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  1. #251

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Then there's this: 2 diminished 7th chords played a 4th apart. Jazzers use it as a 5 chord. It came from classical composers, who had an entirely different usage in mind.

    Don't ask me what it was, though (LOL). I ain't no egghead...
    if I'm not mistaken, it gives a diminished scale whole tone-semi tone with as tonic that of the first chord. We get the same thing with two diminished 7 chords to an interval of one tone, exp Cdim7-Ddim7, instead of Cdim7-Fdim7 (4th). I find it easier to explain it like this. As complete chords of 8 notes, it's quite complicated to name, minor chord (b3) with 7 & 9, and the choice of b5th or #5th, a 4th and a #11th, a 6th > 13th, or to name them otherwise

    Classical composers have done it, melodically, much the same as jazzmen. Am I wrong? It is explained (Wikipedia) that the 10th Sonata of Scriabin begins with an augmented scale followed by a diminished scale. 1913, it was before Messiaen

    I've changed, I find it more enjoyable than Horowitz ;-)
    Last edited by Patlotch; 02-15-2020 at 10:55 AM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #252

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    Also I remember this book

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Twentieth-C...5398/ref=nodl_

    the idea of Modern Harmony in jazz really relates to the idea of jazz being this hermetically sealed history in which we envisage, as Conrad Cork put it, ‘Harmony as the Engine’ of development, in which modern jazz has more progressive harmony than the old and that the main thing to look at. Cork, as well as people like Wynton Marsalis reject this....

    the reality is more complicated. This move exists to some extent, but early jazz musicians were contemporaries with Debussy, Ravel and Schoenberg... and checked out their music.

    I mean as a random example, I was listening to this the other day - check out the piano break before the (incredibly hip) verse after the chorus
    : also check out the end chord...

    subtle touches and not in a Mist or dance of the octopus by Red Norvo (a very odd record) but the music of this era is full of these touches that suggest a much wider palette of sounds beyond the standard changes of the time. Didn’t often end up in tunes themselves of course. Or in most pub Dixieland band covers of these songs.

    But yeah, it was true that post-Louis pre-60s jazz was much more adventurous music layered on top of the harmonically formulaic but highly melodic popular tunes of the day. Louis playing all the notes on those vanilla chords. Original tunes sometimes gave more of a idea of where future compositions might go, when the harmony of the compositions themselves might be emancipated from these pop norms. As Monk’s teacher had it:


  4. #253

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    hey Christian... back on Inner.. Is that maj7#9#11 with nat. or flat 13th.... just curious. That Har. Min. and Maj or MM thing.

    yea, Joe... it's always been application.

    Hey Pat... yea loved Scriabin's later works, and his last, op74, the Etudes, really opened my ears back in the stone ages. Anyone who gets into metaphysics must have had different views about music.

    I tend to use Subdominant types of function when hearing and performing Jazz. That whole Dominant / Tonic approach just doesn't cover much of jazz performance. Great when verbalizing and horizontal analysis... but, well that in it's self can become modern harmony. (probably not, but good for discussion).

  5. #254

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    What I most like these days are not-quite-chords where there's no 3rd or 7th and you can put in your own or leave 'em out. Like power chords or a chord like C2. I think I copped this from Tom Harrell, but he's hardly the 1st to have used this in jazz. A favorite vamp that I use on Gentle Rain in A min and my own tune Perk up in F is (in A Minor) C2/A Bb2/A (A and E bass 1st 2 beats, then those 2 chords with pedal (from bottom: GCD/A FBbC/A) on three and the and of four, carrying into the next measure tied to a whole note w/crescendo. It really gives a lift off to the solos.

    Funny thing: they're so simple and useful in so many situation b/c of the open sound. And they sound great on guitar in the lower positions w/open strings. They're also nice for contrast when you have more complex changes in the rest of the tune, like chiaroscuro. And the open sound draws the listener in---an unconscious sense of expectation for harmony to fill in more---at least the way I hear it. Then when you do state it fully---add the missing intervals---boom, climax !

  6. #255

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    hey Christian... back on Inner.. Is that maj7#9#11 with nat. or flat 13th.... just curious. That Har. Min. and Maj or MM thing.
    I like 13... b13 and #9 sounds like movement, not colour, to me.

  7. #256

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    What I most like these days are not-quite-chords where there's no 3rd or 7th and you can put in your own or leave 'em out. Like power chords or a chord like C2. I think I copped this from Tom Harrell, but he's hardly the 1st to have used this in jazz. A favorite vamp that I use on Gentle Rain in A min and my own tune Perk up in F is (in A Minor) C2/A Bb2/A (A and E bass 1st 2 beats, then those 2 chords with pedal (from bottom: GCD/A FBbC/A) on three and the and of four, carrying into the next measure tied to a whole note w/crescendo. It really gives a lift off to the solos.

    Funny thing: they're so simple and useful in so many situation b/c of the open sound. And they sound great on guitar in the lower positions w/open strings. They're also nice for contrast when you have more complex changes in the rest of the tune, like chiaroscuro. And the open sound draws the listener in---an unconscious sense of expectation for harmony to fill in more---at least the way I hear it. Then when you do state it fully---add the missing intervals---boom, climax !
    I like that too.

    I'm getting more comfortable with leaving at least one of the guide tones out of things. Guide tones are kinda lame, are they not? I think you have to learn them but then if you use them all the time you sound like jazz school. Over-explaining the changes.

    I think leaving the 3rd out of the dominant is basically the best way to sound a little modern ... although Lester was doing that back in the 30s of course... softening the perfect cadence. And then there's Wes. However things like Gm7 or Eb/G used as a sub for G7 have that very 'I'm too cool for jazz school' feel.

    Also this type of thing
    5 x 5 x 7 x - which Peter Bernstein described as a Monk voicing
    5 x 5 4 7 x A13b9 (no 3rd)

    I like using maj7sus2 (or a triad a fifth higher over the root like G/C for Cmaj7) which is a bit prog, but you can use for minor, so hey.

  8. #257

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    Guide tones aren't lame to me, maybe over-done. They're good when there's just 2 melody instruments and no chord instrument...

  9. #258

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Guide tones aren't lame to me, maybe over-done. They're good when there's just 2 melody instruments and no chord instrument...
    That might be a better way of putting it haha. On the other hand, roots are good. Nothing wrong with a good root. Somebody's got to play it, and despite jazz educations weird attitude towards them, often more than one person.

    Roots are cool. Guide tones are OK I guess

  10. #259

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