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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by buduranus2
    Well, to me, blues is a particular resonance, a certain tonality or sonority that's immediately identifiable. Like the difference between Lee Morgan and Shorty Rogers. So, for me, even if the structure isn't a blues, my playing is still informed by the blues. The blues has its own "emotional logic." John McLaughlin doesn't have it but Kenny Burrell unquestionably does. The blues has certain linguistic elements that we recognize even if we can't articulate them in words. The difference between being "correct" and being "right." We can learn to speak a foreign language "correctly" but to a native speaker it isn't "right." I'd say that blues lines are the strongest and if we use those as a foundation and embellish them with the harmonic elements of jazz we're in the game. That's my recipe FWIW.
    that’s a brilliant way of putting it.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by greveost
    LOL, by coincidence, I just happened to jam on Miss jones as well the other day Hope you don't mind me posting, btw, if you want me to remove it, I can do it.

    Playing my (very inexpensive) Harley Benton hb 35

    I enjoyed your playing quite a bit. Gives me something to shoot for!

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    Observations...

    Overall, you're totally on the right track

    You play the head stiff and on top of the beat/almost ahead? Then when you solo, you totally relax and groove.

    You mine the same territory over the A a bit too much...I think you handle the bridge quite well,but after, instead of heading somewhere new, you go back.

    Overall I enjoyed your playing, good groove, nice tone, good phrasing. I look forward to hearing more.
    All good observations Jeff and I appreciate your taking the time to listen so closely. Yeah, I think I'm on the right track as you said. I feel like I've cracked the code, which was the goal when I started to learn this style three years ago. But, as you pointed out, it's kind of repetitive as I've noted in previous replies. Appreciate your perspectives and encouragement!

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by buduranus2
    I enjoyed your playing quite a bit. Gives me something to shoot for!


    All good observations Jeff and I appreciate your taking the time to listen so closely. Yeah, I think I'm on the right track as you said. I feel like I've cracked the code, which was the goal when I started to learn this style three years ago. But, as you pointed out, it's kind of repetitive as I've noted in previous replies. Appreciate your perspectives and encouragement!
    Thanks man, yeah there is always room for improvements for all of us, that is one of many beautiful aspects of music!

  5. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by greveost
    Thanks man, yeah there is always room for improvements for all of us, that is one of many beautiful aspects of music!
    I had a meaningful breakthrough today. I closed the book and played from memory. Changed my perspective entirely. Hacked around on a few "ideas" and it felt much more organic, like I'm more connected to the feeling of the tune instead of the idea of it.

  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by buduranus2
    I had a meaningful breakthrough today. I closed the book and played from memory. Changed my perspective entirely. Hacked around on a few "ideas" and it felt much more organic, like I'm more connected to the feeling of the tune instead of the idea of it.
    That's great!

    Relying on the book only can be very limiting.

    Playing from memory changes the perspective as you pointed out.

    Awesome!

  7. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by buduranus2
    I had a meaningful breakthrough today. I closed the book and played from memory. Changed my perspective entirely. Hacked around on a few "ideas" and it felt much more organic, like I'm more connected to the feeling of the tune instead of the idea of it.
    Wow. Good god, if I'd known you were doing it from a book...

    It's an old principle, get it off the page as soon as possible, then it becomes your own, you can really hear/see what you're doing. Also, the subconscious works quicker so you can look ahead... and all that. As you say, organic. "It's the only way!"

  8. #57

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    The quickest way to get it off the page, as well as actually doing it physically, is to keep playing it in your head. Imagine the chords and the tune, both. A few repetitions and it'll gradually take root. Train the brain...

    Mind you, with me, if I don't need to remember it, it can fade pretty quickly too. But it's generally good while it lasts

  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    The quickest way to get it off the page, as well as actually doing it physically, is to keep playing it in your head. Imagine the chords and the tune, both. A few repetitions and it'll gradually take root. Train the brain...

    Mind you, with me, if I don't need to remember it, it can fade pretty quickly too. But it's generally good while it lasts
    Which reminds me of that great country song: "I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once as I ever was!"