1. #1

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    Is there a methodology or rule (or even chart) to learn how to locate and play specific guitar chord tones, e.g., dominant 6, 13, Flat 5, 9 etc – on the 6th and 5th string/root. So say I’m trying to work out how to play a minor 6th chord – I know how to play a 7th – is it the case that I simply move the dominant 7th position down one fret to play a 6th? Or am I barking up the wrong tree?

    I’m using Glen Rose’s excellent Gateway to Jazz to learn some basic jazz chords, which is very helpful but I’d like to know (and learn independently) if there is a process for working chord shapes out just by understanding some theory.

    I hope this makes sense?

    Thanks

    Craig


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  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    To turn either of the dominant shapes you show into minor 6 you have to move both the 3rd and the 7th down one fret (and to complete the chord you might also add the 5th).

  4. #3

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    Yes,

    I. First learn your drop 2 and 3 voicings as such:


    1. From bass strings 6,5, (and 4)
    2. Root position
    3. Name the tones for each chord out loud "root, 5th, 7th, 3rd", or "root, 7th, 3rd, 5th", etc. If it's b7, or b3, or b5 say that or alternatively "minor 7, minor 3rd, diminished 5th". The point is to make sure that you know which tone is played on each string for each chord voicing that is played
    4. For a given drop 2 or 3 chord play the following chords in the following order: Maj7, Dom7, Mi7, Mi7b5, Dim7. This will have you altering one chord tone at a time, and you should be aware of what tone it is.



    II. Then play the chords while a friend (or recording) calls out their quality randomly.

    III. Then add a few more 7th chord qualities to the list Maj7#5, Maj7b5, etc., etc.

    IV. Then move on to chords with tensions 7b9, 7#9, 13, 13b9, etc. For these chords, select some voicings that you like that are widely used. There are many possibilities for voicings, some tones are typically dropped, so choices are made.

    Finally, move on to inversions for parts I-III above.

    That should keep you busy for a while. Good luck!

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by craigmill View Post
    Is there a methodology or rule (or even chart) to learn how to locate and play specific guitar chord tones, e.g., dominant 6, 13, Flat 5, 9 etc – on the 6th and 5th string/root. So say I’m trying to work out how to play a minor 6th chord – I know how to play a 7th – is it the case that I simply move the dominant 7th position down one fret to play a 6th? Or am I barking up the wrong tree?
    More than one way to do it, but here's the way I did it and what I recommend to students.

    Learn the notes on the fingerboard.

    Learn how chords are constructed.

    Start with 7th chords. Then move the b7 to 7 and then to 6. Move the 3 to b3 and do the b7, 7 and 6 again. Also move the 5 to b5 (some may prefer thinking about #11) and to #5. And, do it all again with b9, 9 and #9. That's a lot of chords. To simplify it, do 7, maj7, maj6, m7, m6, minmaj7, 7b5, and maybe m6b5 (which is diminished).

    I'd also suggest organizing the 7th chords by starting with xx3433. Then move note to the next note in the chord on the same string. So, move each one up and you get xx5767 and, later, two more inversions. Then do it with x5546x. And whatever other grip you like.

    That's your dictionary. Then start playing tunes and plugging them in.
    Last edited by rpjazzguitar; 07-11-2019 at 03:33 AM.

  6. #5
    Hi, thanks to everyone for you helpful advice and suggestions - I’ll take everything on board, thank you.


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