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  1. #1

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    Discussion about this beginner lesson about arpeggios: Jazz Guitar Arpeggios - The Best Beginner's Guide | Jazz Guitar Online

    You can post all questions or general feedback about this tutorial in this thread.

    - Dirk

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    (1) I take it position A means the A of CAGED (could for me since I'm comfortable with that!).

    (2) First para here says working in the key of A major--but this is G maj right?

    Looking forward to more along these lines.

    --TJE

  4. #3

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    1. actually, no. i think he's referring to fifth fret position, A on the 6th string. The chord here would be more based off the "E" shape in this CAGED system i hear everyone digging...well, E minor.

    2. yes, Am to D7 would definitely put us in G major

  5. #4

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    Thats was a good idea. I like the way you present your information. Easy to understand and I like how there is 3 different ways to show the fingerings for the arpeggios. What other ones are you making?

  6. #5

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    Hi I studyed and practiced the D7fingering in the fifth position I did find it awaked to use I started with my third finger on A third finger on D first finger on C what would you siggested for fingering on the f# thanks for any help Aaron

  7. #6

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    easy to read and comprehend. great visual aids.

    keep up the great work helping out us noobs!

    Thunder

  8. #7

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    Can you please tell me the differance between an arpeggio and a pentatonic scale? Don't they both play the notes of a chord?

  9. #8

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    well, arpeggio refers to a specific chord, so a cmaj7 arpeggio would play the notes of that chord, C, E, G, and B, or Root, third, fifth, seventh.

    a more complicated chord would have a more complicated arpeggio

    the major pentatonic scale uses the Root, 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 6th note of the major scale, so C major pentatonic...

    C, D, E, G, A

    The minor pentatonic starts from the sixth degree and uses the same notes-- so the relative minor of C, A minor, pentatonic would look like this

    A, C, D, E, G

  10. #9

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    5th position D7 - are you barring it or using fingertips?

  11. #10

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    [chord]

    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|-1-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|-4-|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|-2-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|-3-|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|

    [/chord]

    or


    [chord]

    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|-4-|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|-1-|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|-3-|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|-1-|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|

    [/chord]

    F#'s in red...not totally sure i understand your question, but i hope this helps...

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron J. Halpern
    Hi I studyed and practiced the D7fingering in the fifth position I did find it awaked to use I started with my third finger on A third finger on D first finger on C what would you siggested for fingering on the f# thanks for any help Aaron
    Aaron, here's the fingering for the D7 arpeggio:




    ----------------------------5-----8------------
    -----------------------7---------------------
    ---------------5---7--------------------------
    -------4---7----------------------------------
    ---5-----------------------------------------
    ---------------------------------------------

    Fi:-2---1----4---1----3----3-----1-----4

    Make a bar with your 3rd finger.

    Does that answer your question?

    - Dirk

  13. #12

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    Sorry guys, the A major was a typo, of course it's in G major.

    Pete - yes, I'm barring.

    Thanks for the clarifications Mr. Beaumont.

    All the Best,
    Dirk

  14. #13

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    Dirk fingering works out very well,now I can work on my speed using those fingering thanks for the help Aaron

  15. #14

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    Now I can work on my speed using the correct fingering on that lesson ,the other 2 appeggios work find thanks for your help

  16. #15

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    I'm not sure I should do this, but I believe in simplicity. All music can be
    done alphabetically with particular attention to fingering (boxed or caged, for guitar players) and aural, the ear. George Benson admitted he's not a great reader.
    Anyway, who has time to write it down when you're making it up. To help ear training, is to write a solo down without the aid of the guitar or instrument. That can be unreasonably difficult if you don't know where to play it, or how to finger it, etc. True irony, especially in terms of education; a person with all faculties does not learn to speak any language by knowing an alphabet. It's all aural. It's later, one is forced into the other mode of education. Let's not talk about folks without all faculties. That's where true amazement begins.

    Learn to say the musical alphabet (ABCDEFG) in any direction, from any point.
    One can do this in the shower and on the way to work. It is so pathetically easy. This alphabet can be numbered equally as easily. 1-7(-13). Later, a
    real cheap trick. Learning intervals (aural, fingering, etc) becomes a breeze.
    Just doing this takes a very, very short time.

    For example, ii V(7) in G or Gm. It doesn't matter, it's A D (alphabetically). In Eb = F C, so forth. One can use this logic in any key or no key. Harmony is the next lesson, and that can be done purely alphabetically. maj, min, dim and full dim. What a hustle.

    To go a bit sideways looking at Pents with the example used, sort of.
    Play Am pent and Amaj pent together. Or Cmaj pent and Cm pent together.
    See what you come up with. Love those prepositions.

  17. #16

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    Any idea on what the next 101 is gonna be about dirk??

  18. #17

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    thanks for all off those wonderful idea, like the one about saying and receiting the music alphabet every which way I will practice that until I know it every which way, a lot to absorb in your reply I will take one step at a time reading is something I want to acomplish, it has taken years ,and years to understand it,I do take lessons from a teacher in Mass, for about 3 yrs, he is teaching me music from the Rosenburg Bros,standards also have learned a lot of new chords, has you probly know yourself, appreciate all your imput Thanks a lot to everyone that can help Aaron J. Halpern I use my real name because thats who I am.

  19. #18

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    Aaron, nice to see you here, but it would make it alot easier to understand what you are saying if you put periods in your sentences. Thanks.

  20. #19

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    i found this lesson easy to understand and digest and realy look forward to a lesson regarding more complicated arpegios,just a thought when told to improvise over the chords in question are the arpegios emphasised or solly played.

  21. #20

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    Hicksy, what do you mean by 'are the arpegios emphasised or solly played'?

    - Dirk

  22. #21

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    Sean, I'm not sure yet, I was thinking about scales.

    - Dirk

  23. #22

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    I think what is needed is to arpeggiate through specific harmony or keys. Arpeggiate through every key to understand the function of what the harmony is. Inside and outside playing or improv is a manipulation of the harmony, keeping melody in mind. Jam a progression, and improv a consistent melody. You can aurally hear what's going on. And then experiment.

  24. #23

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    I just have to say something about pents or pentatonic. They are the root, vocally, of just about any and every culture I can think of. The key is vocal. Even if you can't sing!!! I can't, none too good. (you do the math) There is some real serious irony in American music; blues, rock and jazz. It's all based on simplicity. What sounds correct is probably correct. If not repeat, make it work. Pents are the beginning of really getting the sound. Major pents is country, minor pents is blues. The twisting and bending is the sound, sort of simply. Ya' have to play with it. Combining the two and bending toward a particular sound will give you a certain result. Combining the two pents sort of, gives you a major scale. It doesn't sound Bach, but he did it too. What a jazzer. After a few hundred years, our culture hears different. A lot of sounds fly that couldn't before. Here's something... You can play Maj blues using just one minor pent... in one spot...

  25. #24

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    dirkji what i meant in an earlier post was previously when improvising over a 2,5,1 progresion i have stuck to playing modes of the major scale for what key it happens to be in,which have contained notes which are not in the chord i,m playing over. Having said that it has,nt sounded wrong but would i be right in thinking that any note which is not in the chord being played over is merely an unimportant passing note used to get to one of the arpegiated notes contained in the chord.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by hicksy
    dirkji what i meant in an earlier post was previously when improvising over a 2,5,1 progresion i have stuck to playing modes of the major scale for what key it happens to be in,which have contained notes which are not in the chord i,m playing over. Having said that it has,nt sounded wrong but would i be right in thinking that any note which is not in the chord being played over is merely an unimportant passing note used to get to one of the arpegiated notes contained in the chord.
    We're going to be talking about combining arpeggios with other techniques, but you can use them as they are as well. For educational purposes it's important to play them without mixing with other techniques until you can play them fluently without thinking and mistakes.

    - Dirk

  27. #26

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    Hey Dirk,
    just wanted to let you know how much i enjoyed your first lesson on arpeggio's. I have been playing a long time, and its amazing how you can overlook the basics.

    Quite often i find myself trying to run before i can even crawl let alone walk. Often i am trying to weave some complicated line through a ii v when i cant even fluentley play the basic arpeggio shapes. So thanks again and i look forward to the next lesson.

  28. #27

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    Dirk - thanks for this. I knew all of these and practise (and teach) them regularly. It hadn't occured to me to use the 2 notes per string versions. I find this very useful - or will when I memorize them.

  29. #28

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    Very Nice Job Dirk! My students will eat this up. BTW, thanks for the great site, there is no better jazz guitar site on the internet!

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by wizard3739
    there is no better jazz guitar site on the internet!
    Amen.

    I have to say, this helped me alot. It didnt occur to me for some reason, that you can play arpeggios in like 5 different positions. I always played in the position where the chord was. This will definitely help to expand my playing creativity.

    But I have a request. Could you put all the notes of the arpeggio together in one diagram so it makes it easier to learn all of the notes them at once? I could learn the 2 seperate diagrams, but it would make it more convenient in one. Just a suggestion.
    Last edited by aPAULo; 05-06-2007 at 02:40 PM.

  31. #30

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    i,m just wondering wether it is best practice to allways start a g major arpegio on the root note or is it best to practice the shapes in the diagrams starting on the lowest note b or f# for example.

  32. #31

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    When you are first learning an arpeggio shape its best to start from the lowest note of the arpeggio in that position. This wont always be the root, depends which position you are in. Once familuar with the shape the next step is to create all different permutations of the notes via various melodic patterns. I'm sure that this will be coming up in a future tutorial. Hope this helps. Enjoy!

  33. #32

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    dirk good afternoon from east Boston MA. 5:20pm tues fingering works a,o,k , Thanks

  34. #33

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    Hiya Dirk,

    Thanks for the awesome lesson!
    I'll be sure to memorize those arpeggio's to expand my vocabulary!

  35. #34

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    Hey Dirk,

    Could you put up 9th arpeggios up too?

  36. #35

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    Dirk that d7 chord appregios helps me out a lot , I'll even add the A,C,on the 6th and fifth strings,can I do this in the tenth position also any help from you or other members would be helpful, Thanks Aaron J. Halpern

  37. #36

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    arpeggios are something i neglect i think of scales a lot more but im blending them in slowly and these lessons help me organise the idea in my head thanks

  38. #37

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    Hi,
    What is the difference between arpeggios and pentatonics?
    What can one use each for?
    Thanks
    Jeff

  39. #38

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    Hi Jeff,

    Arpeggios are broken chords, where the notes of a chord are played in succession.

    More here: Jazz Guitar Arpeggios - The Best Beginner's Guide | Jazz Guitar Online

    Arpeggios are used to improvise a solo. They are a very good starting point because they reflect the harmony of a chord progression. Players like Django Reinhardt use a lot of arpeggios in their solos.

    The pentatonic scale is a 5-note scale that you can use to improvise. It is used a lot in blues, rock, funk and also in jazz (but less). Kenny Burrell uses pentatonic scales a lot.

    More about the pentatonic scale here: The Pentatonic Scale For Jazz Guitar

    - Dirk

  40. #39

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    Hi Dirk,
    Good examples.
    Would you have anything similar to the videos that you did, Stella By Starlight or There Will Be another You, that would show arpeggios and/or pentatonics being used?
    Maybe one of those does?
    Thanks
    Jeff

  41. #40

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    That's a good idea Jeff. I have a lot in the pipeline for 2008. We just moved to a new house and office, so not a lot of time at the moment, but once we are settled here, I'll be back!

  42. #41

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    I would like to have a question answered for me ? The question is in the key of (A) their are three sharps F#,C# and G# could these three chords be the the C#min7, the F#min7,and the G#min7b5.

  43. #42

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    That's correct, Aaron.

    - Dirk

  44. #43

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    Hi,
    Trying to pick out whether a lick is an arpeggio or not
    I was trying to figure out Chris Standrings song, "Through The Looking Glass" on his Soul Express CD. Chris was kind enough to inform me that the song is in the key of Fm. So could his melody line in there be a minor arpeggio?
    Thanks
    Jeff

  45. #44

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    Jeff, Chris Standring's theme is a combination of the Abmaj and Dbmaj arpeggio.

  46. #45

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    I'm a new member and this site and the arpeggion lesson are great. After reading a number of the threads and posts (butch,derek, Mr. beaumont) I'm shifting my study strategy from scales and positions to arpeggios and chord tones. I'm learning the dom. 7ths in all the keys right now. I study them in the cycle of 5ths order clockwise.
    Seems like it would make sense to learn the arps in the 2-5-1 progressions as they're so prevalent in jazz and there's a minor7th, dom 7th and maj 7th in each one. I wrote out the arps for 2-5-1 in C and noticed that the 1st and 3rd of Dmi7 become the 5th and 7th of G7 (D&F notes) and the same relationship happens between th 5 & 1 chords. Lot
    If anyone else has used this approach successfully (arps and 2-5-1's) I'd like to hear about it.
    Great site..so much stuff...
    Thanks

  47. #46
    Chordon Bleu Guest


    Heres some arrpegios.

  48. #47

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    Thanks Chordon Beu I will check these out...

  49. #48
    Gustaff Guest
    first, thanks a lot that you exist, Dirk

    I have mailed you, but you didn't notice it or smth... there's one note missing in half-diminished chord arpeggio's last position starting on A. F note on 5th string is missing, please add it

  50. #49
    Gustaff Guest
    if I'm mistaken then tell me that I'm mistaken...

  51. #50

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    Thanks for letting me know Gustaff. Sorry I didn't get back to you sooner, I can't keep up with my mail.