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  1. #51

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    Sorry, I've been very busy these days.

    Meet Google Drive – One place for all your files

    Here is basic breakdown of TWNBAY in Harmonic regions.
    So, on Root position in song (R) you can play both harmonically and melodically any chord that belongs to Root harmonic region. And same for Dominant and Subdominant.
    Some of these subs are common knowledge and some are unique that George picked up through his career. Peter compiled it into manageable resource.
    So, its great on 251's, on songs on anything. Harmonic regions are very usable in fast tempo soloing because colours that they provides are easier to hear on fast tempo and they are easy to play. But, in order to make this work we must use what George and Peter calls "pure" lines. There are many examples of those lines in Peters videos.

    Secret of 2 chords are great for neck visualisation. Everything in this method is based on this visualisation.
    Edit: In S2C in first step we have basic chord and its parallel like Cmaj7 and Am7. In next step we add dominants to these chords G7 and E7. Third step is adding 2514 based on b2 of the Dominant chord. Why are we doing this? We want to be able to insert dominant on every chord of the song. This produces what Peter calls Flux and Reflux, waiving in and out.
    Matrix from S2C can and should be combined with Harmonic regions. They are just devices for easier understanding your harmonic position in a song. There are other devices. We didn't even touch inserting of Harmonic and Melodic minor, Dominant Diminished etc into harmony. They bring more colours.
    Last edited by mikostep; 03-03-2020 at 04:47 AM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Miko, many thanks for sending me the material. I understand everyhting exceot step 3 which I am about 80% there i am sttruggling with the 2514 and the b2 (b9) subs for example in key of C maj dmin G7 C maj and Fmaj are Dmin7 now is Eb-7 G7 is Ab7 C maj is Db maj and Fmaj is Gb major?

    I appreciate your time and want to say many thanks have a good day. Best Sibbs

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sibbo01
    Miko, many thanks for sending me the material. I understand everyhting exceot step 3 which I am about 80% there i am sttruggling with the 2514 and the b2 (b9) subs for example in key of C maj dmin G7 C maj and Fmaj are Dmin7 now is Eb-7 G7 is Ab7 C maj is Db maj and Fmaj is Gb major?

    I appreciate your time and want to say many thanks have a good day. Best Sibbs
    Step 1 - relatives

    1. Fmaj and Dm

    2. Cmaj (actuall key) and Am.

    Step 2 - dominants

    1. Cmaj-G7 and Am-E7

    2. Fmaj-C7 and Dm-A7

    Step 3 - further development of dominants

    1.G7 - Abm7, Db7, Gbmaj, Bmaj

    2. E7 - Fm7, Bb7, Ebmaj, Abmaj

    3. C7 - Dbm7, Gb7, Bmaj, Emaj

    4. A7 - Bbm7, Eb7, Abmaj, Dbmaj

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sibbo01
    Miko, many thanks for sending me the material. I understand everyhting exceot step 3 which I am about 80% there i am sttruggling with the 2514 and the b2 (b9) subs for example in key of C maj dmin G7 C maj and Fmaj are Dmin7 now is Eb-7 G7 is Ab7 C maj is Db maj and Fmaj is Gb major?

    I appreciate your time and want to say many thanks have a good day. Best Sibbs
    Yes, the 2-5-1-4 thing is confusing. I think I see it like this: let's take the key of C : so G7 is the plain Dom7, where Db7 is the TT dom 7. We can always add the related ii to any V, so in this case, Abm7 precedes the Db7. So already we have the 2 - 5 of the TT of the original resolving (or implied) key centre - ie - Abm7, Db7. From here, I'm supposing that the idea is that we could infer other chords from the 2- 5 of the TT, basically extending it to the 1 and 4. In other words, the Tonic, Sub Dom and Dom of the key a TT away from the original key.

    Gb Ab Bb Cb Db Eb F

    Problem is that the I and IV chord of the of Gb major contain the Gb (F#), which is the hardest note to control against the G7

    Maybe the thinking should be that the tensional flux is just the side stepping down a semitone (from G7 for Gb maj) then resolving back, but to use chords and arps from the TT key instead of scale type runs to make it more interesting?

    Then again, I could be way off base! ... still, all very interesting stuff, which I've yet to try out properly...

    * EDIT - I fixed my mistakes...
    Last edited by princeplanet; 03-04-2020 at 06:56 AM.

  6. #55

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    Conceptually, it is easy.
    1. original 2514 and 6
    2. add V7 for 2, 4 and 6, 5 is already V7 of 1.
    3. tritone V7s from step 2 for another set of V7s
    4. make new 2514s based on V7s gotten in step 3.

    Does it work? I do not know, I did not follow Farrell's demonstration.

    Why doesn't he add V7 of5?

    Sent from My Blog Page

  7. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by princeplanet
    Yes, the 2-5-1-4 thing is confusing. I think I see it like this: let's take the key of C : so G7 is the plain Dom7, where Db7 is the TT dom 7. We can always add the related ii to any V, so in this case, Abm7 precedes the Db7. So already we have the 2 - 5 of the bR of the original resolving (or implied) key centre - ie - Abm7, Db7. From here, I'm supposing that the idea is that we could infer other chords from the 2- 5 of the bR, basically extending it to the 1 and 4. In other words, the Tonic, Sub Dom and Dom of the key a semitone below the original key.

    But this is where it breaks from traditional TT sub thinking- because B maj : B C# D# E F# G# A# has no F, so it doesn't contain the inverted 3 and 7 that we get from the usual TT sub. Maybe the thinking should be that the tensional flux is just the side stepping down a semitone then resolving back, but to use chords and arps from the bR key instead of scale type runs to make it more interesting?

    Then again, I could be way off base! ... still, all very interesting stuff, which I've yet to try out properly...
    Approved! George Benson method, Peter Farrell

    1. Flux - Dm7, Fmaj7, Cmaj7, Am7
    2. Reflux (inserting dominants, or how you called it tensional flux) - A7, C7, G7, E7 and their 2516 chain starting half step above those dominants.
    George is obviously not taking TT sub rigidly because TT is just a colour and he expanded it further.
    And its all about flux and reflux here, waiving in and out. We should be able to feel it and do it on all chords of the song.

    OTOH, Harmonic regions are about understanding the harmony. There are 3 regions: Root, SubDominant and Dominant region. Just like in blues (it looks like most of the songs are some kind of extended blues).
    In TWNBAY analysis I posted previously, I underlined those regions. Try to sub those chords with chords from Harmonic regions post. But, remember, Subdominant and Dominant regions are interchangeable. So, if the song is in Cmaj7, when you see Fmaj7 (SD) you can play G7 lines (D) but also Fm7 or Bb7 (SDminor) etc.
    Sometimes some lines do not work, so just experiment.

  8. #57

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    Please re visit my post where I changed (edited) the explanation regarding the TT key in relation to the original root key. I was confusing the relationship to the 5th , for the relationship to the root.... or something...

  9. #58

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    I got jazzy reflux

  10. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by princeplanet
    Please re visit my post where I changed (edited) the explanation regarding the TT key in relation to the original root key. I was confusing the relationship to the 5th , for the relationship to the root.... or something...
    Again, it is just another colour, a beautiful one actually. That same note is b7 in IIm of the TT too.

  11. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    Having watched some of his youtube channel video lessons lately, he seems to be a superb teacher, both in material and the way he communicates and plays it. And being somewhat familiar with Bensons concepts myself, since i studied with Ritchie Hart who plays that stuff, he really has it down!
    I studied with Richie for a bit as well. He's a monster player in that Wes Montgomery/George Benson style. He should be more well known.

  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikostep
    Yes, it was a typo. I meant Bmaj. I've corrected it.
    You also have a typo in in Abmin7, its notes are Ab, B, Eb, Gb.
    Important thing to stress here is that GB likes to play arpeggios, so these pitch collections are strong if used like that and you can see/hear them as different colors.
    Here in this video Peter explains this and plays many examples. He shows some other examples but not in depth as he shows on his classes.



    Regarding neck visualisation Cmaj-Amin creates 5 positions. They are different than CAGED and Cmaj-Amin is much easier to remember. I'll post basic lines for each position later with correct fingerings and picking.
    A bunch of Peter's vids have gone private - bummer, had not finished watching them. @mikostep, any info on that?
    Thanks
    SJ

  13. #62

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  14. #63

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  15. #64

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    Looks like he did some restructuring of his YouTube channel too. At the time of my last post to this thread, there were only about four vids there; now there are too many to count!

    I look forward to checking out his interesting ideas some more! Thanks again, @mikostep, for turning us on to him. Interesting stuff.

  16. #65

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    Hi, I agree with the other GB Peter Farrell fans. Try Instagram allow the videos tend to be short. I have sent a request to Peter to join his group, there are about 12 others and he has allowed me to join, i suggest you give that a try. Also Miko is a pupil and has been extremly helpful when I have had a problem previously. Best Sibbs

  17. #66

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    It looks exactly like CAGED relative major or minor makes no difference.

  18. #67

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    First of all thank you for your explanations concerning the method Miko!

    All great stuff. I'm from Brazil and been following Peter's work for a while, great guy and musician.

    The matrix of major and minor chords without the avoid notes are very interesting. They suit well in major and relative minor tonalities, but I've been wondering after watching Peter's video with melodic minor augmented arpeggio: using the matrix concept on a minor melodic (or even a harmonic minor for that matter), one can/would adjust the matrix raising the 7th of the minor and the 5th of the major?

    This way the chords in this new melodic minor matrix would be for instance Cmaj7(#5) and Am(maj7). Or for these two minor scales (melodic and harmonic), Peter uses just the plain scale with all the notes without thinking in the secret of two chords?
    Last edited by lopesco; 05-31-2020 at 02:12 PM. Reason: Typo

  19. #68

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    Cmaj7(#5) is the III MODE of Am(maj7) which is the parent scale. Every thing is interchangeable in melodic minor. That’s it’s big advantage. It’s simply all the same shape as major but with a b3. The modes yield very different chord scales though.
    Last edited by rintincop; 05-31-2020 at 07:51 PM.

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by rintincop
    e Cmaj7(#5) is the III MODE of Am(maj7) which is the parent scale. Every thing is interchangeable in melodic minor. That’s it’s big advantage. It’s simply all the same shape as major but with a b3. The modes yield very different chord scales though.
    Yes, for sure. But I'm wondering about specific fingerings for MM and HM concerning the GB Method. In the major/minor matrix we have 2nps shapes bringing a maj7(with added 6 and 9), and a relative minor 7(9,11) on 5 diferent positions across the neck based on these 2 chords.

  21. #70

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    It's all the same fingering as major scale on the piano. That's one of the benefits of the melodic minor thing.

  22. #71

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    Is Step 3 called the "matrix" or are Steps 1-3 altogether called the "matrix"?

    matrix: an environment or material in which something develops; a surrounding medium or structure.
    in math "a rectangular array of quantities or expressions in rows and columns that is treated as a single entity and manipulated according to particular rules."
    synonym: network

    It all make s perfect sense to me and is highly useable, thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikostep
    Step 1 - relatives

    1. Fmaj and Dm

    2. Cmaj (actuall key) and Am.

    Step 2 - dominants

    1. Cmaj-G7 and Am-E7

    2. Fmaj-C7 and Dm-A7

    Step 3 - further development of dominants

    1.G7 - Abm7, Db7, Gbmaj, Bmaj

    2. E7 - Fm7, Bb7, Ebmaj, Abmaj

    3. C7 - Dbm7, Gb7, Bmaj, Emaj

    4. A7 - Bbm7, Eb7, Abmaj, Dbmaj

  23. #72

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    This part you are refering to are the harmonic regions used for substitutions over a given harmony. The matrix is a pattern of 5 fingerings used as a reference point to the scales (major in this case) over the guitar neck. Peter, here cited by Miko, gives an example based on the major scale. You can see it here:

    Quote Originally Posted by mikostep
    Here are 5 positions of Secret of two Chords with one line for each position. I`ve included left hand fingering and right hand picking rules. Observe the extensive usage of three fingers in left hand. They are crucial for speed. Attachment 68035

  24. #73

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    I don't understand that diagram, how is that even a c major scale?

  25. #74

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    We can say this is a synthesized version of the scale comprised of the major chord and its relative, but in the form of an arpeggio each (Cmaj7(6/9) and Am7(9/11), what gives us the scale without the avoid notes and can be used as a guide to the entire guitar fretboard. To fully understand the concept you'll need to watch this and other Peter videos:

  26. #75

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    Hi guys! Did you see the last video posted by Peter on YT? I think he did the thing I was asking about earlier: in the beggining of the video he makes an Fm arpeggio (based on the Secret of 2 chords shapes or an Fm7(9) arpeggio), and in the end he mixes with some notes of F harmonic minor to land on a C7. He plays the arpeggio from the 7th of F (based on the 5th region of his shapes) and when arriving at the b3 (Ab on the 5th string), he does the sequence G, F, E, Db resolving on C. Around 8 minutes in the video he suggests taking an Ab arpeggio based on one of the Secret of 2 chords shapes, and after making it ascending normally, in the descending movement he switches the 5th for a #5th.