Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Any suggestions are welcome.

    Thanks.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    Here's a free article:

    9 Triad Pairs That Sound Great | You'll Hear It

    I like them all and especially the pair he recommends over C7 : C+ and Gb

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mrblues
    Any suggestions are welcome.

    Thanks.
    Can you elaborate?

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Thanks rintincop, thats a good article for start!

    Well Christian I am looking for a guitar centered book, which focuses on improvising only with triads. Thats it.

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mrblues
    Thanks rintincop, thats a good article for start!

    Well Christian I am looking for a guitar centered book, which focuses on improvising only with triads. Thats it.
    Do you mean triad pairs or using triads and their extensions?

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mrblues
    Thanks rintincop, thats a good article for start!

    Well Christian I am looking for a guitar centered book, which focuses on improvising only with triads. Thats it.
    Ah I see.

    Well TBH I’m not entirely sure if such a book exists. Maybe I will write one! Any ideas?

    Triads are very natural to the guitar. You can use them in root position or as upper extension structures.

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    There's several books that address triad pairs Walt Weiskopf, Gary Campbell, Jerry Bergonzi first to come to mind.

    George Garzone has a DVD that develops an approach
    connecting random triads

    forum member Jordan Klemons has a teaching group that addresses harmony in a triad + 1 (quadrad) mentality.

    Mick Goodrick and Tim Miller have a book that explores the 10 possible pairs of 3 note structures derived from a hexatonic 6 of 7 scale collection.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    There’s basically not one book that does it all.

    i really like Jordan’s approach btw

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    I think a lot of the stuff out there I find a bit dry. Respect to Goodrick, but it always felt like an exercise working through his stuff.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Bobby Stern who posts here has a book called Tradicisms ..it explores triad movement in half..whole..minor and major third and chromatic intervals..all in single note format..Major and minor chords..ascending and descending..

    as Stern is not a guitarist but a sax player..your melodic lines develop quickly and you begin to hear fragments of melodies and harmonic/melodic movement from many tunes that use common triads in them

    after you go through several exercises you begin to connect chords of all types and directions..

    those who may think they know triads well may be surprised with this type of approach
    Last edited by wolflen; 04-06-2020 at 05:31 PM.

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Jerry Bergonzi's melodic structures is based on 1235 and 1345 patterns. They are triads + 1. He shows how to use them both in root position and as extensions over basic changes, including all permutations and inversions.

    The thing is 4 note inversions are complicated structures. Another alternative is to work on guide tones and see triads as guide tones + 1 as a starting point. Build up from there (different fingerings, string groups, inversions, other superimpositions over the harmony)

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    We are working on one right now. See the stickied thread(s) Up top of this forum.

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    I’m shocked that nobody has mentioned Garrison Fewell’s book yet.
    Sorry! Something went wrong!

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02
    I’m shocked that nobody has mentioned Garrison Fewell’s book yet.
    Sorry! Something went wrong!
    Yeah, that's the book OP is looking for.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02
    I’m shocked that nobody has mentioned Garrison Fewell’s book yet.
    Sorry! Something went wrong!
    Good call but Bahnzo above mentioned the study group on this book plus I would've but I'm not sure if the OP meant triads and extensions or working with triad pairs...

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    I am interested in both traid pairs and triads and extensions also. So I need a book (if that exists) which inlude both. And everything what you can do with triads during improvisation.

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mrblues
    I am interested in both traid pairs and triads and extensions also. So I need a book (if that exists) which inlude both. And everything what you can do with triads during improvisation.
    I don't think anyone has written that book yet. It's the next low hanging fruit publication for the lucky author.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Actually I believe you should study triads - not only in concern of soloing... but first of all their possible application - soloing ideas come up more natural then..

    I saw triad material in Randy Vincent "3-note voicing and beyond' and in some chapters of Steve Kahn's method - in very elaborated and guitaristic way... Mick Goodrick partly covers that too.. I think there are lots of methods that do that

    Actually you can elaborate it yourself...

    master voicings of close and open triads and inversions (major, minor, dim, aug) on 1-4 strings, 2-5 strings, 3-6 strings... it is not a crazy task to do...

    Then just
    1) apply to different bass/functions
    2) combine them in different ways

    While you are looking for method it can be a good point to start from

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Not to beat a dead horse, but there is literally a study group on this EXACT topic following Garrison Fewell’s book on this forum.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mrblues
    I am interested in both traid pairs and triads and extensions also. So I need a book (if that exists) which inlude both. And everything what you can do with triads during improvisation.
    https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Improvis.../dp/0634017721

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    If you want to learn George Garzone's triadic approach on guitar, get in touch with Chris Crocco!

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Thanks guys! Gonna look forward to what you all suggested.