Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Posts 26 to 34 of 34
  1. #26

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Lionelsax
    I've got the cheapest one I found. Sometimes it stops working by a kind of freezing.
    I've had a cheap looper for a while.
    I sold it quickly - it was not precise.
    The looper then makes sense as it works precisely.
    New technology is constantly evolving.
    New generation devices - you can get addicted.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

    User Info Menu

    About good musicians... They don't need you unless you are perfectly functional or better you've got gigs.
    I mean, you are not lost, you don't have a big ego.
    If sometimes you are lost, they don't want to waste their time. They want to play, they don't want to teach.
    The goal is to be 100% functional, just play and shut up.

  4. #28

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Lionelsax
    About good musicians... They don't need you unless you are perfectly functional or better you've got gigs.
    I mean, you are not lost, you don't have a big ego.
    If sometimes you are lost, they don't want to waste their time. They want to play, they don't want to teach.
    The goal is to be 100% functional, just play and shut up.
    It's not quite like that.
    You may not be a star, but be an efficient organizer and play with good musicians who are willing to play because they do not have organizational skills.
    Jazz is a constant activity.

  5. #29

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by kris
    I've had a cheap looper for a while.
    I sold it quickly - it was not precise.
    The looper then makes sense as it works precisely.
    New technology is constantly evolving.
    New generation devices - you can get addicted.
    This is my looper, cheap but efficient, it works well even if sometimes there is a bug. For what I play I don't think I deserve something better, it depends of my mood, tomorrow I will say something else.

  6. #30

    User Info Menu

    Cool.

  7. #31

    User Info Menu

    I think it's a great happiness to have great children.
    Being a guitar collector is also fun.
    You can treat guitars as part of the family...I think you like these guitars.
    All The Best
    Kris

  8. #32

    User Info Menu

    Interesting views about a looper rather than a band. I've never spent significant time with a looper. Doesn't tickle my fantasy, but that's personal taste, certainly not right vs wrong.

    I've always thought that the fastest way to become a better combo musician is to play with better combo musicians. Or, more accurately, the best players who will tolerate you. The better you play, the better this will work.

    One approach that has worked is to have a book of interesting arrangements and invite people who like to read interesting arrangements. Even great players need to keep their reading chops up - and seem to enjoy doing it. That can work for rehearsal bands. If you have paying gigs, it's easier. I don't think that rehearsal band and gigging band are the same experience (the former allows second tries), but both are ways to improve.

    It is certainly true that some pianists don't leave much room for a second comping instrument or, perhaps, support a soloist skillfully. But, others do. That's just a question of finding the right players. Fortunately, a guitarist can provide all the comping a group needs.

    If people don't want to come back after trying it, I'd suggest listening carefully to the recording of the session and figure out what went wrong.

  9. #33

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    1. Playing with other people.

    I use all the tools on Kris's list (except #6), but the times when I've actually improved have been when I've had regular playing situations. Even if it's just casual jams/get-togethers, or lessons with a teacher who jams with you, you need to actually play, and not just study and practice.
    Yes, this ^^. What do I know? Not a lot but not going to let that stop me from having fun. Robin Ford says just play your guitar, get in a band, it forces you to improve. Of course, we all want to play with someone better than we are. I like Ford because he is a blues man and branched into blending jazz into his blues. I just play at home and even my Lab heads for the door when I reach for my Axe. I focus on the basics and work with Dominant 7ths inversions and arpeggios to cement in the fretboard. Pretty limited here in this crowd but I'm slowly learning. So doing that and my Pandora drum machine. The drum machine, having that rhythm, keeps me playing/practicing with a 4/4, 3/4,6/8 any beat really, if it inspires. The looper doesn't lie so I don't use it enough. All this with what I already have down will chew up 3 or 4 hours, no problem. If I was younger, having a teacher would be a good idea. Of course, listening to the Masters

  10. #34

    User Info Menu

    Effective strategy? Concentrate on making music that sounds good by whatever means necessary. Don’t sweat process, that’s for experts. Compose if you need to, play licks, imitate, whatever gets you there, so long as the sound of it pleases you.

    If you can already play your instrument and have an idea of what you want to do, and what it sounds like, do it. If not, seek out music that interests you. An experienced pair of ears and eyes can be helpful.

    Few guitarists have trouble making up music on the spot; in fact I would say most students could do with doing less improvisation in their practice time and more music learning to expand their knowledge.

    (Presuming you haven’t had had a score centric classical education, in which case you might need to lose some inhibitions around making your own music.)