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  1. #26

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    A good model for that tune is Wes Montgomery's
    'Four on Six", which is Summertime with some substitute changes used.
    Copy Wes' solo, or look for transcriptions.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    Try D Dorian or D melodic minor the ma6 sounds nice. A lot of the lead sheets have really basic change like four bar of dmi so add some movement with a Emi7b5 A7 alt on second bar of Dmi that gives you more possible scales to use.

    When in situation where you're bored sing a solo then transcribe what you sang. That's a problem people have on all instruments is they keep falling back to what's familiar or limitations of current skill level. When you sing you eliminate the limitations and finger going for familiar patterns.

  4. #28

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    one version I play Cm...Cm/Bb...Bb...A7b5...from angel eyes...

    slow blues...one beat per chord...ala Burrell...

    one version I play Am...Bm...C...Bm...two beats per chord...moderately up...from Burrell/Grover Washington...

    time on the instrument...

  5. #29

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    You guys are just spectacular. I am so glad I found this site. I am learning so much . Thanks !

  6. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Montgomery
    Here's some basic changes that work:

    ||: Dm/maj7 | Eb9#11 | Dm/maj7| Am7b5 D7#9 | Gm7 | Fm7 Bb9 | E7#9 | A7#5 | Dm/maj7 Bm7b5 | Bb13 A7#5| Ab13 |

    | Gm7 C7b9 | Fmaj7 Ab13 | G13 A7#5 | Dm/maj7 | Eb9#11 | Dm/maj7 | Eb9#11 :||

    Most of these chords will lend themselves to a nice workout with modal applications for "Jazz" Melodic Minor scales.

    For example, use D melodic minor for Dm, then play Bb melodic minor for Eb9#11, and so on. If you don't get it, I can tell you more if you like.
    Please do.
    Melodic minor is: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
    D melodic minor is D E F G A B C# (almost Dorian except for C#)
    Eb9#11 is Eb G Bb Db F A (so hmmm G, Db, F and A are common noted with D melodic minor).
    Bb melodic minor is Bb C Db Eb F G A (so OK all the notes of Eb9#11 are covered)

  7. #31

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    have a listen to the
    summertime on the Miles Porgy and Bess
    album
    Gil Evans arrangement is sublime
    also Miles is fabulous on this

    theres a youtube of jim mullen
    playing summertime where he's
    quoting Gill's horn parts
    (to my ears anyway)
    its a nice approach

  8. #32

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    Two things: First, you're not gonna want to hear this, but playing scales over chord changes is the best way to sound like a beginner. Think about this idea ... decide what chord structure you want to use, and list all the notes in all the chords, measure by measure (for now). Also list all the melody notes for each measure. No need to organize these notes into scales; you're just concerned with the notes. These are good notes to start using, along with notes a half-step away from any of them that sound natural to play as you approach any of the notes. This doesn't cover everything, but you'll be able to make interesting melodies that fit the song. Chordal tones + melody notes (which will be chordal tones, anyway).

    Second, dig up Wes Montgomery's "Four On Six". Learn as many of his lines as you can and transpose them to your "Summertime" key. Most all of them will work over "Summertime" ... very similar changes. And the 4 on 6 changes suggest some cool "outside" ideas for "Summertime".

  9. #33

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    Thank you so much for ratifying the little insight I had the other day! You never know when it'll come to you, as I was stepping out of the restroom it "hit me." :-) Learn the chord progressions really well and then project those images onto the fingerboard and then think in terms of argeggios & lyricism.

  10. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzfreak
    Thank you so much for ratifying the little insight I had the other day! You never know when it'll come to you, as I was stepping out of the restroom it "hit me." :-) Learn the chord progressions really well and then project those images onto the fingerboard and then think in terms of argeggios & lyricism.
    "as I was stepping out of the rest room"

    Some guys do their best thinking once their dick is no longer in their hands!

    Are you currently working with an experienced jazz guitar instructor? This revelation you had while you were peeing is very basic fundamental jazz improv stuff. I don't say this in an insulting or demeaning way. It's just that if you have access to a good teacher, it'll help you around some of the frustration noted in your OP about getting bored with just playing scales. Even if it's for only 3 or 4 lessons . . it'll work wonders.

    Also, don't become too reliant upon only arps for your lyricism. That too will start to sound amateurish after a while . . . unless of course you become as brilliant at creating with arps as Wes was. ;-) As you're working with the arps . . look for the tensions as well. Then, search for your own way and desired lyricism in resolving them back to the arp tones. Create you lyricism using the full spectrum of scales, arps and tensions and chromatics.

  11. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzfreak
    Thank you so much for ratifying the little insight I had the other day! You never know when it'll come to you, as I was stepping out of the restroom it "hit me." :-) Learn the chord progressions really well and then project those images onto the fingerboard and then think in terms of argeggios & lyricism.
    Like scales, arpeggios are just shelves to store notes. That they outline chords makes them more useful than scales, but we really ultimately want to "sing" through the guitar. Sing a solo phrase ... play it. As you work on chords and start to understand every possible note that could be in a given chord at a given point in the harmonic structure, you are simultaneously grasping most of the notes that will make up creative and lyrical melodies, which are the main ingredients of a good solo.

  12. #36

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    Thanks, Super. I can tell you're a great teacher. Wonderful feedback.

  13. #37

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    Well, summertime is dying now, so...


  14. #38

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    Summertime ain't what it used to be, yet the song remains...