Attached Images Attached Images All The Things You Are-all-things-you-jpg 

  37. #36

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    They are basically 2-5-1’s. So Am7b5 then D7 are a ii-V7 into the G chord which follows. The E7#9 is a V7 going into the Am chord which follows. Just your standard dominant to tonic move which is everywhere in these tunes.

    By the way your first bar is mislabelled, should be key of Ab not A.

  38. #37

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    thanks graham, but m7b5 chords are half diminished, so Am7b5 - D7 - Gmaj7 can't be a II V I

  39. #38

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    Numbers can be major or minor. Then he said Am7b5-D7 was ii-V7 into the G, which is correct.

    ATTYA is in the key of Ab, not A as written in the first bar after the intro.

    One point about this tune is that often it employs what they call modal interchange. You can look that up but basically it means the ii-V are the minor version of the 2-5 going to the major chord - i.e. instead of Dm7-G7-CM7 it's Dm7b5-G7b9-CM7. It's a nice trick that gives a bit of flavor to the sound.

    The rest of your chart looks okay. But you better check.

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by jibzy
    thanks graham, but m7b5 chords are half diminished, so Am7b5 - D7 - Gmaj7 can't be a II V I
    as the others have said, I was careful to say ii V implying the minor i.e. Am7b5.

    Doesn’t always resolve to the minor, can go to the major as here (Gmaj7).

  41. #40

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    Anyway, apart from all that -

    "Am7b5 & D7" in one bar, E7#9 in another bar, F#m7b5 in another and finally C7#5. These chords play a different role to the keys in the song, but what would those roles be & what would you call the chords?
    We've explained the Am7b5 to D7 to G.

    The F#m7b5 to B7 to EM7 is the same idea again in E.

    ***************

    The E7#9 is going to Am, it's the V chord (E7 - Am)

    The C7#5 is the V of Fm7, which is the next chord (C7 - Fm)

    ***************

    What do you mean 'what would you call' the chords'? I'd call them by their name. I'd describe their function as the ii-V to the I, or whichever it is. Unless you mean something different.

    It doesn't matter very much what the extensions are when looking at chords, they just give a bit of colour to the sound. Really the first line is Fm - Bbm - Eb7 - Ab - Db, which is all in Ab, then it's G7 - C, obviously in C. Then it repeats the same thing a fourth lower in Eb and G... etc.

    Look at it simply, it's easier to understand that way. Always look at chords in context, not in isolation.

  42. #41
    What class is this for?

    Anyway, I think you'll do better to try these search engine terms:

    Roman numeral analysis "all the things you are"

    Here's one: All The Things You Are - Chord/Melody, Analysis & Guitar Examples

    Sent from my SM-J727P using Tapatalk

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by jibzy
    Please take a look at the attached file. The song is from the real book & it has an example of the chords "Am7b5 & D7" in one bar, E7#9 in another bar, F#m7b5 in another and finally C7#5. These chords play a different role to the keys in the song, but what would those roles be & what would you call the chords?...can someone help me please
    I don't know how much help it'd be but I have a thread and we look at a tune a week to be practiced and discussed in that week. The second week in January, post 293, we looked at this tune.
    Commit to a song a week. What could a serious student hope to learn?
    there might be some thoughts in there that may be helpful. You're also welcome to take part in this thread/group and your questions would be a nice jumping off point for some nice discussions.
    David

  44. #43

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    The analysis helps in understanding the music theory structure. I can learn the songs slowly in order to play them right, but I want to figure out Chord tones, Rhythm, Voice leading, difference between the sound of chords etc...all these are a part of the melody


    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    Ok, but what about playing it? What do you think is the relationship of the analysis to the notes/sounds you'd use to actually play the tune?

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by jibzy
    Please take a look at the attached file. The song is from the real book & it has an example of the chords "Am7b5 & D7" in one bar, E7#9 in another bar, F#m7b5 in another and finally C7#5. These chords play a different role to the keys in the song, but what would those roles be & what would you call the chords?...can someone help me please
    You've identified them correctly as dominant functioning chords that go to tonal centres other than the home key. This piece is nice in the way it uses unexpected "adjectives" to highlight resolutions and temporary changes in the keys we hear. It's constantly refreshing itself in that way.
    Are you familiar with the different types of dominant progressions, chords that point to a resolution? They are quite interchangeable and familiarity of these devices will go a long way in describing the way we perceive tonal shifts and modulations.
    Sorry if this is an oblique comment, I'm trying to see where you're coming from.
    David

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by jibzy
    The analysis helps in understanding the music theory structure. I can learn the songs slowly in order to play them right, but I want to figure out Chord tones, Rhythm, Voice leading, difference between the sound of chords etc...all these are a part of the melody
    So I take it you're playing chord melody as opposed to single notes over a backing?

  47. #46

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    Yeah, I'd be careful with over analyzing...recognizing movements like the ubiquitous ii V I is certainly helpful, but when starting out, identifying whole sections of a tune as being in one key can be a double edged sword...certainly, it simplifies things...but if you actually just play, say Ab and C scales over the first 8 bars...it's not really going to sound much like jazz.

    A tune like this...I'd write down all the guide tones (3rds and 7ths) and watch how they move from chord to chord. All the Things is a great tune to really go after playing the changes, because they move in such a logical way.

  48. #47

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    I've had a look at progressions, but I need to understand "chords that point to a resolution"

  49. #48

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    Chords that 'point to a resolution' means just that. If you play a G7 by itself it doesn't go anywhere, it just sort of hangs. It's waiting for the next sound to resolve it, which is what happens when you play CM7 after it.

    Well, I suggest you go onto YouTube where there are several CM instruction vids for ATTYA. Also Matt's article above does the same. In fact, that might be easier.

    You can easily look all these sorts of terms up but 'voice leading' means the notes of each chord slip into each other nicely, you're not just playing slightly disconnected shapes willy-nilly up and down the board.

  50. #49

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    To follow up what Jeff said, try not to fall into the trap of playing 'intellectual guitar'. That is, if you must get involved in theory, make it practical and applicable. Don't get lost in a lot of conceptual thinking that's very difficult to relate to playing actual music.

    If you discover the guide tones, i.e. 3rds and 7s, that's fine but you may find it very awkward to make your fingers go there when improvising. Fine on paper but it'll sound forced and unnatural in practice. Far better to use your ears and play what appeals to your musical sense. Then you may well find that you're gravitating to those notes instinctively. Try it and see.

  51. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by jibzy
    I'm new to jazz & I want to learn how to analyse songs, to make them easier for me to understand. There's no class or private teacher either
    Okay. That's cool. Again, I think "Roman numeral analysis" is a pretty good search term for these things. You'll probably find them all over the Internet. Look at YouTube especially.

    All the things you are is a "mother tune". Really important to know, for all the things it has to teach about jazz harmony, among other things. If you're new to this type of Roman numeral analysis, start with Autumnleaves, and then, fly me to the Moon. Those are like younger sisters to all the things you are. Not as sophisticated, haven't gone off to college and experience the world as much yet, but easier to digest. You'll see the patterns in all the things you are better when you understand those more solidly.

    "Borrowing from minor" is really important in a lot of these tunes. Write out all the scale degrees forcords in natural, harmonic, and melodic minor. Especially the first two, for analysis purposes.

    You should instantly recognize a minor 2-5, even if it's used in a major key and resolves to a major chord. You'll begin to see things like Vim and bVII -type movements as well.

    Join David's thread for sure. He is very knowledgeable , experienced , and ESPECIALLY... generous. You'll learn more in that TUNE context.

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