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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by dot75 View Post
    Mimi Fox interview

    Mimi Fox Expands Jazz Guitar from the Inside Out - GuitarPlayer.com

    'As an educator, what is the most prevalent problem with jazz guitar students?
    For one thing, they don’t practice enough. They want it overnight, and they don’t work on essentials such as arpeggios. Also, I typically encounter two types of students: those that are devoted and put in the hours, but don’t have a good time feel or don’t swing or have some other serious issues musically; and those that have a lot of innate musical talent, but are lazy. The study of any art form requires tremendous discipline, and jazz is paradoxical in that all this discipline is so that when you get up on stage you can play freely.
    Another thing is that students don’t do enough transcribing. They think that somehow they’ll get their own sound by osmosis. And, although it is actually by osmosis—it’s an osmosis that has to happen from listening and working to acquire important harmonic and melodic data by really digging into the music. I can play dozens of solos note-for-note that are still in my head from the first transcriptions that I did, and that’s because I spent so much time listening and then writing those solos down and tapping out the rhythms. So, again, paradoxically you get your own sound by listening to other people. But you don’t get it by saying you are going to get it—you have to work at it.'

    I fall into a third category, talentless and lazy.
    Haha! Never mind, you still may be able to find some youngsters to play some one chord vampy Fusion with...

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    "When you can snatch the eighth-note from my hand, it will be time for you to go."

    How to get better at improvising?-61e3655180c627bb117631825787fd38-jpg
    "As for me, all I know is that I know nothing." - Socrates
    “Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun.” - Alan Wilson Watts

  4. #53

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    or maybe it will be time to start on 16ths?

  5. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    Patriot81 -



    That's not what your post #1 indicated at all.



    Different styles are different styles. Technically-speaking what one can do on a guitar is the same, it's how the techniques are applied. R&B isn't jazz any more than, say, reggae or bluegrass is jazz. But the techniques are the same - scales, arpeggios, pentatonics, passing notes, etc etc. It's all in the delivery.
    my bad, nevermind what I said, basically I am a beginner at jazz style soloing

  6. #55
    So right now I'm going through the Mickey baker as my main course of study, and to implement those ideas, I have the CP onimibook and a book of Charlie Christian solo, I figure analyzing what that did and try to incorporate their ideas into my playing would help.

  7. #56
    https://www.amazon.com/Mel-Bay-Swing.../dp/0786673192
    I was able to get this Charlie Christian book that has a number of his solos and analyzed solos and the author went over a number of his ideas and techniques, been learning his Rose Room solo!
    So for I think I would want to base my style of Charlie Parker and Charlie Christian, it will a lot of studying and fun!.

  8. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    I think we all want to 'keep getting better at soloing over jazz changes', it's a lifelong process that never stops. Even Pat Metheny said he is an eternal student of the guitar. You've already started that process by learning some Parker phrases and thinking about writing your own solos. Keep doing stuff like that. Personally I always found this process to be interesting enough, even 'fun', to keep doing it, despite any frustration along the way.

    In my case, I suppose I followed princeplanet's approach i.e. mainly copying stuff off jazz records until I could make up my own lines. I also learned enough theory and technical stuff (scales, arps etc) to support that process, however that was not my primary focus.

    But I was able to play some decent lines over a simple tune like Autumn Leaves after a year or so, I don't think it needs to take years to get to a point like that.
    Im in the same place as well! I love theory and the more theoretical aspects of jazz, and looking at some of Charlie Parker's lines, it seems he's not doing any thing out of this world from a theory standpoint, but its the way he does of the changes that's awesome. Especially the blues.
    I need to learn autumn leaves as well

  9. #58

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    I’ve found that singing along with your soloing — like George Benson, for example — instantly makes it more musical and interesting. The act of vocalizing triggers something magical in the brain that translates to the fingers.

  10. #59
    I'm learning to improvise also but my case there's a catch when trying to improve with practicing a lot.
    After a some days of all sorts of routines, the rhythm gets snappy, more confidence, you know all the technical shape gets better. But it tends to get automatic. "Better" but it's a little numb, a little predictable. Not fully satisfying. Recording my solo, seeing that it IS actually better now but not pleasing in the right way.. that's quite frustrating. And on top of that, I know bloody sure that I've done better with way less knowledge, skill etc.

    Now I'm after getting "emotionally" connected to the guitar, so that just about any note would make me feel good.. even the funky wrong ones

    *mini-compositions. Just pick a short chord progression and try create a good passage over it. "good" meaning a "lightbulb" moment.
    *playing lots of simple hit tunes by ear, connecting them always to my scale patterns that I use.
    *listen how a single long note FEELS against another(bass) note, or a chord.
    *listen before playing a thing. If doing that, I can start hearing the new note or chord in my mind. It's a real thing, this really happens

    Well, those are my mind games. Seems to be working, sometimes surprisingly well.

  11. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patriot81 View Post
    https://www.amazon.com/Mel-Bay-Swing.../dp/0786673192
    I was able to get this Charlie Christian book that has a number of his solos and analyzed solos and the author went over a number of his ideas and techniques, been learning his Rose Room solo!
    So for I think I would want to base my style of Charlie Parker and Charlie Christian, it will a lot of studying and fun!.
    Great, just as long as you realize that Christian was a bit early. I would advise that you learn some of his stuff - for sure - but don't get stuck in the swing era for too long (unless that's your bag, baby ).

    If you want to align with Christian and Bird I would also recommend that you check out Joe Pass' books. He's fully steeped in bebop and swing and breaks down a lot for you. He lived longer than Charlie and Wes and made some time to produce some learning materials. There is also a Joe Pass Omnibook now. Learn some Wes solos, or portions thereof, as well!

  12. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzstdnt View Post
    Great, just as long as you realize that Christian was a bit early. I would advise that you learn some of his stuff - for sure - but don't get stuck in the swing era for too long (unless that's your bag, baby ).

    If you want to align with Christian and Bird I would also recommend that you check out Joe Pass' books. He's fully steeped in bebop and swing and breaks down a lot for you. He lived longer than Charlie and Wes and made some time to produce some learning materials. There is also a Joe Pass Omnibook now. Learn some Wes solos, or portions thereof, as well!
    I love Joe Pass and Wes! i have heard of Joes guitar style books, so his books are not solo guitar based? Like could his ideas apply to group soloing?
    For Wes one solo I love is his for on six solo, but can't find sheet music for it online, so I might have to learn it by ear.

  13. #62
    Also when learning solos, what are somethings I should be doing to while learning the solos in order to be useful for my own playing outside of what im learning. I have heard things like find lines that I like and transpose them to every key and to make variations of those licks.

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by dot75 View Post
    Mimi Fox interview

    Mimi Fox Expands Jazz Guitar from the Inside Out - GuitarPlayer.com

    'As an educator, what is the most prevalent problem with jazz guitar students?
    For one thing, they don’t practice enough. They want it overnight, and they don’t work on essentials such as arpeggios. Also, I typically encounter two types of students: those that are devoted and put in the hours, but don’t have a good time feel or don’t swing or have some other serious issues musically; and those that have a lot of innate musical talent, but are lazy. The study of any art form requires tremendous discipline, and jazz is paradoxical in that all this discipline is so that when you get up on stage you can play freely.
    Another thing is that students don’t do enough transcribing. They think that somehow they’ll get their own sound by osmosis. And, although it is actually by osmosis—it’s an osmosis that has to happen from listening and working to acquire important harmonic and melodic data by really digging into the music. I can play dozens of solos note-for-note that are still in my head from the first transcriptions that I did, and that’s because I spent so much time listening and then writing those solos down and tapping out the rhythms. So, again, paradoxically you get your own sound by listening to other people. But you don’t get it by saying you are going to get it—you have to work at it.'

    I fall into a third category, talentless and lazy.
    Mimi is an encyclopedia of jazz vocabulary. You can hear it when she solos. But, to me, the unique thing about her playing is her intense sense of time. She was a drummer first, and attributes it to that. The word crisp doesn't do her justice. Also, she has massive chops.

  15. #64
    Here a clip of me improvising on How High the Moon, I tried several things
    I tried to improvise based on the melody
    then I tried to solo on the big strings with a kind of figure I made up
    I was learning ornithology by Charlie Parker and found they are the same changes, so I used some ideas from the start of his solo on there.
    Feel free to destroy me on this solo lol. Im trying!
    Attached Files Attached Files

  16. #65

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    Patriot -

    Well done. It's so refreshing to find an enquirer on here who doesn't just ask a question and then disappears. Not only have you stuck at it but you've had the BALLS to show us a clip. Brilliant.

    Okay, here's my reaction. First, too fast for a starter. HHTM isn't a beginner's tune. So, slow it down a tad and take it easy with an easier tune and chord progression. Autumn Leaves sounds a good idea.

    Then notes. It's not bad but, as I say, at that speed you're going to sacrifice note choices. I think it was Joe Pass who said if the backing is removed you should be able to make out the chords by the notes. I don't know if I'm making that clear.

    I can hear what you're doing. On what basis are you playing those lines? I know you said Charlie Parker but he's an expert and you have to know why you're playing what you're playing. Is it basically scales or playing around the chord shapes? Those are the two main approaches before it gets far more advanced.

    That's enough destruction (!). What do you say?