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  1. #1

    David Baker 101 Bebop Era Patterns

    Hi,
    In this tread I intend to post videos with the patterns found in the book David Baker "Learning the Bebop Language Vol.2, every five to complete the 101, all on the C major scale.

    https://mpcsouza10.wixsite.com/practcingarchives/video

    Cheers!
    Maurício Souza

  2. #2
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    They all sound familiar. I think a lot of players use this book, not just guitarists.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    They all sound familiar. I think a lot of players use this book, not just guitarists.

    Indeed, I think more non-guitarists than guitarists use it.(No tab! ;o)
    David Baker knew his stuff.
    “Love is not blind; that is the last thing that it is. Love is bound; and the more it is bound the less it is blind.”
    -- G. K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

  4. #4
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    I think it was Doug Webb the tenor player talking about at one point he played (read) through the entire book everyday. In beginning would take hours and hours over time he got it to where he could play the whole book in an hour. I would bet all that work a lot of those lines remain in your subconscious forever.

    There are two series of these books. The earlier one were basically all lines and little text, then Baker did a second series and cut down on the lines and added more explanations.

  5. #5
    Sure, the book is in concert key, thought it is the most general to be played in every instrument without making many diferent editions of the same book. For guitarrist, i believe the best is do it in your own position. A great variet of sounds can be taken from the same phrases.
    Thanks.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by docbop View Post
    I think it was Doug Webb the tenor player talking about at one point he played (read) through the entire book everyday. In beginning would take hours and hours over time he got it to where he could play the whole book in an hour. I would bet all that work a lot of those lines remain in your subconscious forever.

    There are two series of these books. The earlier one were basically all lines and little text, then Baker did a second series and cut down on the lines and added more explanations.
    Way back early 1960s..I remember seeing ads for David Baker books in DownBeat..he was one of the first to get jazz education to the general public..I would read the ads and wonder what the features mentioned were "substitutions..ii7-V7..turnarounds" etc.. around the same timeframe Dr Billy Taylor had the JazzMobile..he would teach jazz to young school kids..he had a TV show on a local station in NYC that i watched as often as I could..it was fascinating watching him explain how jazz works in tunes..one of the factors that brought me to playing music
    play well ...
    wolf

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolflen View Post
    Way back early 1960s..I remember seeing ads for David Baker books in DownBeat..he was one of the first to get jazz education to the general public..I would read the ads and wonder what the features mentioned were "substitutions..ii7-V7..turnarounds" etc.. around the same timeframe Dr Billy Taylor had the JazzMobile..he would teach jazz to young school kids..he had a TV show on a local station in NYC that i watched as often as I could..it was fascinating watching him explain how jazz works in tunes..one of the factors that brought me to playing music
    It was a shame the Jazz Mobile finally stopped a few years ago. FYI they mainly had kids as students, but anyone could participate if they wanted. Today the Jazz Residencies are picking up where the Jazz Mobile left off and clubs and other venues all over the world are hosting residencies my many Jazz musicians. He's a video of Steve Coleman talking about his residencies.


  8. #8

    David Bakker Bebop Patterns 6 - 20

    Hi,

    Three more videos with David Baker patterns from 6 to 20.
    https://mpcsouza10.wixsite.com/practcingarchives/video

    Cheers!

  9. #9
    This is a smart project Mauricio. Keep it up brother!

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the thread, Mauricio.

    I have always enjoyed hearing music fragments, lines, and patterns. When I hear it, I am normally able to imagine in my mind a complete solo based on their themes. I never could get them into my fingers, but they make nice little ideas to hum while I go through my daily toils and duties.

  11. #11
    Nice,


    I really encourage you to try to play some patterns, as they are a good way to approach to the sound of major scales.

    Cheers to Texas!
    (RIP SRV).

    Maurício

  12. #12
    Five more patterns.

    https://mpcsouza10.wixsite.com/practcingarchives/video

    Cheers!
    Maurício Souza

  13. #13
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    Well done, Maurício.

    I guess it is very possible to memorise every pattern in these books, and still not be able to improvise BeBop. So, how do you integrate them into your improv? And don't you feel a little dishonest when you slot one of these licks into a solo? No criticism implied. I'm just wondering how you use this stuff without it sounding contrived.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Well done, Maurício.

    I guess it is very possible to memorise every pattern in these books, and still not be able to improvise BeBop. So, how do you integrate them into your improv? And don't you feel a little dishonest when you slot one of these licks into a solo? No criticism implied. I'm just wondering how you use this stuff without it sounding contrived.
    I understand your questions, Rob but, my guess is this: if you study this kind of stuff enough to make them happen in your solos (and not just on a single tune/key) then you learned a great deal.. I mean, if one can naturally add these lines into just any place they want then the line itself becomes secondary and it's the language that prevails.

    A bit like a well known folk story in my country... the stone soup: Stone Soup - Wikipedia

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Well done, Maurício.

    I guess it is very possible to memorise every pattern in these books, and still not be able to improvise BeBop. So, how do you integrate them into your improv? And don't you feel a little dishonest when you slot one of these licks into a solo? No criticism implied. I'm just wondering how you use this stuff without it sounding contrived.

    I don't think they are intended to be memorized as licks, but to be used more as germs of ideas to them work on expanding melodically and rhythmically. Like I've said in other posts that a horn player can take one little pattern and turn it into a day's practice altering the notes and rhythm, then working it over many types of chords and situation. Which is like improvising on the bandstand creating a motif and working, then another motif and worked.

  16. #16
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    I understand. Like learning any language, imitation is a necessary step, and it helps to have started at a young age...alas.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    I understand. Like learning any language, imitation is a necessary step, and it helps to have started at a young age...alas.

    That's why kids learn more and faster, they learn a nugget of info then experiment with it to discover all that can and can't be done with it. Kids don't get discouraged and are willing to fail a hundred times in order to figure something out. Adults are afraid to make mistakes and get frustrated if they don't get something in a short time. What's the old saying, Miles must of said it, he said everything <grin>... If you aren't making mistakes you're not trying hard enough. Robben Ford told a nervous new band member after a gig.... If you're not making mistakes you're not having fun. Gigs are about having fun!

  18. #18
    Hi,


    Plus 10 patterns from David Baker Bebop Era 101 patterns, going out to 101 target...

    https://mpcsouza10.wixsite.com/practcingarchives/video

    Cheers, Maurício

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    I understand. Like learning any language, imitation is a necessary step, and it helps to have started at a young age...alas.

    Right. Then comes assimilation, and then innovation (or at least independent creation). One needn't worry about being 100% original in every improvised musical utterance. It's darned likely that anything one can think of has already been played, or something very close to it.

    Scales and arpeggios are good for warming up. They should be learned, mastered, maintained. But they are NOT the jazz language.

    Constant listening is essential too of course, but if you want the jazz language to "come out of you" when you express yourself extemporaneously you had better work hard to get it into yourself first. Think of it like a database. You can't get anything out of a database that wasn't first put in, and preferably in a thoughtful and organized way.

    For an analogy, one can study boxing, they can watch boxing, maybe even coach boxing, but if they don't practice boxing they had better not step into the ring with George Foreman.

    So, if you want to be a jazz improviser then you have to work very hard on the jazz language itself - in a direct fashion. That means jazz patterns - yes. That means jazz solos - yes. Can you just practice one as opposed to both? Sure, but there's no need for that and patterns are typically much easier to play than master solos. Trying to start with those can stop a beginning jazzer cold in his tracks, and turn him into quitter 10,000,001.


    My two cents anyway.

  20. #20
    Another note on getting the most out of jazz pattern learning.

    While it would be ideal to learn your patterns in 12 keys, one may be better served by learning an additional pattern or three.

    So, apply your patterns to at least 4 keys that traverse the fretboard. One key way down low, one way up high, and a couple in between. They should also be applied to at least two strings sets (starting strings).


    Cheers.

  21. #21
    Yes, as in other languages ??you should start by imitating, copying, learning. And it's fun to keep track of videos from this repertoire. Thanks!

  22. #22
    You are right jazzstdnt. This is my intention, but the videos are just for registration. I intend to complete them in C in two octaves and go ahead in the book. Thank you!

  23. #23
    Hi,

    Five more patterns. Enjoy!

    https://mpcsouza10.wixsite.com/practcingarchives/video


    Cheers, Maurício

  24. #24

    David Baker Patterns 41- 50

    Hi,

    Patterns 41 - 50.

    https://mpcsouza10.wixsite.com/practcingarchives/video



    Cheers!
    Maurício Souza

  25. #25
    Nice job man, keep a goin'!

  26. #26

    David Baker Patterns 51 - 60

    Hi,

    Patterns 41 - 50.

    https://mpcsouza10.wixsite.com/practcingarchives/video



    Cheers!
    Maurício Souza

  27. #27

    David Baker Patterns 61- 70

    Hello,

    Patterns 61 - 70!

    https://mpcsouza10.wixsite.com/practcingarchives/video



    Cheers,

    Maurício Souza

  28. #28

    Thanks!

    Hi Mauricio,

    Just discovered this thread. Thanks so much for this! Really appreciated.

    Cheers,
    Gavin

  29. #29
    I bought this book about a month ago after seeing this thread and have been practicing the first 100 patterns. I like to play a pattern then play it in a different position in the same key, then start playing it over a cycle of key changes with iReel. It's a good way of internalising the patterns as well as improving interval recognition across the fretboard and understanding how to link 251s together, as long as you concentrate on what scale degrees you are playing over each chord as you go.

    I've found that a lot of the patterns have become very familiar to me, so that when I just start cycling through 251s in different keys with a backing track snatches of these patterns naturally come out, but I'm also just able to link lines in my head more fluidly. It's a very satisfying process.

  30. #30
    Hi Mackie,

    You seem to do it just the right and highly recommended way. I would be happy to do that! Good job!
    Soon I will put the next 10 patterns and so on. As soon as I can do it!

    Thank you!
    Maurício

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