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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive
    .

    But this Wayne Shorter's one is a bit of modal jazz too, am I wrong?

    Btw, special request for future jams, Horace Silver? (Nica's Dream!!!)
    Definitely on that line between "modal" and "hard bop."

    Thats really my favorite of the favorite stuff. Like Cedar Walton tunes. Big long modal stretches and then boom-- here's some knotty changes for you!

    Nica's is definitely on my short list for this group. I've been using the scientific method of eeney meeney miney moe to select these tunes, off of a sheet I wrote out that has them divided by style.

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  3. #52

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    Horace Silver, the funkiest comper of them all.

    Glad to hear that, Hep. I was getting worried

    Nica's Dream is a great tune. Mixes a lot of what we've already covered into a swinging little package. K.B played it. Blue Mitchell. Oscar Peterson. Even... Ed Bickert!

    I dunno if Hep and I can nudge ya, Mr. B. Nica's Dream isn't a chestnut standard, but it certainly is called a bunch at jams. And it's post bop hard bop funkatron get ya groove on James Brown in da town... Ya knows what I means

  4. #53

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    I have to sit out the current tune, but I'd to try Nicas Dream. It seems like a very hard tune (to me) but I love it to pieces and would love thew chance to learn it.

  5. #54

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    No rag, its not hard bop, but thats ok-- gotta be true to you, too...and I'd say it still has a nice bounce to it.

    Oh, and it's settled, we'll do Nica next week. Start practicing kids, but don't ignore Night Dreamer!

  6. #55

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    Interesting.

    F#m pentatonic is F# A B C# E. That makes the chord into Gmaj9#11. Lydian sound. Another way to get in that ballpark is to play in the key of the 5th. Meaning play Dmajor scale over the Gmaj7. Thinking penta gets away from the scalar/linear sound by skipping some notes. I think that would work great.

    Gm pentatonic over Fm7: Puts G Bb C D F and makes the chord Fm69sus. Probably sound fine.
    Gm pentatonic over Ebma7: makes the chord Ebmaj69. Will sound consonant.
    Gm pentatonic over D7#5#9 makes the chord D7sus#9#5? The audience will hear F, F# and G, which might sound a little rough.

    E-m pentatonic to C dorian is basically, key of G (minus two notes) to key of Bb (I think in tonal centers even when I shouldn't). There's an issue as to Ab vs A natural, but that's easy enough to select by ear. C dorian has an A natural, which will require some care against the Fm7. As usual, it's quite possible that the theoretically worst note will be the prettiest one you can play. Ebmaj7 has neither as a chord tone, so you can get a #11 sound or not. D7#5#9 has a Bb, so I'd probably prefer an Ab there. Overall, it might be easier to think C natural minor than C Dorian, I suppose. But, they're close enough to wing it.

  7. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg
    yea cool tune. It's interesting all these tune are like from when I was a kid. I played them in late 60's and 70's.
    ( back when I has some chops) . Anyway... Shorter composes in Blocks of sound and then used basic expanded Function.

    By that I mean, we all know understand the Tonic and Dominant thing right, V I and all the versions of. When we get into Modal and expanded Functional movement.... (sorry trying to keep it simple). Anyway Modal Function is almost always Subdominant and Tonic. And what you get is more choices of using Relative relationships with modal function.

    Try just playing E-pentatonic and Cmi dorian over the two bar chord pattern.

    Gma7 F-7 / Ebma7 D7#9. becomes...
    E-7, Pent. to / C-7 dorian

    Which is also the B section. I know this isn't the place but, understanding modal functional devices and then adding Blue notes and MM is a large part of the jazz language for the last 50 60 years. I understand you can still spell changes and use major functional organization, arpeggios.... with embellishments....but if you want to get out of the vanilla framework, there are possible approaches.
    Reg, I do miss the conversations we had in the past that weren't just about scales and harmony. Like, when we had that whole thread going about phrasing in comping and phrasing in single line playing. That and time feel and rhythmic ideas. I know that stuff is harder to put words to without the visual of sheet music and such, just miss that talk as it's oft over looked. Scale and harmony are vital, but without rhythm, groove, and feel--they are just a page out of a music textbook. Give me a key based riff played with pocket, feel, and rhythm over the most complex sub's any day. At the end of the day, for me, it's all about that pocket and being intentional with the "simplest" of nuances in your playing--even if that's basic changes. I'm still not there, but that's my goal. Make the music feel good.

    This is coming from the same person who would OBSESS over ear training back in the day. I still work on my ears, but I view ear training as more holistic. A note fades away without intentional rhythm. I think Chris'77 said it before. The rhythms are king. The rhythms dictate how the note sounds. How does that quote go by Dizzy "I hear rhythms in my head and find notes to hang on those rhythms..." I think I misquoted a little, it's a paraphrase then I thought being intentional with my note choice was the end all be all, and that rhythmic clarity would be easy... WOW, was I wrong. Rhythmic intentionality is the final frontier and the study of rhythm runs DEEP.

    If you don't know who this is, look at the name under my Sound Cloud posts. No hiding it there

    Okay, off my soap box. I think I still kept this post shorter than the usual essays that I used to post in the past. I'm improving, I promise. I checked into Internet Forum Members Anonymous (IFMA) and feeling better already. Plus, the coffee is free and tastes great. (Poking fun at myself, not at support groups--just to be clear)

  8. #57

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    Hi, just checking in. I've never played this tune and if it were thrown at me at a jam I'd probably do something off the cuff along these lines and get forcibly removed from the club. It ain't pretty. Yes, I'm referencing All Blues at the beginning By the way, Wayne is blowing penta blues all over this on his original recording, so no way I'm playing this live on a subdued archtop next to a wailing saxomaniac (or playing an extended blues solo here).

    Please continue.


  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronstuff
    Here I go! I LOVE Wayne Shorter's music and several of my original tunes reflect that! I had listened to Night Dreamer, but never played it... His tunes have such character and mood, I find they encourage improvisors to go beyond their usual devices.
    This was recorded at a theater rehearsal studio with a bass player, and the Drum Genius app.

    I enjoyed this take which, curiously, is quite a departure from the original.

  10. #59

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    Peter, fun take. Fantastic tone too. As I always, I love your "let's see what happens" attitude and envy your "let's see what happens" playing-- cuz its good!

  11. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by PickingMyEars
    Reg, I do miss the conversations we had in the past that weren't just about scales and harmony. Like, when we had that whole thread going about phrasing in comping and phrasing in single line playing. That and time feel and rhythmic ideas. I know that stuff is harder to put words to without the visual of sheet music and such, just miss that talk as it's oft over looked. Scale and harmony are vital, but without rhythm, groove, and feel--they are just a page out of a music textbook. Give me a key based riff played with pocket, feel, and rhythm over the most complex sub's any day. At the end of the day, for me, it's all about that pocket and being intentional with the "simplest" of nuances in your playing--even if that's basic changes. I'm still not there, but that's my goal. Make the music feel good.

    This is coming from the same person who would OBSESS over ear training back in the day. I still work on my ears, but I view ear training as more holistic. A note fades away without intentional rhythm. I think Chris'77 said it before. The rhythms are king. The rhythms dictate how the note sounds. How does that quote go by Dizzy "I hear rhythms in my head and find notes to hang on those rhythms..." I think I misquoted a little, it's a paraphrase then I thought being intentional with my note choice was the end all be all, and that rhythmic clarity would be easy... WOW, was I wrong. Rhythmic intentionality is the final frontier and the study of rhythm runs DEEP.

    If you don't know who this is, look at the name under my Sound Cloud posts. No hiding it there

    Okay, off my soap box. I think I still kept this post shorter than the usual essays that I used to post in the past. I'm improving, I promise. I checked into Internet Forum Members Anonymous (IFMA) and feeling better already. Plus, the coffee is free and tastes great. (Poking fun at myself, not at support groups--just to be clear)
    I agree with all of this. I highly recommend Reg's youtube videos. He plays every note and chord with a terrific time feel. Just imitate that.

  12. #61

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    The first one I did (deleted) had no blues in it because I thought there wasn't much point in playing a completely non-bluesy tune and then banging out Gm pentatonic over it. But nobody liked it so I gave in.

    The one lick that has stolen the show for me so far is by Hep. Check out his vid at 0.27. But start it from the beginning otherwise it's not a surprise. Perfectly judged. Sends shivers down your spine :-)


  13. #62

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    I agree with those describing this as a puzzle. Once you get it the improv comes a little more naturally. Nice suggestion Mr. B.

    Last edited by Marshall535; 02-20-2021 at 11:47 PM. Reason: balanced the volume

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshall535
    I agree with those describing this as a puzzle. Once you get it the improv comes a little more naturally. Nice suggestion Mr. B.

    Yeah! That stuff right before 2 minutes...thats how you build on that bridge.

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by PickingMyEars
    This is coming from the same person who would OBSESS over ear training back in the day. I still work on my ears, but I view ear training as more holistic. A note fades away without intentional rhythm. I think Chris'77 said it before. The rhythms are king. The rhythms dictate how the note sounds. How does that quote go by Dizzy "I hear rhythms in my head and find notes to hang on those rhythms..." I think I misquoted a little, it's a paraphrase then I thought being intentional with my note choice was the end all be all, and that rhythmic clarity would be easy... WOW, was I wrong. Rhythmic intentionality is the final frontier and the study of rhythm runs DEEP.
    the mistake was to assume 'ear training' only relates to the audiation of pitch.

    EDIT: actually, no the problem, is more this. There's a divide.

    Audiation = the aural imagination in action. Hearing the music
    Ear training = the categorisation of sounds (most often pitches) by ear

    The first thing is actually WAY more important. Ear training - the ability to dictate notes to paper, is a reductionist activity ('I hear C#!', 'I hear eighth, quarter, eighth', 'I hear a sax section in four way close') which is a useful skill for a professional musician, but you have to hear it first.

    Audiation on the other hand is a holistic thing. You imagine the phrase with all its nuance. Rhythm is part of that. It is the specific trait that makes someone a musician.

    Gross rhythm can be what you might call 'syntactic' - for example, I can write down a Parker solo as a bunch of eight notes and so on, but what is going on with feel, accentuation, beat placement etc is a lot deeper.

    Which of course is the real value of learning solos, not simply writing them down as an assignment for class... And why I would always prioritise deep listening over ear training. Tristano understood this implicitly, for example.

    The side of it that people think is important - the playing of notes on the instrument, writing them down etc - is easily achievable if you have clear enough audiation, and enough time to practice. It's an easily quantifiable practice activity.

    Also, I hate the way many ear training approaches (not Banacos necessarily) focus on individual pitches, not phrases and other gestalts.

    And in jazz, I would say rhythmic audition is first in the order of importance. Usually pitches are pretty easy to work out once the rhythm is understood, as many jazz devices (bop scales, enclosure lines etc etc) are pitched manifestations of rhythmic devices.
    Last edited by christianm77; 02-21-2021 at 08:33 AM.

  16. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    The first one I did (deleted) had no blues in it because I thought there wasn't much point in playing a completely non-bluesy tune and then banging out Gm pentatonic over it. But nobody liked it so I gave in.

    The one lick that has stolen the show for me so far is by Hep. Check out his vid at 0.27. But start it from the beginning otherwise it's not a surprise. Perfectly judged. Sends shivers down your spine :-)

    Yay, thanks! It's my go to lick on ii-V, only here it sounds weird because it's contrasting enough with the bluesy in G stuff. My fingers played it as soon as I saw the change, without thinking. Dunno if it's good thing or not

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    Hi, just checking in. I've never played this tune and if it were thrown at me at a jam I'd probably do something off the cuff along these lines and get forcibly removed from the club. It ain't pretty. Yes, I'm referencing All Blues at the beginning By the way, Wayne is blowing penta blues all over this on his original recording, so no way I'm playing this live on a subdued archtop next to a wailing saxomaniac (or playing an extended blues solo here).

    Please continue.

    Yes, thank you for choosing this tone! IMHO these kind of tunes more suited for blues/rock gtr sound than trad archtop. Sounds lively and fresh.

  18. #67

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    Anyway, enough typing form me, here's my attempt. I found that Pickinmyears's linked backing was a bit 'out', fun, but I wanted something more vanilla for learning the tune, so I recorded my own comping after the solo (to make sure I was playing the form right etc)

    I find that E7sus4 a bit of a ****, there's some funny moments with that lol



    Learned it now, I think. Thanks for the call Jeff.
    Last edited by christianm77; 02-21-2021 at 10:57 AM.

  19. #68

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    Since it's my home turf I decided to stick with a bluesy approach:



    Comments welcome...

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive
    Dunno if it's good thing or not
    Oh, definitely good! I liked it because it came out of nowhere, was supremely jazzy, and suited the tune beautifully.

  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO
    Since it's my home turf I decided to stick with a bluesy approach:



    Comments welcome...
    Sounds good. Clearly working in your comfort zone, all that bluesy stuff sounds very natural and unforced.

    Light bulb moment for me...you play just 2 chords on the intro, and it sounds great. Could be a fun way for me to get away from just playing the blues in the A section, I can outline the Gmaj and Eb maj sounds.

  22. #71

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    Also Christian, I liked your laid back take. And yeah, those sus chords are a beeyatch!

    I maintain the reason is you want to play "notey-er" over them, as they're a great spot to build tension...but only a few notes actually sound strong on them. So you have to be very conscious of where you land.

  23. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    Sounds good. Clearly working in your comfort zone, all that bluesy stuff sounds very natural and unforced.

    Light bulb moment for me...you play just 2 chords on the intro, and it sounds great. Could be a fun way for me to get away from just playing the blues in the A section, I can outline the Gmaj and Eb maj sounds.
    Thanks Jeff. The Gmj7/Ebmj7 approach was something I tried but it didn't work for me the way I wanted.

  24. #73

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    Jeff, your reactions to my posts put a smile on my face! I was just "thinking aloud" about what I'd honestly do if the jam leader pointed in my direction, then I pressed record on the phone.

    I kind of agree that this (the A section) sounds like "Wayne's version of All Blues". In the B section the E7sus4 looks a lot like Dbm7 which, after Ebm7 Ab7 hints at a descending II-V, so, what the hell, let's go to the sus4 then raise it a half-step! Fusion! Anyway, that's how it sounds to me, with a legato approach over those two chords.
    Last edited by Peter C; 02-23-2021 at 06:32 AM.

  25. #74

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    Very laid back and relaxed, ragman - I like that.

  26. #75

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    As Chris'77 suggested, go back to the original recording to get some ideas for that Esus7 to Fsus7 section at the "bridge".

    First chorus of Wayne's solo, he directly references the melody of his tune--I mean, he wrote it so fair game

    Second chorus is where he starts with an idea we can steal

    Low A next octave A to E... Someone has to convince Dirk Lauken's to code in some sheet music functionality to JGF, we are a music forum

    Next chorus high E C# B. Hints at some sort of A major sound going to Bb major. Wayne's solo is easy to get stuck in your head, and it's possible to sing most of it... You could say that about many of his solos. Finding the simple in the complex... Wayne shorter is a melodic harmonic rhythmic genius.

    That's the last bit of theory as it relates to harmony and scales that I'll post it a while. I want to challenge myself to think of the other details. Plus other people here on JGF talk about the theory far better than I could.

    Agreed that distorted guitar fits the tune very well. Really enjoying these takes, love how we all approach the same tune a little differently. Reveals what we listen to and what we prioritize as we share our solos. And for those of us that post with video... TOMMO, I am totally envious of your living room space. Does that Robert Johnson poster intimidate you or inspire you? In my office, I have a huge B&W poster of Wes Montgomery posing with his guitar. He's smiling, but that stare ain't always so friendly. It's as if he is telling me "you gotta make it groove and pop, or you ain't gonna be playing anything at all!"

    This is the poster I see every time I sit down to practice:



    And... Wayne Shorter's first album as a leader... as far as I know:

    Last edited by PickingMyEars; 02-21-2021 at 06:47 PM.

  27. #76

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    Had to take another pass at it...

    I'm liking both F#m/Gm pent over the sus chords AND C#m/Dm.
    Oh the places you'll go.


  28. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    Had to take another pass at it...

    I'm liking both F#m/Gm pent over the sus chords AND C#m/Dm.
    Oh the places you'll go.
    I like the way you're building that up, nice feel, gaining intensity. At around 0:18 you're hitting an E (G dorian) which I don't hear over F7. C dorian would have the Eb...

  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    I like the way you're building that up, nice feel, gaining intensity. At around 0:18 you're hitting an E (G dorian) which I don't hear over F7. C dorian would have the Eb...
    All reflexes there. I've never thought about a mode in my life...and probably never played a minor pentatonic where I didn't add a 6th and a 9th. Old blues habits die hard

  30. #79

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    Don't think the E7sus/F7sus is the only obstacle. There's also the Ebm/Ab7 which may look straightforward but isn't.

    In Shorter's original, the Ebm/Ab7 is actually Bbm. Try it and see.

    The two sus chords are A/F#m and Bb/Gm in the melody and D/Bm and Bb/Gm in the solo.

    (The melody over the E7sus looks like E/C#m but it's not).

  31. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by PickingMyEars
    TOMMO, I am totally envious of your living room space. Does that Robert Johnson poster intimidate you or inspire you? In my office, I have a huge B&W poster of Wes Montgomery posing with his guitar. He's smiling, but that stare ain't always so friendly. It's as if he is telling me "you gotta make it groove and pop, or you ain't gonna be playing anything at all!"
    It's more inspriring than intimidating. R.J.'s music keeps inspiring me after all the years I've been listening to it and try to play it. And so should W.M.'s poster in your office.

  32. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    Had to take another pass at it...

    I'm liking both F#m/Gm pent over the sus chords AND C#m/Dm.
    Oh the places you'll go.

    Superb, Jeff!

    As for the sus chords: I may have been misled in a good way because I've been working from a chord sheet that specifies Bm and Cm harmony and I went from there.

  33. #82

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    My practice room has only heard jazz played, but the posters are Tom Waits, Toots and the Maytals and (prior to an incident) Elvis Costello. Got them from record stores throwing away the window displays many years ago.

    I've really appreciated the discussion about how people approach this tune. Thanks to all.

  34. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO
    As for the sus chords: I may have been misled in a good way because I've been working from a chord sheet that specifies Bm and Cm harmony and I went from there.

    NB: This isn't 'theory', this is just communication!


    If it was an E7 you'd still play Bm because it's the ii. The Bm pent has the A in it which is the sus note of E7sus. If you treat the E7sus as a Bm11 chord, you can sub F#m pent.

    You just liked my post above (#81). Shorter does different things in the solo than the head.

    To get a sus sound with pentatonics:

    Over a minor chord, play from the 5th - i.e. A minor pent over Dm. (Wes used that a lot).

    Over a dom7, play from a tone above - i.e. A minor pent over G7.

    The best way to get this is to play it because it's the sound that matters, not all the boring explanations.



    That's why they do Bbm over the Ebm-Ab7 in Night Dreamer, because it gives the sus sound. And then F#m (5th of Bm) and Gm for the two sus chords.

    I'm not laying down the law. There are always other ways of doing things.

  35. #84

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    Good info. I wasn't aware of the rule, but my ears sure agree.

    Re: practice rooms....ah yes...I had one once. Pre children. Now it's just the kitchen table with my kids' e-learning stuff stacked in a corner behind me, in front of my little cabiet shutters that I measured the spaces for about 50 times before I cut them, and they still don't close properly. Cabinet maker, I'm not.

  36. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    Don't think the E7sus/F7sus is the only obstacle. There's also the Ebm/Ab7 which may look straightforward but isn't.

    In Shorter's original, the Ebm/Ab7 is actually Bbm. Try it and see.

    The two sus chords are A/F#m and Bb/Gm in the melody and D/Bm and Bb/Gm in the solo.

    (The melody over the E7sus looks like E/C#m but it's not).
    I'm hearing Ebm9 Ab13b9 in the piano

  37. #86

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    Ragman: I'm aware of what you said in your post re: sus4 chords/sounds - I think I just meant to say that I didn't have to suss out* what to play there because I was just playing over Bm and Cm.



    * pun intended....




    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    Over a dom7, play from a tone above - i.e. A minor pent over G7.
    ...or play a major triad from a tone below?

  38. #87

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    Wayne and Lee Morgan seem to favour an Ebm pent/dorian sound on the Ebm7 Ab7. Not sure what ragman is referring to...
    Last edited by christianm77; 02-22-2021 at 11:35 AM.

  39. #88

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO
    ...or play a major triad from a tone below?
    Yes, more or less the same thing but more limited. An F triad wouldn't have the E or G in it.

  40. #89

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    if you think about II V progession -the V is not altered...play notes without alteration.
    Ebm7----Bbm penta
    Ab7---- Ebm penta,Bbm penta


    ps.
    on a static V - I usualy play melodic min scale 5 up....if you do not like minor penta.

  41. #90

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    Christian -

    I'm hearing Ebm9 Ab13b9 in the piano
    So the piano man embellished it. It's called jazz. It's what they do, you know :-)

    Sax solo transcription in A -

    Shorter - Night Dreamer sheet music for tenor saxophone solo (transcription)

    Notes played over Fm/Bb7:

    Head: Bb C Ab C

    Solo: Eb C Ab G F Bb

    That's from Cm (not an Fm. Same scale, different usage):

    C D Eb F G Ab Bb

    So Bbm in G.

    Anyway, I don't actually care what they played, I'm only concerned with what works. An outlined Ebm sounds tame, Bbm sounds right in context.

  42. #91

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    But the real point is what we do with it, not what Shorter did. If it sounds nice, it is.

  43. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    This is what I hear first chorus solo

    Eb Bb Gb F F Eb Bb

    EDIT: the transcription has it the same.

    Nice diatonic Eb Dorian phrase ending up on the Bb7 root. Couldn't be more obvious or songlike really. Easy one to hear.

    Second time
    Ab Bb Eb Gb Eb F
    Again, Eb Dorian with a strong pentatonic influence.

    I also love the way he starts his solo on the 4th 'Avoid' note on G major lol, and then resolutely ignores the G major chord for most of his solo, playing G minor pentatonic.

    Wayne tells you how to play these tunes. It's not the only solution, but it's usually best in my experience to listen to him first.

  44. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    But the real point is what we do with it, not what Shorter did. If it sounds nice, it is.
    Bb minor pentatonic is quite a Wes choice on Eb minor

  45. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by kris
    if you think about II V progession -the V is not altered...play notes without alteration.
    Ebm7----Bbm penta
    Ab7---- Ebm penta,Bbm penta


    ps.
    on a static V - I usualy play melodic min scale 5 up....if you do not like minor penta.
    As a sidebar, I might live to regret making this big of a statement, but, I have no compelling evidence from my listening yet to suggest that Wayne in this era was using melodic minor mode harmony. I hear, modes, pentatonic (A LOT), half-whole and whole tone, but not melodic minor.

    As for his writing, there's a bit of a difference as to how his charts get interpreted by different pianists.

    Dim scale seems like a big thing at this point actually.

    He often writes 7 chords we would expect as 7#11 as 7b5 in his own charts. Which suggests he was thinking of these chords as pretty much the same thing, something that would come from more diminished scale thinking. A good example is Deluge where McCoy plays a diminished scale thing in thirds on the IV7#11 chord.

    On this song, McCoy often plays Ab13b9. The soloists seem mostly to use diatonic choices.

  46. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Bb minor pentatonic is quite a Wes choice on Eb minor
    I know, I said that in #85.

    ' i.e. A minor pent over Dm. (Wes used that a lot)'

  47. #96

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    People can play whatever they like!

    I'm quite interested to know what my favourite musicians played though. Maybe it's just me. *shrugs*

  48. #97

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    And it's only Monday

    It might be time to start messing up knicker's dream...


  49. #98

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    My thought to post these jams before the weekend is working out I wanted to give people a reason to participate early--and keep it fresh.

    I'm ready for Nica, but I'll hold off til Thursday. I can tell you that in my opinion, Nica is TOUGH. Gonna be a while before I feel like hitting that red button and capturing my playing

  50. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    My thought to post these jams before the weekend is working out I wanted to give people a reason to participate early--and keep it fresh.

    I'm ready for Nica, but I'll hold off til Thursday. I can tell you that in my opinion, Nica is TOUGH. Gonna be a while before I feel like hitting that red button and capturing my playing
    It's also a tune that is surprising in the acoustic format. Joe Pass did it with the "For Django" crew on this album Appassionato, which is one of may favorites of his. Loaded with wonderful tunes, performed with a lot of energy, and all acoustic. I think Joe plays an Epiphone that belonged to John Pisano's dad on that album.

  51. #100

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    My thought to post these jams before the weekend is working out I wanted to give people a reason to participate early--and keep it fresh.

    I'm ready for Nica, but I'll hold off til Thursday. I can tell you that in my opinion, Nica is TOUGH. Gonna be a while before I feel like hitting that red button and capturing my playing
    'Xactly :-)