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  1. #1

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    I have gotten tons of satisfaction learning the solos in this Jimmy Raney set published years ago by Jamey Aebersold. IN what might have been the longest running study group ever, a bunch of us learned about 6 of these, and I'd like to move on and do another one.

    I"ve selected "Groove Blues in F" because, really, who can't use some more ideas for playing blues! Of course being Jimmy Raney, this is bop lines played over blues changes.

    This one is at a moderate tempo but has lots of triplets and 16th note runs, so it's challenging.

    In past groups, we moved at a rate of 4 measures per week. Some found this too slow, so I think I'd like to try for a chorus, 12 measures, every week. If it is too fast, I'll slow down.

    I plan to do this and post on this thread whether or not anyone else joins in, just as a way to make sure I do it. But if you want to join me, by all means, do so! I'd love the company and comraderie as, like the guys on the boat in "Jaws," we share our scars and stories about how Raney's lines destroyed us.

    Here's the schedule I hope to follow:

    • August 12: Chorus 1, Mm. 1-12
    • August 19: Chorus 2, Mm. 13-24
    • August 26: Chorus 3, Mm. 25-36
    • September 2: Chorus 4, Mm. 37-48
    • September 9: Chorus 5, Mm. 49-60
    • September 16: Chorus 6, Mm. 61-End
    • September 23: Whole Dang thing at a Decent Tempo!


    IN keeping with past projects in this book, we don't criticize unless it's asked for. Alternate fingerings, picking suggestions, etc. are the bread and butter of the project, of course. We post video so that we can actually see one another crash and burn playing these solos... no, actually, so we can see how fingerings work out in actual playing.

    If you want to join in this project, you can post a reply "I'm in!' or the like, but most importantly, show up the week beginning August 12 with the first chorus under your fingers, at any reasonable tempo.

    I do hope some will join in, but if not, I hope you'll at least watch my clips and realize how much better you could do it!
    Last edited by lawson-stone; 08-04-2019 at 09:22 PM.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

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  3. #2

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    Seems like a great idea, Lawson!

    (Quibble: the title of this thread says Volume 2, not Volume 20. Volume 2 in the Aebersold series is "Nothin' But The Blues" and that might confuse some people.)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  4. #3

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    In the demo recording I hear the last note in the third bar as Db, not Eb. It's through my laptop speakers, so it might be a trick of the cheapo lo-fi. If consensus is Eb, I'll go with that.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    In the demo recording I hear the last note in the third bar as Db, not Eb. It's through my laptop speakers, so it might be a trick of the cheapo lo-fi. If consensus is Eb, I'll go with that.
    In the previous studies of the solos, we often did find places where the transcription seemed at variance with what we were hearing. Generally going with one's ear is the best route. At times also the notation does not fully capture the slippery rhythmic feel Raney imparts to his lines, so the recording is vital to capture the phrasing.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    In the demo recording I hear the last note in the third bar as Db, not Eb. It's through my laptop speakers, so it might be a trick of the cheapo lo-fi. If consensus is Eb, I'll go with that.
    I've been listening to that one and my own impression is that it's an Eb. Fits the harmonica structure too, but I isolated it with Capo! and to me it sounds like Eb. Could be wrong, we'll keep listening!
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  7. #6

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    So on these Jimmy Raney solos the real art is fingering and phrasing. We always have different approaches to fingering. So I'm going ahead and posting a very rough take on Mm. 1-15 or so at a much slower tempo, about 2/3 of the recorded tempo. One chorus I try to double right on top of Raney's guitar. The second, I try to play it with just the comping. Yeah. Got some work to do here.

    All of us who've worked on these also remember there are slight places where the tuning seems not to match exactly. Not much we can do about that, but it makes it easy to separate the "master" from the "student" in the doubled takes.

    Any suggestions on fingering from anyone else attempting this, I'm wide open to hear.

    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  8. #7

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    Nice work Lawson! The first chorus is chock-full of technical challenges and I like your approach.

    Hm. I've been practicing around the neighborhood of the 6th fret. Started there and got stuck, I guess. Now that the ice has been broken I'll see about getting my first draft recorded.


  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    Nice work Lawson! The first chorus is chock-full of technical challenges and I like your approach.

    Hm. I've been practicing around the neighborhood of the 6th fret. Started there and got stuck, I guess. Now that the ice has been broken I'll see about getting my first draft recorded.

    I always start off in the center of the neck, but this one seemed to "lay" better up high at the beginning. Yes, it's loaded with technique issues. The temptation will be to "smear" these faster lines Barney Kessell style, which of course is not the end of the world. But I hope I can play them a bit more cleanly at tempo. I'm actually liking this solo already!
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  10. #9

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    NICE STUFF LAWSON..IM JUST READING A THESIS ABOUT JIMMY...https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu...66/PDF/1/play/

  11. #10

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    Ok, take one... complete with Db. Which I rationalize as (A) augmented 5th or (B) cheapo speakers. Take your pick!


  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    Ok, take one... complete with Db. Which I rationalize as (A) augmented 5th or (B) cheapo speakers. Take your pick!

    Yes! You really nailed the feel of it. Really nice. I'll check on that Db/Eb thing again. One thing that always confuses me is that there is a guitar playing rhythm, and sometimes I don't know if I'm hearing something the rhythm guitar is playing or something Jimmy is playing. Sometimes the rhythm guitar seems (to me) to crowd onto the solo a bit. I enjoy sometimes just playing with the bass/drums part of the track.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  13. #12

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    [QUOTE=Michael Neverisky;970891]Ok, take one... complete with Db. Which I rationalize as (A) augmented 5th or (B) cheapo speakers. Take your pick!

    I just sat down with Capo! and isolated that one note and I do think now you're right, it's a Db unless I'm hearing the background guitar. Seems pretty clear though. Gotta make that little change in my fingering! Good ears!
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  14. #13

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    I have been a strict down-up picker so the sweeping arpeggios technique is new to me and something with which I am not yet comfortable. One thing I think helped improve the behind-the-beat feel for me was playing the arpeggios that start in bar 8 with only downstrokes, but making sure I was back on the beat as possible when 1 came around.

    80% of Jimmy's BPM. 16th notes, you know.

  15. #14

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    This is a kind of progress report. I've worked out fingerings up through measure 22. That double-stop passage has me scratching my head but the Bb Blues for Wes in this set has a similar passage.

    I have a hard time with playing this clean. Measure 16 is hard-I aim at the moment simply to hit beat 3 right--hoping as I get better with this I can play the first half of the measure cleanly.

    So this is about 80% tempo, once through doubling Raney's guitar, then once with just the backing track.

    This is a bit ahead of the schedule, but I find I take a long time getting things up to the tempo specified so I need a running start. Others can still join us! You know you want to, right?

    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  16. #15

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    If it's helpful, what I hear on the recording differs from what is written. I don't hear that C#, I think it's a dotted quarter on the D#.

    Quick scribble:

    Raney/Aebersold Vol 20: Groove Blues in F-img_20190809_203344-jpg

  17. #16

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    Beyond Blues: What Would Jimmy Raney Do? | 2019-08-09 | Premier Guitar

    Forum member Scott Mercer wrote this article and plays the examples. It focuses on Jimmy's treatment of the blues, so I thought it would go well here. O, there's a 3-page pdf at the link. Curiously, the pdf contains Scott's name but the article itself does not. I hope the publisher corrects that oversight soon.

    This article appears in another thread here: Jimmy Raney gets some love
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Beyond Blues: What Would Jimmy Raney Do? | 2019-08-09 | Premier Guitar

    Forum member Scott Mercer wrote this article and plays the examples. It focuses on Jimmy's treatment of the blues, so I thought it would go well here. O, there's a 3-page pdf at the link. Curiously, the pdf contains Scott's name but the article itself does not. I hope the publisher corrects that oversight soon.

    This article appears in another thread here: Jimmy Raney gets some love
    Thanks for this Mark. It looks like a great resource for Raney fans.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  19. #18

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    There's a lot to learn here... anyone else care to join in the fun?

    First two choruses. Left hand doesn't move as fast as it used to and those 16ths in bar 4 continue to vex.

    On that bootleg private lesson recording that's floating around, Jimmy talks about not being square... or 4-by-4, as he puts it. The accents on those chromatic lines at the end of the 2nd chorus is a good example and, for me, a challenge to stay in the pocket. Focusing on the sound of the high hat helps.


  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    If it's helpful, what I hear on the recording differs from what is written. I don't hear that C#, I think it's a dotted quarter on the D#.

    Quick scribble:

    Raney/Aebersold Vol 20: Groove Blues in F-img_20190809_203344-jpg
    Playing along with Raney, I kept thinking something was amiss. I seemed to fit the solo better if I missed a note. This explains why!
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    Playing along with Raney, I kept thinking something was amiss. I seemed to fit the solo better if I missed a note. This explains why!
    Ugh... I thought I posted this correction to my correction earlier. That first scribble, made while listening to my lo-fi phone, is incorrect. Listening to the track on a better speaker I am now confident that this is what Jimmy is playing:

    Raney/Aebersold Vol 20: Groove Blues in F-img_20190810_103413-jpg

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    Ugh... I thought I posted this correction to my correction earlier. That first scribble, made while listening to my lo-fi phone, is incorrect. Listening to the track on a better speaker I am now confident that this is what Jimmy is playing:

    Raney/Aebersold Vol 20: Groove Blues in F-img_20190810_103413-jpg
    having played 6 or 7 of the other solos, I can say this also fits better with other lines in the book and feels right when I play along with the recording.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  23. #22

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    So here's my shot at the first two choruses, still at a reduced tempo and even here, struggling to play it clean and still groping for nailing the time/phrasing. This is a challenging little knot of lines! Still, I'd rather play Jimmy Raney poorly than many other things well. Something about his ideas just fires me up.

    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  24. #23

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    Sharing an idea.


  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    Sharing an idea.

    That's the way I'm playing it. Agreed on the need to move as little as needed. I am having a little trouble keeping the barred notes clean, but I have always been to loose with my barring and it's a good thing to work on.

    That lick actually has the most "blues lick" feeling of anything I've played by Raney. He had to crack a grin when he played it.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  26. #25

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    So... moving on to chorus 3... for the first time ever in playing one of these Raney solos, I find this chorus somehow doesn't "work" for me. I'm learning it, and I assume it's my lead-footedness and unhipness, but this chorus just seems choppy. Melodic ideas do certainly inter-related and mirror, but the overall effect for me is weak.

    But that's how new material always seems at first, right?
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  27. #26

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    First two bars of the third chorus, the rhythm isn't accurate, as written it's a bit stiff. Listening to the way Jimmy swings, that final F note almost on the downbeat of the third bar.

    What is becoming increasingly evident is Jimmy's fondness of chromatic "approach arpeggios", I'll call them. The D flat minor into the C minor and then the A flat minor into the G minor later we saw a similar things in the previous two choruses.

  28. #27

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    Here's the 3rd chorus, at about 125 bpm. I finally "got" the phrasing on this chorus and it makes sense to me, a change from before when I felt it was a bit disjointed.
    I'm especially enjoying playing through this old 1965 (or so) Silvertone 1484 "Twin Twelve" head, which uses 2 6L6 tubes. This thing isn't just vintage, it's an artifact. All the tubes are factory original, and I think every capacitor and pot is as well. Likely it could use some replacement parts, but I rather like how it sounds now, especially with the ES175 "Figured" model I got from the CME blowout last year. The 4 Ohm 10" speaker is mic'd with a Bluebird Blue microphone.

    It goes without saying I guess that how this thing sounds "live" and how it sounds coming over YouTube... well, maybe there is a contrast.

    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    First two bars of the third chorus, the rhythm isn't accurate, as written it's a bit stiff. Listening to the way Jimmy swings, that final F note almost on the downbeat of the third bar.

    What is becoming increasingly evident is Jimmy's fondness of chromatic "approach arpeggios", I'll call them. The D flat minor into the C minor and then the A flat minor into the G minor later we saw a similar things in the previous two choruses.
    Yes, I think that's also a very strong bebop approach. The half-step approach shows up in a lot of these solos. I just wish I could reproduce it in my own improvisation.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  30. #29

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    Thought I'd try doing all three choruses here at about 85% of the original tempo, about 127-130 bpm.

    Still finding mm 1-6 hard to get right... but trying to get the groove anyhow.

    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  31. #30

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    Third chorus at about 120bpm. I hear Jimmy playing unison F notes on the 2nd and 3rd strings.



    Chorus 1 through the "be bop" at the end of 3. I think 80% is still pushing it for me both in how fast my fingers can move and my ability to keep in time.



  32. #31

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    Really nice. You have the actual articulation and time much better than I do on the 16th note passages. I tried 85% tempo above, and that's really my "totally falling apart" point. I plan to back down to the best tempo at which I can play the phrases accurately and build up from there.

    Love the sound of that guitar too!
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  33. #32

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    I should really back down to 75% to play more confidently.

    I love this guitar - it's an inspiration to me every time I pick it up. Video was made with my trusty AA-powered MicroCube and my almost-trusty Pixel 2 phone.

    On to page 2 of the transcription!

  34. #33

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    So I've had trouble with the time feel on measures 4-7 and today noticed something that has helped me a lot. I had been focusing on the way the line trills (or whatever it's called) on the Ab/C, and just couldn't make it feel right. Then I noticed how Raney uses a sort of contrast between the static nature of those figures by using voice leading in mm. 5-7, putting it in the lowest register of the solo. I noticed that on beat 1 of measures 5, 6, and 7 is a chromatic line descending D Db C. The Db is on the upbeat of 1, but still at beat 1.

    I started practicing simply getting the feel for placing those notes, then playing the intervening notes however I had to for the chromatic line to "hit." That has been a tremendous help, and now I feel like I'm not groping on those measures in the same way I was before. It's a small thing, but it also shows how Raney constructed such amazing lines. He's got that descending bass line tracking the changes, and using the trill on the high C note to create a kind of illusion of a pedal tone.

    I know I've made a hash out of the terminology here... but I feel I had a break through in not just understanding this line, but in actually playing it with more confidence.

    Raney/Aebersold Vol 20: Groove Blues in F-grooveblues5-7-png
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    .... He's got that descending bass line tracking the changes...

    Nice analysis!

  36. #35

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    So in chorus 4 I'm seeing that my approach is going to really turn on how I play 4 innocent little 8th notes in measure 42:
    Raney/Aebersold Vol 20: Groove Blues in F-groove-blues-f-c4-jpg

    Those 4 little notes are big intervals that descend, and I'm not finding many obviously smooth places to play them. Currently I'm thinking:

    Raney/Aebersold Vol 20: Groove Blues in F-img_4314-jpg

    Then of course it would be useful to build the rest of the solo's positioning so that this is smooth. But I still don't know. Some really knotty melodic ideas in this chorus.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  37. #36

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    So spending some time thinking about how these choruses works, trying to feel my way with the groove of it, I have nursed my tempo up to 90%/135 bpm. Still choppy on mm. 4-7 and 16, but now I have in my head how it is supposed to feel so that even when I miss notes or make mistakes, I'm landing on the right spot after recovering. Mistakes now are more like dropping a note, not falling off the groove. That feels good. Also, I learned on the other solos that practicing slow is not always the best way to play fast. Higher tempos require at least for me, a different approach and technique that isn't the same as playing it slow and just speeding it up, but playing it the same way. The tempo dictates techniques and sometimes even fingerings, at least for me. So I wanted to push the tempo, risk the mistakes, and try to land on my feet when I mess up.

    So I have at least used cool gear. Gibson L5ces will always take care of me. The Silvertone 1484 with its 55 year old 6L6 tubes just sags and lurches along, smooth and sweet as it can be. When you are riding a wonderful horse, you really don't care much where you go!

    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    Raney/Aebersold Vol 20: Groove Blues in F-groove-blues-f-c4-jpg
    Good question. The timbre of the Ab that starts the figure sounds the same to me as the timbre of the high Ab in the previous measure. So I think they are played in the same place on the fingerboard. My working solution at this point involves... get ready for it... playing the D string open. I start the figure from the second string, eigth fret.

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    Good question. The timbre of the Ab that starts the figure sounds the same to me as the timbre of the high Ab in the previous measure. So I think they are played in the same place on the fingerboard. My working solution at this point involves... get ready for it... playing the D string open. I start the figure from the second string, eigth fret.
    I thought hard about that open D String too... but for now I'm playing it on the A string, catching the C note on the E string. I have a 2/3 time play-through of the whole chorus done and will post this afternoon for your review and suggestions.

    Also... have you caught any problems with the last measure of the chorus? What I'm hearing at the moment (I haven't really drilled down into it yet) seems different. Might just be accenting, but I think I need to look at that last measure more closely.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    Also... have you caught any problems with the last measure of the chorus? What I'm hearing at the moment (I haven't really drilled down into it yet) seems different. Might just be accenting, but I think I need to look at that last measure more closely.
    Yes, I agree. And the notation is misleading. What I hear is closer to this:

    Raney/Aebersold Vol 20: Groove Blues in F-img_20190825_083121-jpg


    As you mentioned in a previous post, when something is unclear or challenging I start with the strong beats. And here I hear a D# solidly on beat 3. That's a hammer-on pull-off between C# and D#... my scribble isn't clear, two 16th notes on the downbeat of 3, the upbeat of 3 is the A#.


    I just captured my latest attempt moments ago while my dog was expressing her outrage about something or other in the background.

    .

  41. #40

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    Well done on playing through FOUR choruses. We are cruising along. I didn't check it, but you are pretty close to the full tempo to, aren't you?

    Your interpretation of that last measure strikes me as correct. I will try to listen to it more carefully today and see if I come up with anything different.

    This solo is turning out to be one that at least for me, is easier to match to the changes and sections of a typical blues. The "Bb Blues for Wes" was a real challenge for me on that point, but it was also couple years ago. I think working through these solos over about 3-4 years has done a lot for my ear, and for me sense of where I am in a solo. I will try to get my clip posted today or tomorrow.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  42. #41

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    I'm not sure about the tempo. I used a different device and different software for mp3 playback. Might be closer to the Raney tempo because I felt like the sequence of phrases made more sense.

    This is my first venture into one of these Abersold listen-and-learn things. And, yes, I also feel like I'm learning something. Chromatic approach arpeggios! 8-)

    Looking forward to hearing what you come up with.

  43. #42

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    So I drilled into m. 48 for a bit today. I think you have the notes exactly right. My own notation of it (below) is just slightly different, with an 8th rest rather than a tie and a triplet rather than the 3 note 16th/8th figure. Those are pretty slight differences though, and the main thing I think is that the notes in the published notation were pretty off. The feel on yours or mine would be pretty close.
    Raney/Aebersold Vol 20: Groove Blues in F-m-48-jpg
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  44. #43

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    So here's a stab at mm. 1-48 at about 130 bpm, which is maybe 85% tempo. Mm. 4-5 remain my main problem, which is bad because it's right at the start. I now think in terms of just reducing the number of missed notes! A few other places I think I rushed a little but caught it pretty quickly. M. 16 continues also to be a challenge and I need to study that measure more closely. Still, this solo seems always to end up sounding better than I initially expected, which is fun.

    Using the 1970's Aria Pro II PE180 here, which is a seriously wonderful guitar. The neck is a bit thick which might account for a few clams...

    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  45. #44

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    Good work.

    This all feels to me like trying to get inside someone's head and that's not a simple thing to do. Like an actor who doesn't want to simply recite words. An actor needs to convey the character with contextually relevant sentences.

    I try to consider chord shapes when choosing a fingering. For example, is the line something that falls naturally out of a chord? Also, I subscribe to the Jimmy Bruno tonal center position approach, so more the better if the fingering doesn't cause me to lose my compass.

    The Aria sounds fine, indeed! I once had my hands on an Aria Robert Conti... PE190, maybe? With a floating p'up. The neck grew quite cumbersome up towards the body. What Martin Taylor calls the dusty end of the fingerboard. Is that what you mean?

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    Good work.

    This all feels to me like trying to get inside someone's head and that's not a simple thing to do. Like an actor who doesn't want to simply recite words. An actor needs to convey the character with contextually relevant sentences.

    I try to consider chord shapes when choosing a fingering. For example, is the line something that falls naturally out of a chord? Also, I subscribe to the Jimmy Bruno tonal center position approach, so more the better if the fingering doesn't cause me to lose my compass.

    The Aria sounds fine, indeed! I once had my hands on an Aria Robert Conti... PE190, maybe? With a floating p'up. The neck grew quite cumbersome up towards the body. What Martin Taylor calls the dusty end of the fingerboard. Is that what you mean?
    On the fingering, I am increasingly spotting the shapes and patterns that Jimmy seems to use a lot. I also know from watching clips of him playing that he was more prone to play up and down the fingerboard, reaching and shifting, than playing in position the way that Joe Pass does, who never seems to ever have to reach for a note. So this time I've been doing the reaching and stretching... can't yet say how that's going to turn out, though. I like playing in position.

    The neck in general is the chunky 1970's Gibson style neck. I actually think it's fine, but if I've played my other guitars a lot and then just pickup the Aria like I did today, the neck size takes a little adjustment, especially also moving to the long scale after playing mainly ES175s. But it's all good. I haven't found that neck any more difficult up high, but then I don't try the stuff Martin Taylor can try!

    I might try tomorrow to do a clip with my Epiphone Zephyr Regent re-issue which has a pretty fast neck and see if it comes any easier. I love recording all these different guitars just to see how much it really matters once the amp and recording process are done.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  47. #46

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    I have been focusing on getting 1-4 right, and I slowed down until I found a tempo where I could play it right, but still had to really focus to get it right. I tried several takes, none of which were perfect, but decided to post this one simply as an interim effort at playing the thing correctly. I've also started working out the next chorus, which is a little odd in spots. Lots of Raney's beloved chromaticism going on there.

    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    On the fingering, I am increasingly spotting the shapes and patterns that Jimmy seems to use a lot.

    Indeed. We can extract, generalize and outright steal them for our own use. Even as we come up with different approaches, that is to say...

    also know from watching clips of him playing that he was more prone to play up and down the fingerboard
    Interesting. I haven't seen many videos of Jimmy. I look at these phrases and when the fingering isn't obvious I look for clues in what preceded or follows. That bit at the end of the 4th chorus only makes sense to me, and aligns with my experience as a guitar player, to play it in 1st position, for example. It can certainly be played elsewhere on the fretboard, as you've demonstrated, but it seems unnatural to this old dog.

    I should be able to capture the 5th chorus this weekend. It's got some playful patterns.... what happens if we move this lick over here... or start it on a different beat. And then I see a lot of ink in the chorus that follows... so time to drop the tempo back.

    Sounding good Lawson!

  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    Indeed. We can extract, generalize and outright steal them for our own use. Even as we come up with different approaches, that is to say...



    Interesting. I haven't seen many videos of Jimmy. I look at these phrases and when the fingering isn't obvious I look for clues in what preceded or follows. That bit at the end of the 4th chorus only makes sense to me, and aligns with my experience as a guitar player, to play it in 1st position, for example. It can certainly be played elsewhere on the fretboard, as you've demonstrated, but it seems unnatural to this old dog.

    I should be able to capture the 5th chorus this weekend. It's got some playful patterns.... what happens if we move this lick over here... or start it on a different beat. And then I see a lot of ink in the chorus that follows... so time to drop the tempo back.

    Sounding good Lawson!
    Actually one of the things I love about the guitar is how you can play the same phrase in different places. The tone is different. I don't understand people who want every note on the guitar to sound the same everywhere it's played. I love exploiting the relative differences in tone played up high or down low. Like you, I tend to look for the closest place to play a phrase, and I have developed some habits from the other solos, not necessarily good ones. I need to look at your clip again to see how you handle some of the phrases I"ve struggled a bit with.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  50. #49

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    Choruses 1 through 5 played to a metronome at 126 bpm, click on 2 and 4. Still some work to do as I can hear myself rushing the beat in a few places. When I'm back in the woodshed I'll slow the machine way down and try to sort out those 16th. I have learned from experience that he beat way to learn to play fast passages is to play them v e r y s l o w l y for a while.




  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    Choruses 1 through 5 played to a metronome at 126 bpm, click on 2 and 4. Still some work to do as I can hear myself rushing the beat in a few places. When I'm back in the woodshed I'll slow the machine way down and try to sort out those 16th. I have learned from experience that he beat way to learn to play fast passages is to play them v e r y s l o w l y for a while.



    Nice indeed. The solo really goes classic "Jimmy Raney" in the last 4 measures. Those are some pretty outside lines. Who says the Blues must be simple?

    I hope to have mine up today, about the same tempo.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town