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  1. #1

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    Hey everyone,

    I thought I'd share this here. It's a followup video to my last one which discussed a technique I use for get a pianistic, almost Bill Evans-ish, quality to our comping and our harmony using simple triads. This one uses the same technique for creating really clear, precise, uncluttered, melodic phrasing - no scales or outlining changes.

    I put it up on facebook a little while back, but finally got around to posting it to YouTube yesterday.

    Give it a shot, let me know what you think.


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2
    In case you missed the previous video that covers the harmonic version of this idea, I'll drop that here too so you can check it out as well to help put the above video into context.


  4. #3

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    Your youtube lesson makes me want to take another Skype lesson with you...

    in due time, brother!

    Great stuff!

  5. #4
    Sounds like you're getting some great guidance as it is! Always around to chat with though. Great crossing paths in the private message and youtube though... as always.
    Hope all's well in the PSW.

  6. #5

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    I joined your lvl 2 triad boot camp!

    I use different triad shapes that are alterations of what I learned from James Chirillo (he learned them from studying Johnny Smith)

    Do the "shapes" and "fingerings" matter, or is it just the range and notes for the first week and onward?

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Irez87 View Post
    I joined your lvl 2 triad boot camp!

    I use different triad shapes that are alterations of what I learned from James Chirillo (he learned them from studying Johnny Smith)

    Do the "shapes" and "fingerings" matter, or is it just the range and notes for the first week and onward?
    I'd love to know what shapes you use that trickle down from Johnny.

    I get asked about the 3 positions I present in Bootcamp a lot. No, they're not the ONLY shapes I look at on the fretboard. I've been through the ringer with just about every organization system I've come across over the last 25+ years trying to grapple with the fretboard. When I had to relearn a few years ago I didn't have a lot of fuel in the tank. I physically couldn't spend much time each day on the instrument, but I wanted to improve and get back to playing MUSIC as quickly as possible. So I decided to break everything down to the most essential. For melody and harmony, that was shell voicings and triads (and eventually quadratonics by adding that one extra tension note to the triad).

    For organizing the fretboard a second time around, I decided to focus on as few positions as possible that would yield the best bang for my buck. Those 3 essentially gave me every note needed to cover the range of the instrument. Yes, I did eventually start playing with in between "positions"... but I often look at those as just jumping between 2 of the 3 presented. I also have "extensions" where I might take 1 or 2 notes from a position and bump them to a different string. I think of this as like the moon orbiting the planet. Sometimes it's on one side of the sky, sometimes it's on the other side... but it's the same "moon" (note) and it's being held in place by the gravity of the "earth" (position).

    There are a ton of other ways to dig in deeper within triads in terms of their organization on the fretboard, but again, the goal for me was to get back in and start making real music again as quickly as possible. The theory and the physical/visual organization was only there to serve the function of moving back to music quickly. When I started teaching again, I decided to focus on that philosophy with the study materials I present. The theory is VERY heavy. I wanted to help break down the process of internalizing it and helping other musicians make music with as quick and efficient as possible.

    If you have the time and desire to alter those positions or expand outwards, by all means, go for it. I find these 3 positions enough to get to music making. And especially once a musician works through our triad shapes and our quadratonic ideas and wants to get into our "tonalities" where they superimpose triads and quadratonics over top of a shell voicing (like a pianist using their right hand to play a certain structure over top of their left hand which might be playing a very basic chord), the ability to see these triad and quadratonic shapes within a position can be REALLY helpful to getting comfortable with the approach and playing music without getting too stuck memorizing advanced theory for 10 years first.

  8. #7

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    My triad fingerings are a combination of Johnny Smith and what feels good under my fingers.

    I know this rubs a lot of people the wrong way--including my mentor--but I really don't like using "partial barres" and "full barres" when I play single lines.

    I can play partial barres and full barres, but they never feel natural under my fingers when I play single lines (harmony is a different story, I don't mind 'em). Lage Lund agrees with me here, finally I found someone who thinks along those same lines.

    I prefer using three fingers, with the pinky only when necessary.

    So the way I "finger" my triads, 7th chord arp's, and beyond--is reflected in a fingering that is comfortable under my fingers.

    I can play 4 octave (if I don't run out of fret board) triads up the neck in a continuous motion because I am comfy with shifts as well.

    I could send you a private youtube video of how I handle triads, if that would be helpful.

    That said, even your triads in cycle four exercise (week 1) forced me into exploring new fingerings, but they fell within the same concept of "no partial bars, and use three fingers as much as possible".

    Your exercise is already helping me put together triads that I've worked on for years in a way that I never did before! And it's getting that triad sound more ingrained in my inner ear, I like that VERY much

    Man, we gotta figure out a better way to converse about all this, no? Any ideas?

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Irez87 View Post
    My triad fingerings are a combination of Johnny Smith and what feels good under my fingers.

    I know this rubs a lot of people the wrong way--including my mentor--but I really don't like using "partial barres" and "full barres" when I play single lines.

    I can play partial barres and full barres, but they never feel natural under my fingers when I play single lines (harmony is a different story, I don't mind 'em). Lage Lund agrees with me here, finally I found someone who thinks along those same lines.

    I prefer using three fingers, with the pinky only when necessary.

    So the way I "finger" my triads, 7th chord arp's, and beyond--is reflected in a fingering that is comfortable under my fingers.

    I can play 4 octave (if I don't run out of fret board) triads up the neck in a continuous motion because I am comfy with shifts as well.

    I could send you a private youtube video of how I handle triads, if that would be helpful.

    That said, even your triads in cycle four exercise (week 1) forced me into exploring new fingerings, but they fell within the same concept of "no partial bars, and use three fingers as much as possible".

    Your exercise is already helping me put together triads that I've worked on for years in a way that I never did before! And it's getting that triad sound more ingrained in my inner ear, I like that VERY much

    Man, we gotta figure out a better way to converse about all this, no? Any ideas?
    I'm actually kind of similar when it comes to partial barres and rolling. With my coaching students, I generally recommend that they begin like you're talking about. One finger per note. Not jumping, barring, or rolling fingers across strings. The reason being that we're sacrificing control. We can't ever be 100% in control of every individual note if we're using the same finger to play another note at the same time... or preparing for that next note while still producing the previous note.... even if only for a micro second. Dynamics, attack, decay, articulation... all these things are hyper important to me in terms of breathing life into notes. It's not JUST about the sounds we're playing, but HOW we're playing them. So I think cultivating a left hand technique that allows for the greatest level of these elements is ideal.

    That said, I do think there is a place for barring and rolling and that usually comes later and it's more for when we're working on developing speed and "flash". Our Bootcamp programs have little to do with that. THey're primarily about making sure a musician has a really strong foundation that they can make music with and then grow from. So I generally recommend my coaching students do what you're talking about.

    Hope the practicing is going well.
    j

  10. #9

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    I use partial barres but wish I didn’t

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I use partial barres but wish I didn’t
    If I had a penny for everything I did that I wished I didn't...