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  1. #26

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    I actually like licks, as long is it's not a random bout of cut and paste.

    Licks make up a vocabulary. Greg Fishman has two books out called Hip Licks:

    Hip Licks for Guitar | Greg Fishman Jazz Studios

    The first one of the series is transposed for guitar. The later books are not.

    Anyway, great players use licks. That said, it's the HOW of the lick--the way the lick becomes used in a more compositional manner.

    Greg Fishman taught me that. Mr. B is right, I used to be one of those guys that hated licks. It's all in how they are used. I mean, I love Dexter Gordan, Sonny Stitt, Wes Montgomery, and Grant Green. They are players that know how to use licks.

    I think I fell into that bullshite trap. The whole "Jim Hall (or Paul Desmond, or [insert musician]) doesn't play licks, he plays melodies" stuff. Truth is far more subtle.

    There isn't really a dichotomy between "lick" players and non "lick" player. Sonny Stitt and Grant Green know how to weave a solo, licks or no licks. Vocabulary helps you build a story.

    I'm a "music is a language" type of jazz student. By the way, that class that I taught went over quite well. The one I called "Our Musical Language." Too bad I'll never have the chance to teach it again
    Last edited by PickingMyEars; 06-19-2021 at 12:04 AM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    Here's a quick one. Now lemme listen. You guys have been busy.



    [Edit: accidentally deleted the video and had to upload it again]
    Excellent John and a big fat tone! (Archaeopteryx is greek for archtop, right? ;-) )

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont

    TOMMO, really nice feel and perfect tone, imho. Thats the hands at work, not just the equipment.
    Thank you!

  4. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont

    Rag, this seems like the kind of tune you'd hate, so I was pleased to hear what sounded like you getting in to it. Melodic as always...you could sing everything you play...always a good thing.
    No, don't hate it at all, on the contrary. If anything - sorry - it's a bit easy. But you're right about the singing. I do sort of play tunes like I'm singing them. It's not a bad way to do it.

  5. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    If anything - sorry - it's a bit easy.
    Nothing wrong with easy imho.....

  6. #30

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    Absolutely, easier the better!

    Anyway, I've just done this a la bossa. Slight reharm. I have to say I did enjoy it.


  7. #31

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    Rag, I'm getting some Stan Getz vibes. Anymore, and I'd have to call his estate to alert the authorities.

    Definitely some melody going on there. No matter what licks or substitute harmony you might be trying on at that moment, melody reigns supreme.

    Excited to see what else we can come up with this jam session regular.

    Makes me miss jam sessions, but we are almost out of this hell hole of C19:


  8. #32

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    Well, this song is on my all-time great standards top 10 list. And you folks are knocking it out the park with another great thread, IMHO.

    I would get jealous and call you all "show-offs," but that would not be nice. But seriously, you made my day again. (God, I love that song)

  9. #33

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    Jeff: Great take, lots of cool ideas and really tight. I appreciate what you say about playing fast. I do try do it for reasons other than just for the sake of it,

    PME: For sure, what you're trying to do there is difficult. The second was a little better than the first, but I think I'd rather hear you just play and let the time just be what it is rather than listen to you struggle with the Phantom Metronome. But if you must struggle, then struggle you must.

    Tommo: That was a really good take. Lots of good ideas, everything flowing well, and it really feels like you're on top of this tune and comfortable with it. I think this is the best one you've done so far

    TJ: Great take. I think this is also your best so far.

    Ron: Lots of surprises, twists and turns there. I really enjoyed it.

    Rag: I like the bossa feel and what you did with the harmony a lot.

  10. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    Tommo: That was a really good take. Lots of good ideas, everything flowing well, and it really feels like you're on top of this tune and comfortable with it. I think this is the best one you've done so far
    Thank you John.

  11. #35

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    Happy Father’s Day to all you pops on here. Some unusual amounts of free time this weekend I’ll take advantage of! This take two I’m really trying to hold back and be relaxed. My other clips may have energy and drive but many times I feel like a dog running without a leash, trying to hone it back a bit now that I’m a bit relaxed today.

  12. #36

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    Nice lines and very dynamic phrasing TJ - well done!

  13. #37

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    It's a good day when both your kid and your dog wish you a Happy Father's day. Can't believe they have "Happy Father's Day from the Dog" cards now, but it's a real treat

    Triple, I like this relaxed take. I think I hear your previous life as a bass player shining through. All the notes sound locked into the groove. Some of that sounded like what Scott LaFaro would have played on his upright. I still say that transcribing bass solos is an untapped opportunity for everyone else--including us gee-tar players. Paul Chambers played great solos AND great walking basslines.

    I would strongly recommend to anyone who has the stomach for it, setup your metronome app to click every 8 beats (2 measures in 4/4). Then try every 16 beats. For those of you curious about my "phantom" metronome, I left that resource at the bottom of this thread. Added bonus is when you get used to feeling time in larger chunks, it becomes a hell of a lot easier to play faster tempos. Putting the metronome on 2 and 4 above 200bpm always made me feel tense and stressed out. Most of my half time practice these days is 1 and 3 with the metronome (with some 2 and 4 for added spice).

    That said, Triple--you was GROOVIN and MOVIN! Really enjoyed that.

    Doing Time Rhythm Series | Muse Eek

  14. #38

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    Big yes to no metronome on 2 and 4 at high tempos.

  15. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by PickingMyEars
    It's a good day when both your kid and your dog wish you a Happy Father's day. Can't believe they have "Happy Father's Day from the Dog" cards now, but it's a real treat

    Triple, I like this relaxed take. I think I hear your previous life as a bass player shining through. All the notes sound locked into the groove. Some of that sounded like what Scott LaFaro would have played on his upright. I still say that transcribing bass solos is an untapped opportunity for everyone else--including us gee-tar players. Paul Chambers played great solos AND great walking basslines.

    I would strongly recommend to anyone who has the stomach for it, setup your metronome app to click every 8 beats (2 measures in 4/4). Then try every 16 beats. For those of you curious about my "phantom" metronome, I left that resource at the bottom of this thread. Added bonus is when you get used to feeling time in larger chunks, it becomes a hell of a lot easier to play faster tempos. Putting the metronome on 2 and 4 above 200bpm always made me feel tense and stressed out. Most of my half time practice these days is 1 and 3 with the metronome (with some 2 and 4 for added spice).

    That said, Triple--you was GROOVIN and MOVIN! Really enjoyed that.

    Doing Time Rhythm Series | Muse Eek
    Try saying ‘click’ instead of delegating that to a machine. A bit of mild rhythmic independence can be both 1) very challenging for us guitarists and 2) pretty constructive to work on. And fun.

    it’s all too easy to use the metronome passively.

    Then go click with the metronome and see how close you can get it. Check if you can align yourself with it.

    Synchronising with a slow click (10bpm or whatever) is much much easier your playing is effortless/internalised. Going ‘click’ is one way I’ve found to make sure you really know what you are doing. If you get to the point where you are paying more attention to the quality of your mouth metronome than the guitar, I think you are really onto something.

    You can say ‘click’ on every beat and 1 and 3 at fast tempos and get used to alternating quarters and upbeats. Then do a bop head or two. I torment myself students with this stuff, but they do get better. Most of us guitarists need to work on rhythm the most.

    Later, go click on 2 and 4.
    Last edited by Christian Miller; 06-20-2021 at 02:11 PM.

  16. #40

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    I just picked up one of these cheap-o Recording King guitars just because, well, for no justifiable reason. I took it out to the park to meet the birds, some of whom no doubt are ladies ...



  17. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    I just picked up one of these cheap-o Recording King guitars just because, well, for no justifiable reason. I took it out to the park to meet the birds, some of whom no doubt are ladies ...


    Nice. Curious if you happen to be referencing the Campbell / Whiteman Project version from their 2020 release—that's the only version in my "Lady Bird" playlist that features that same prominent #11 accent in the melody like you're doing here.

  18. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by wzpgsr
    Nice. Curious if you happen to be referencing the Campbell / Whiteman Project version from their 2020 release—that's the only version in my "Lady Bird" playlist that features that same prominent #11 accent in the melody like you're doing here.
    No, I'm not thinking of any particular version. I'm just playing it the way I thought it goes from memory.

  19. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by wzpgsr
    that's the only version in my "Lady Bird" playlist that features that same prominent #11 accent in the melody.
    Do you mean simply playing the two #11 notes? Or specially emphasising them in a particular way? If you just mean playing them I can only think of one version (on You Tube) that doesn't play them and that's the Chet Baker version below.

    All the others I've heard play them and they're on all the lead sheets I've accessed so far. Happily open to correction, though.


  20. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    I just picked up one of these cheap-o Recording King guitars just because, well, for no justifiable reason. I took it out to the park to meet the birds, some of whom no doubt are ladies ...


    Like it! Nice little parlor guitar - hope you enjoy it


    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    Do you mean simply playing the two #11 notes? Or specially emphasising them in a particular way? If you just mean playing them I can only think of one version (on You Tube) that doesn't play them and that's the Chet Baker version below.

    All the others I've heard play them and they're on all the lead sheets I've accessed so far. Happily open to correction, though.


  21. #45

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    A rare opportunity to play at home for a few minutes. Feedback appreciated
    Last edited by Peterson; 06-21-2021 at 05:10 AM.

  22. #46

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    John A -

    Thanks, I sit here corrected! Good for Tad.

    Personally I never liked those two notes anyway, I think they sound overly 'boppy' and rather pretentious so I sort of skated round them.

  23. #47

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    I'm officially confused...where are these offensive #11's in the melody?

  24. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    I'm officially confused...where are these offensive #11's in the melody?
    The fifth edition Real book spells them out. Most recordings I’ve heard don’t.

  25. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    I'm officially confused...where are these offensive #11's in the melody?
    At the end of the first melody line - last note in bar four. That's where some play an f# - probably as a tension note. I never liked it too much....

  26. #50

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    OK, I am actually aware of the Tadd Dameron version without those notes E over the Bb chord and A over the Eb cord), and that there are other versions that play F and Bb, and still others that mix and match the variants. I've probably played it all three ways, but the E/A way is the one that stuck in my head. If playing it the way I do makes me overly boppy or pretentious, I guess I'm in decent company. [If I had to guess, I'd say this is one of those oral vs written vs recorded tradition things. Different camps of players passed on the tune in slightly different ways. Check out the Bud Powell and Barry Harris versions.]