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  1. #801
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Week 18. Day 5. "Angel Eyes" in D minor. This should be called Angle Eyes because it's very angular to my ears.
    This would make a very interesting challenge, to take something and play it for mood, to bring out the unexpected aspects of a chord. If you have a minor chord, you have two major chords within there, more if you want to toy with different scales, and y'know, they're there for you. You can also cross the bar line for great effect, especially at the speeds we're now using. This tempo allows you to work a brighter major type sound over a minor chord and that "blurring" effect actually just sounds like upper tensions. Also, on the dominant sections, you'll find more flowing uses of the Symmetrical diminished chord and you can just play them over the dominant chord structure. I know it seems "wrong" or counter intuitive, to defy the changes so blatantly, but as we increase speed, you're not playing for chord detail as much as opening up your note palette for "washes" of sound that fit over the changes.
    If you're in an aolean -VI type situation, playing major from the 3rd of the chord can really inform the change.
    If you're in a dorian -II part of the tune, that lydian on the 3rd of that chord is going to bring you out of the realm of cliche II-7 sounds.
    This is a great opportunity to play around with and discover moods within moods, break old habits and uncover those other sounds that lurk beneath the surface of the things you've come to be comfortable with (and fixed to).
    Also once those angular dominant changes are put down in the ear of the listener (by comping or backing), there's no need to actually play anything. I know the books say you play the 3rd and the b7 on a 7 chord, but it's THERE already. YOU create a line that hints at a sense of movement and learn to thing dynamic line, whether or not you want to make it angular.
    I'd listen to Paul Desmond, and he'd made his own note choices that were SO him, and he often opted for the unexpected angle on a tune. That 9 on a minor chord, that comes so easily if you are thinking, say, major 7th from the 3rd, well it's an entirely different sound he owned.

    It's your solo. Look for ways not to be trapped by the changes. The notes are there.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #802
    Week 18 Day 5.
    Realizing that the real strength of this program is in learning to hear new sounds on the fly. If I can hear it, I can play it. These 18 weeks have been a steady reenforcement of that ear to hand connection. Breaking the cycle of letting thinking get in the way.
    I'll have to work with this Saturday. Maybe this is the real point of these 20 weeks for me. I thought it was about moving my fingers faster but it's really about hearing faster. And you can't do that without serious time on the instrument.
    On to day 6 tomorrow

  4. #803
    Week 18 Day 6 Saturday
    Angel Eyes, minor and dominant sounds study
    Tempo to your limits
    eighths and triplets with right and left hand articulations
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-04-09-9-47-41-pm-png

  5. #804

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    Week 18. Day 6. Angle Eyes in A minor. Long week. A bit sleep deprived. I stumbled my way through the first ten minutes. The second and third sessions were better. Per JBN's great advice, I really tried to let go and make this my improvisation. There were some very enjoyable, successful moments. Sometimes I felt like I was floating over the changes too vaguely, so I would ground myself with 3rds and 7ths again. Those last couple measures of the form always sound odd to me. Hard for me to make that musical. Wow. I just realized I only have 2 weeks left. It will be interesting to see what transpires next. On to week 19!

  6. #805
    WEEK 19!!! I can't believe we're nearly to the bell lap!
    This week is a review, polish and really "Musicization" of these projects. That means with the integration of eighth note techniques and linear speed executed through a combination of left and right hand techniques, we can really begin to put together a toolbox of sophisticated techniques, combined with projects that present many of the fundamental structural and harmonic challenges in the jazz repertoire.
    So Day 1. Monday
    Speed to your edge of thought, hearing and movement.
    Project 4-A ATTY in Ab. Modulations, key and tonal shifts and the HR smattering of dominant approaches.

    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-04-11-10-39-36-pm-png
    Monday ATTYA in Ab
    Tuesday ATTYA in Eb
    Wednesday Blues for Alice in C
    Thursday Blues for Alice in G
    Friday Modal Madness F dorian
    Saturday Modal Madness in C dorian
    Here's Monday's Project:
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-project-4-attya-ab-png

  7. #806

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    Week 19. Day 1. ATTYA in Ab. I decided to get a jump on the week after taking yesterday off from Super Chops and focusing on other guitar pursuits. It was nice to jump back in this week with a familiar tune, albeit with Howard's cool and sometimes slightly eccentric changes. I continue to try to push myself with the tempos, but not to the point where my mind can't keep up and I'm unable to play anything musical. I also try with each pass of the form to get off book and really follow my ear. Following my ear often is the best way for me to navigate some of Howard's surprising dominant alterations/subs, rather than slavishly chasing after them.

  8. #807
    Week 19. Preparation for Monday and the week ahead
    I'm working on specific phrases or "licks" combining adjacent scale notes with HO and PU that lead to a wide leap or slide. This is a challenge to pull off (ha ha) but well worth it. This disciplined shaping of linear techniques is really expanding my sound.
    So I have scale notes and between two adjacent strings I can get lots of permutations. I practice them and immediately after a run, a leap to a note either two or more strings over or slide up or down the neck where the line continues in time. I feel like I'm truly "authoring" or owning some very unique sounds, and this new technique flows very smoothly with left and right hand coordination.
    I am looking forward to applying these to a tonal context. If feels like a lexicon breakthrough and I've been playing with this for hours tonight. SO much fun.
    Then I can hear things like this in other guitarists' sounds and I think AHA! That's how it's done.
    Gonna be a good two weeks!

  9. #808
    Week 19 Day 1.
    Great workout. It's all coming together. These weeks of constant daily workouts for the hands, ear and ideas is starting to taste like soup. All the pieces are coming together.
    Gotta say the pieces and quirky obstacle dominant passages and all are feeling second nature. With both hands being very active I can hear the upcoming passages and easily shift to them. This lets me take the attention off of anything distracting (like the page, the changes or the world) and play the piece. It's almost as if I'm watching a familiar landscape go by, I can decide what I want to do with it, if I want to run a lyrical line, or a fancy figure with embellished chord tones, or make a melodic commentary off of that idea I played 4 bars ago, or even playing counterpoint.
    If I could have seen ahead 18 weeks ago to find this within my abilities, I'd have been pretty excited. I can say that I'm in the payoff part of this course right now and it's feeling really nice.
    I'm also comping with much less cumbersome chords, doing all I want with dyads and triads with the occasional bass accent obligato.
    I worked with Just Friends and I'll Remember You as my "tunes" today and what I'm doing with them, well I'll just say I'm pleased.

  10. #809
    Week 19 Day 2 Tuesday's Project
    Suggested study piece Project 4-B ATTYA in Eb
    Speed set at the edge of the comfort zone
    All left and right hand techniques available
    Steady eighths and triplets.
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-project-4-b-attya-eb-png

  11. #810

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    Week 19. Day 2. ATTYA in Eb. JBN's progress reports are inspiring. I wish I could say I'm having breakthroughs like him. Not that I don't see progress. I certainly do. I find myself playing more freely through the form while still outlining the changes, especially Howard's special sauce changes. I think what I'm struggling with a bit is the "Super Chops" physical portion of the program. My tempos aren't nearly as fast as Howard's target tempos, yet still I get tripped up with my inability to shred. If I dialed it way back, obviously I'd have a lot more time to really navigate my way through the changes. Now this is going to contradict what I just wrote, but sometimes when I get to my top speed of the night on pass #3, it feels like I'm able to play through the form a bit more effortlessly. Or maybe I just think I am. I certainly don't want to skate ambiguously over the changes for the sake of speed. Anyway. Onward and upward!

  12. #811
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    I think what I'm struggling with a bit is the "Super Chops" physical portion of the program. My tempos aren't nearly as fast as Howard's target tempos, yet still I get tripped up with my inability to shred.
    This brings up a very interesting and unexpected line of thought for me. I'm curious, do you think your linear thinking has changed as we've increased in tempo?
    I used to think there were certain parameters of soloing and they're certainly discussed a lot: scales, arpeggios, approach tones, and those related things. I can have a real awareness of those things and at lower tempos, they make up a lot of what constitutes my decision making process. It's what I think of as the lexicon of slow to medium tempo.
    One thing I noticed about speeding up, and being able to hear more ideas as I became more proficient, is how horn players change the emphasis from definable lines to a lot of intricate figures that defy identifying at high speeds. I'd often be left with an impression, an impression of how well things go together, but not what notes make up those constructions. "How do they DO that?" and more importantly, how do I change my thinking to practice larger lines at high speed.
    So what I've begun working on are what I see as "micro figures" or clusters of notes that give an impression yet aren't necessarily stand alone lines in of themselves. These micro figures as I've been working them out, can be changed on the fly in subtle ways, and I'm collecting groups of them as I practice them. In the way that working with sketching or line drawing in the graphic art world shows great detail and subtlety in a smaller area, brush craft and learning to paint with paints cover larger areas. It's a matter of scale...and scale, ha ha.

    For instance, at slower tempos, I might be thinking of a melodic idea, and use the chord tones either as arpeggios, scales or triads to convey the substance or the meaning through a line, where I might play do, fa, sol, la, do... now each note can be the focus of a group of notes I'd practice, (ex fa: I can play a note above, a scale note below, chromatic approach and then fa) a micro figure of above and below. For more angular, I use more chromaticism. For more melodic, use more scale tones. The point is at high speed, this above and below micro figure is FAST, especially when using Hammer Ons and Pull Offs, and it coveys a brushstroke with one gesture (that I've practiced and catalogued.) Follow this with an approach note to my next sol note, and I can really convey a feeling of movement, move at very high speed, let the left hand do the articulation and with some practice I'm playing very fluid lines.

    This is the way I'm starting to hear/play upper tempos. It's also a LOT of fun to be playing so fast and decisively with shifts becoming much more natural out of necessity.

    It takes a bit of work to come up with ideas, and to internalize them through practice, but for me, a new micro figure every other day, I've already got enough little devices, brush strokes that when put together, they make some tasty unexpected licks.

    Just thought I'd share this.

  13. #812
    Week 19, day 3. Wednesday's project.
    Suggested Project 5-A Blues for Alice in C
    The diatonic study
    Tempo at the upper end of your comfort zone
    Using steady eighths and triplets, articulating with the left hand as well as picking.
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-project-5-blues-alice-c-png

  14. #813

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    Week 19. Day 3. Blues For Alice in C. Tonight was pretty similar to the last number of practice sessions. The first pass is a getting to know you attempt. The second and third passes I'm able to get off book and be more free with my playing. Thanks, JBN for the great post above about playing in clusters at faster speeds. To some degree, I think instinctively I'm trying to do that. Even though I know your tempos are faster than mine. As always, I'm conscience of not drifting over the changes too much for the sake of speed. Not that I'm implying you're doing that by any means. Anyway, it was a good night. Time to get some more playing in before bed!

  15. #814

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    It’s been a while since I checked in, so I thought I’d pop into the forum with a progress report. As you may know, I’m a few weeks behind everyone, having started late, so right now I’m in the middle of Week 17. I’m proud of myself having made it this far without any breaks or interruptions in the practice schedule.

    Back in Week 12 I hit a real plateau, and was stuck, tempo-wise, at a range of between 108 and 114 for nearly 3 weeks. I could play triplet bursts at faster tempos but trying to maintain constant triplets at faster tempos for any length of time was beyond my abilities. It was frustrating, but I kept at it, and by the end of Week 15, I had creeped up to 122bpm, and the plateau seemed to have passed. That said, I’m still playing at the very edge of my abilities these days, and these faster tempos do not seem comfortable yet.

    Currently I’m at 131 bpm, and I crank the metronome up 1 beat per day. For my first 10-minute session, I actually play through the tune at 1 bpm slower than the previous day’s tempo. The second pass through, I play the tune at the same tempo as the previous day; and the third time through, I play it at 1 bpm faster than the previous day. The progress is slow, but steady. If I don’t hit any other significant plateaus, then I should make it to 150+ bpm by the end of Week 20.

    A few observations I’ve made:

    1) Clearly, triplets at 131 bpm are not ‘super-chops’ by any stretch of the imagination. It might be easy to be disillusioned with the HRSC program because of this, but that might be looking at it the wrong way. If I look at it strictly from the perspective of what I’ve achieved compared to where I started 17 weeks ago, then I’d have to say it was time well spent – I could not have played triplets at 131 for 10 minutes straight back when I started. Now I can.

    2) You get out of this book what you put into it. For this time around, all I was interested in, and focused on, was improving my picking speed and accuracy. The next time I go through the book, I’m planning to focus on outlining chord tones and arpeggios. I see this book as a template for practicing whatever concepts you wish to apply to it. It is a procedurally rigid structure that is substantively fluid to the needs of the practicer.

    3) I definitely want to do this again, and soon. I like that I’ve gotten into the SuperChops habit, and making it part of my daily practice schedule can only be beneficial. Does anyone want to go through the book with me again – say, starting either in June or July? Let me know.

  16. #815

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    Quote Originally Posted by Socraticaster
    It’s been a while since I checked in, so I thought I’d pop into the forum with a progress report. As you may know, I’m a few weeks behind everyone, having started late, so right now I’m in the middle of Week 17. I’m proud of myself having made it this far without any breaks or interruptions in the practice schedule.

    Back in Week 12 I hit a real plateau, and was stuck, tempo-wise, at a range of between 108 and 114 for nearly 3 weeks. I could play triplet bursts at faster tempos but trying to maintain constant triplets at faster tempos for any length of time was beyond my abilities. It was frustrating, but I kept at it, and by the end of Week 15, I had creeped up to 122bpm, and the plateau seemed to have passed. That said, I’m still playing at the very edge of my abilities these days, and these faster tempos do not seem comfortable yet.

    Currently I’m at 131 bpm, and I crank the metronome up 1 beat per day. For my first 10-minute session, I actually play through the tune at 1 bpm slower than the previous day’s tempo. The second pass through, I play the tune at the same tempo as the previous day; and the third time through, I play it at 1 bpm faster than the previous day. The progress is slow, but steady. If I don’t hit any other significant plateaus, then I should make it to 150+ bpm by the end of Week 20.

    A few observations I’ve made:

    1) Clearly, triplets at 131 bpm are not ‘super-chops’ by any stretch of the imagination. It might be easy to be disillusioned with the HRSC program because of this, but that might be looking at it the wrong way. If I look at it strictly from the perspective of what I’ve achieved compared to where I started 17 weeks ago, then I’d have to say it was time well spent – I could not have played triplets at 131 for 10 minutes straight back when I started. Now I can.

    2) You get out of this book what you put into it. For this time around, all I was interested in, and focused on, was improving my picking speed and accuracy. The next time I go through the book, I’m planning to focus on outlining chord tones and arpeggios. I see this book as a template for practicing whatever concepts you wish to apply to it. It is a procedurally rigid structure that is substantively fluid to the needs of the practicer.

    3) I definitely want to do this again, and soon. I like that I’ve gotten into the SuperChops habit, and making it part of my daily practice schedule can only be beneficial. Does anyone want to go through the book with me again – say, starting either in June or July? Let me know.
    Great post. I dropped out of the regular routine a while back, but have adopted the basic template of soloing slowly over changes 3x for 10 mins as a way to help internalize new tunes. While the rigor of the program reaps benefits I just don’t have the availability these days to stick with it. Some day I will do it again though.

  17. #816
    Week 19 Day 4 Thursday
    Suggested project 5-B Blues for Alice in G
    Diatonic and dominant study
    Speed at the edge of your comfort zone
    Eighths and triplets using right and left hand articulations
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-project-5-b-blues-alice-g-png

  18. #817
    Week 19 Wednesday
    In my search for interesting lines that can be tactile-y organized, today I started a way of creating lines based on strict Hammer-Ons and Pull-Offs. Starting on any note (today I began on the 7th string, I'm a 7 string player) I'd pick the note and use a hammer on or pull off. On the next string up, I'd alternate (if I hammered on, then this string I'd pull off). This lets me essentially sweep pick with alternating HO and PO. When I came across a combination that worked well, I'd mark it, then alternate it for different chord qualities.
    I could even change chords mid sweep across the fingerboard and the up and down texture of the line is maintained.
    As I was doing this, I was reminded of a column Howard Roberts once wrote for Guitar Player magazine. One of the columns that month talked about playing shapes across the neck, and seeing what shakes out. This exercise I was doing today certainly makes some cool sounds, and I end the sweep with a lyrical ending and resolution and it all makes sense.
    Certainly makes pushing the speed easier.

  19. #818

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    Week 19. Day 4. Blues for Alice in G. This was one of the best nights I've had in awhile. Socraticaster's post motivated me to push myself a bit more. Thank you! Of course these changes are more easily negotiated. It's simpler to get off book right away and really let loose. I was also concentrating on longer phrases over bar lines to avoid boxing myself in. It felt very good. Tonight all the hard work seemed to pay off. We'll see what tomorrow brings. Time to get back on the guitar for the rest of the evening!

  20. #819
    Quote Originally Posted by Donplaysguitar
    At the risk of being an interloper, I bought this book years ago and am not sure if i own it anymore but..

    How is this book working for you guys? Is it what you expected/hoped for? Would you recommend it to others? Anything you would add, change, or delete?
    Quote Originally Posted by Socraticaster

    A few observations I’ve made:

    1) Clearly, triplets at 131 bpm are not ‘super-chops’ by any stretch of the imagination. It might be easy to be disillusioned with the HRSC program because of this, but that might be looking at it the wrong way. If I look at it strictly from the perspective of what I’ve achieved compared to where I started 17 weeks ago, then I’d have to say it was time well spent – I could not have played triplets at 131 for 10 minutes straight back when I started. Now I can.

    2) You get out of this book what you put into it. For this time around, all I was interested in, and focused on, was improving my picking speed and accuracy. The next time I go through the book, I’m planning to focus on outlining chord tones and arpeggios. I see this book as a template for practicing whatever concepts you wish to apply to it. It is a procedurally rigid structure that is substantively fluid to the needs of the practicer.

    3) I definitely want to do this again, and soon. I like that I’ve gotten into the SuperChops habit, and making it part of my daily practice schedule can only be beneficial. Does anyone want to go through the book with me again – say, starting either in June or July? Let me know.
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    It's simpler to get off book right away and really let loose. I was also concentrating on longer phrases over bar lines to avoid boxing myself in. It felt very good.
    Now that we're getting to a point that I can really see the payoff and the method to this madness, I can make some observations about Mr. Fumble's question posed a little while back.
    There's a LOT that goes into developing facility on the instrument (chops) and this book takes you from where you are and pushes you to the next level.
    It's a big commitment, 20 weeks of dedicated concentrated work on the instrument. Truth is, this kind of dedication is what separates those who go on to master the instrument and those who speculate on what it would be like.
    Jazz improvisation is a complicated process of compositional awareness (theory), kinesthetics (fingers), navigation (fretboard awareness), ear awareness (how much you hear so you can know where you can go) and semantics (making your notes mean something). These things you bring into the program beforehand. Howard Roberts makes the assumption that you have some ability to play and the more you have, the more you'll come out with.

    If you're still working on playing a melodic line over a I chord and not yet able to connect it with what the II chord coming up next means, then you'll meet your limitations as the speed increases. But a huge part of this program is self diagnosis. It shows up real world limitations, and with that, you can put aside the delusions of what it means to play, and get down to nailing all the pieces in place. That's why I went through it several times. Each time I learned that speed is an integrative process. What I need to PLAY faster and IN TIME, is total ease with all the parts. That is not in the book.

    Speaking of the book in specifics, it does a really good job of covering pieces that address diatonic situations, diatonic with turnarounds, key changes, speed differences, extended chordal vamps (modal), minor tonalities, a wide variety of keys, chordal arrangements in different keys, several well used and tricky dominant chord situations, and the most important thing: The elusive product of good, hard, unforgiving and relentless WORK.

    That's why I started this during the pandemic. I knew people would be locked up, and I knew people would be losing touch with their instruments, and I knew people would have blamed all sorts of things for not being the musicians they really have within themselves. So with just time, a good comprehensive guide and the ALL important support of each other, we might emerge from the COVID lockdown as musicians we never imagined we could be. I do think this program is much better with the support of others. We encounter things we think are our own obstacles, and we think "I was not meant to be a jazz player" but with others we say "Oh yeah? You too?" and someone might say "Hey I began to see it this way..." and it's just a problem we can solve on the way up the tempo ladder.

    I see this as a good program that is, like working in music, teaches you that making music is the greatest teacher. It brings up questions and answers them. I took this template and at one time worked on one piece a week this way, slower to faster, no excuses and no endless speculation on what I might be if I only put the time into the guitar (instead of being a KILLER typist on the computer, or a KILLER burger flipper, or a KILLER driver on the streets from hours behind the wheel...).

    What I might change? I might introduce more tunes, more harmonic concepts, like a "I'll Remember You" or All Of Me" dominant exercise, or introduce more modern harmonic possibilities, but all those things can be done if you unplug a specific Project and insert a lead sheet you make on your own.
    I did that with a few examples here. It was a great experience.
    Super Chops also doesn't do much for the comping side of things. The voicings are cumbersome and sometimes, to my ear, get in the way. I recorded my own dyads and triads voicings on the given changes. Much better, and it made me a much better soloist and comper.
    At first I thought the steady eighths were not a good way to go, but now in week 19, I have facility that I wouldn't have gotten had I allowed myself the "space to retreat to" through rests. It's brutal but I can see.
    I don't play with a pick so the picking emphasis is not so hot, but adapting what he says to do, that's become a key for me to developing my own way around the challenges each project poses.

    I think most of all, it's a terrific diagnostic tool. It shows me so many things that trip me up in real life playing. And it says "I'm not gonna tell you what you have to do", but when you do the work outside of the hour a day, then you come back next day, or next week, or next time around, and you are doing things you never knew were even things you could imagine. It's a way of confronting yourself. And it doesn't forgive.
    If you want to learn your own abilities, you have to find your own limitations and push them out of the way. Jazz is about the music, the pieces and what you compose with them. Super Chops knows this and I think it's a really good way to address the things you MUST know to play in real time.
    My opinion anyway.

  21. #820

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    Now that we're getting to a point that I can really see the payoff and the method to this madness, I can make some observations about Mr. Fumble's question posed a little while back.
    There's a LOT that goes into developing facility on the instrument (chops) and this book takes you from where you are and pushes you to the next level.
    It's a big commitment, 20 weeks of dedicated concentrated work on the instrument. Truth is, this kind of dedication is what separates those who go on to master the instrument and those who speculate on what it would be like.
    Jazz improvisation is a complicated process of compositional awareness (theory), kinesthetics (fingers), navigation (fretboard awareness), ear awareness (how much you hear so you can know where you can go) and semantics (making your notes mean something). These things you bring into the program beforehand. Howard Roberts makes the assumption that you have some ability to play and the more you have, the more you'll come out with.

    If you're still working on playing a melodic line over a I chord and not yet able to connect it with what the II chord coming up next means, then you'll meet your limitations as the speed increases. But a huge part of this program is self diagnosis. It shows up real world limitations, and with that, you can put aside the delusions of what it means to play, and get down to nailing all the pieces in place. That's why I went through it several times. Each time I learned that speed is an integrative process. What I need to PLAY faster and IN TIME, is total ease with all the parts. That is not in the book.

    Speaking of the book in specifics, it does a really good job of covering pieces that address diatonic situations, diatonic with turnarounds, key changes, speed differences, extended chordal vamps (modal), minor tonalities, a wide variety of keys, chordal arrangements in different keys, several well used and tricky dominant chord situations, and the most important thing: The elusive product of good, hard, unforgiving and relentless WORK.

    That's why I started this during the pandemic. I knew people would be locked up, and I knew people would be losing touch with their instruments, and I knew people would have blamed all sorts of things for not being the musicians they really have within themselves. So with just time, a good comprehensive guide and the ALL important support of each other, we might emerge from the COVID lockdown as musicians we never imagined we could be. I do think this program is much better with the support of others. We encounter things we think are our own obstacles, and we think "I was not meant to be a jazz player" but with others we say "Oh yeah? You too?" and someone might say "Hey I began to see it this way..." and it's just a problem we can solve on the way up the tempo ladder.

    I see this as a good program that is, like working in music, teaches you that making music is the greatest teacher. It brings up questions and answers them. I took this template and at one time worked on one piece a week this way, slower to faster, no excuses and no endless speculation on what I might be if I only put the time into the guitar (instead of being a KILLER typist on the computer, or a KILLER burger flipper, or a KILLER driver on the streets from hours behind the wheel...).

    What I might change? I might introduce more tunes, more harmonic concepts, like a "I'll Remember You" or All Of Me" dominant exercise, or introduce more modern harmonic possibilities, but all those things can be done if you unplug a specific Project and insert a lead sheet you make on your own.
    I did that with a few examples here. It was a great experience.
    Super Chops also doesn't do much for the comping side of things. The voicings are cumbersome and sometimes, to my ear, get in the way. I recorded my own dyads and triads voicings on the given changes. Much better, and it made me a much better soloist and comper.
    At first I thought the steady eighths were not a good way to go, but now in week 19, I have facility that I wouldn't have gotten had I allowed myself the "space to retreat to" through rests. It's brutal but I can see.
    I don't play with a pick so the picking emphasis is not so hot, but adapting what he says to do, that's become a key for me to developing my own way around the challenges each project poses.

    I think most of all, it's a terrific diagnostic tool. It shows me so many things that trip me up in real life playing. And it says "I'm not gonna tell you what you have to do", but when you do the work outside of the hour a day, then you come back next day, or next week, or next time around, and you are doing things you never knew were even things you could imagine. It's a way of confronting yourself. And it doesn't forgive.
    If you want to learn your own abilities, you have to find your own limitations and push them out of the way. Jazz is about the music, the pieces and what you compose with them. Super Chops knows this and I think it's a really good way to address the things you MUST know to play in real time.
    My opinion anyway.
    I hope you’ll give some thought to the idea of collecting your writings from the various Superchops sessions into a companion guide.

  22. #821

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    Quote Originally Posted by wzpgsr
    I hope you’ll give some thought to the idea of collecting your writings from the various Superchops sessions into a companion guide.
    That's a fabulous idea, wzpgsr! I totally concur! Thank you as always, JBN!

  23. #822

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    Week 19. Day 5. Modal Madness Part I. It was a very good session tonight. It's amazing how more freely I play over these changes than the first time around. JBN's post above was wonderful. So many great, salient points. I sometimes wonder if I'm missing the boat a bit by not doing constant 8th notes or 8th note triplets. For the most part I am, but I still create some space to play phrases and ideas. Anyway, that's been a continual question in the back of my mind during this program. Maybe if I do the course again, which I may very well do, I'll religiously stick to the steady barrage of picking!

  24. #823
    Week 19 Day 5 Friday
    Project 6-A Modal Madness in F
    Speed to the edge of your comfort zone
    Steady eighths and triplets in the right hand augmented by left hand articulations
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-project-6-modal-f-dorian-png

  25. #824
    Expanding your dominant chord facility
    Symmetrical scales part 2. The whole tone scale.
    We've come to see that in making a solo, there's a breathing process that puts tension, or breath intake, with a sense of purposeful resolution or breath release.
    If you're just playing the changes, or the notes you've been taught or just running the scales and arpeggios, you're not fully investing your note resources in building meaning, emotion and a journey with those resources.
    So you see 7th chords, and you encounter pretty much everything else in conveying your story. Breathe in, breathe out.
    At its most rudimentary and essential is the dominant chord, its unique 3 and b7 relationship. That's the bite your remember. But being a slave to that "bite" is really limiting. So as a lifetime's process, we can learn to expand that essence into and through the use of other scales. Altered scales of many varieties derived from the melodic minor and harmonic minor scales; we've encountered a few. REALLY get to know them so you can play something different every time you play. Set up motifs with these scales and carry those motifs over the bar lines into the diatonic resolutions; it'll impart a sense of unity. Learn to set up a contrast between the dominant and diatonic sections of the piece. Find the opportunity to break out of notes and into a picture of interest.

    Symmetrical scales are a unique take on the dominant harmonic function. They don't really FIT within the given harmony of diatonic, and there's the strength. They give you juice in the "wrongness" and they give you real meaning in the resolution.
    The Whole Tone Scale is made up of every other note of the chromatic scale. You get your 3 and b7, but you also get a 2 (9), a #4, an augmented 5th too. Run any combination of notes and you can move that combination to any degree and it'll create motiv that always creates tension. This is the sound of Monk. This is the sound of Debussey too.
    If you open it up to wider leaps, you'll start to get some really angular sounds.

    Suggestion: Find the pattern on your fingerboard first. Find the sound of the scale.
    Then take a root note and find out how the other notes sound against it, either as an interval or a dyad.
    Start creating phrases and then resolve them to the target chord.
    Build up facility and use in any situation where a 7th is called for.
    Take a phrase, and move it up a whole step. You'll get movement and it's easy.
    Play around. There's a LOT in there.
    Have fun!
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-04-16-6-35-42-am-png Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-04-16-6-35-12-am-png

  26. #825
    Week 19 Day 6 Saturday
    Project 6-B of the recap review section
    Modal Madness C dorian and more
    Speed to the upper edge of your comfort zone
    Left and right hand note articulations
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-project-6-b-modal-c-dorian-png

  27. #826

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    Week 19. Day 6. Modal Madness in Bb/C dorian. Tonight I decided to push myself with the tempos. Playing steady 8th notes isn't an issue, but trying to have room for a run of triplets was challenging. I got up to 145 bpm. I just can't execute picked triplets at that tempo for more than a quick burst or two. It was a good session, but towards the end I started developing some tension and tightness on the right side of my neck. That quickly reminded me that my physical well being is far more important than Super Chops. Anyway, I can't believe I'm about to embark on week 20!

  28. #827
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    I just can't execute picked triplets at that tempo for more than a quick burst or two. It was a good session, but towards the end I started developing some tension and tightness on the right side of my neck. !
    Back off on the stressful tight playing! Good posture, neck at an upward angle. Stretch and warm up. Know when to stop (the hardest). Take care!

    When I took up playing fretless guitar, it changed my playing completely; in a good way. I found myself shifting a LOT more, and even an arpeggio going up across the neck, I would shift so each note was under a strong finger. I found that this way of playing, of seeing, of thinking, of navigating opened up my playing to a lyrical style, a necessity for shifting and then an ease of shifting that became a natural part of my line making. It ALSO made it easy to create enclosures around any note, and to shift into tritone subs REALLY easily.
    I didn't realize until the week when HR opened up HO, PU and shifts just how much these tools of shifting are significantly different from position playing.
    If you try more shifting, you can accomplish greater shifts, avoid awkward stretches and "shift" your way around parts of the scale that, because they're not coming from a strong hand position, can wind up not flowing as smoothly. Ornamental enclosures also wind up fitting into triplet timing and because they function as melodic ornaments, they also become rhythmic ornaments too, so your phrases have a nice continuity of texture and surprise to them.
    That's how it's worked for me, anyway.
    Hope it works out, and take care of those hands!

  29. #828
    Starting WEEK 20! The final week of the Super Chops course.
    Before I even post the agenda for the upcoming final week, I'd like to get any impressions, comments, observations and any comments from anyone who's even attempted the Super Chops course, either in these past 19 weeks, or in the past, whether successfully completing the course or if and why you stopped.

    I open this up to any lurkers, or anyone who's been following this thread in part, or in secret, or watching curiously from the sides without actually doing any of the projects with us. I'd like to know what happens with players and students with this kind of piece oriented method over 20 weeks of committed and guided practice.

    For those of us (you) who've taken it this far, what did you think you'd be able to do and what have the results been? What did you hope would be accomplished that you didn't? What unexpected and unanticipated benefits have you had? Knowing what you know now, what would you have done differently? Does this change the way you'll conduct your studies in the future?

    Any input would be very welcome.
    I began this thread with a run through a few years ago. This time was VERY different from the last time. I know so much more about the things that hung me up last time, and I have a much more humble idea about what is needed to actually become a faster more solid soloist (and comper). I'll talk about that more in a separate posting.

    Last week, unbelievable how much has changed in these 20 weeks. I look forward to your feedback. And thank you all for running this marathon with me. Honestly, the questions you've asked, the thought we put into looking at our own playing, my own playing, have given me more practical material, revelations and insight than the years I spent in music school. I drew upon all those years of advice, playing and valuable OJT wisdom in shining a light on our work on these projects.

    Thank you all! And do, please feel absolutely free to post your thoughts in this last week. They are all most welcome!

  30. #829

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    I figured I would chime in after David's/JBN's post. It is amazing that we're approaching week 20. That in and of itself feels like quite an accomplishment. It shows discipline and commitment. I'm proud of myself for sticking with the course through the ups and the downs. I'll probably ramble a bit here as I think back to the journey of Super Chops. I'm sure I'll have more to add in future posts. I'm not entirely certain what I had hoped to get out of the course. I know what attracted me to it was the idea of a tune-based course. In the beginning I really got drawn in. The slower tempos allowed me to not only work on my right hand technique, but also enabled me to navigate Howard's changes. Very quickly I realized that Howard was going to throw some fascinating curve balls my way. I might stumble a bit initially, but each of those challenges allowed for growth and advancement. I also remember making my first recording/video and posting it to this thread. I was quite anxious and self-conscious. But I was met with encouragement and appreciation. Thank you! That positive reinforcement really helped to solidify my commitment to the course. I've acknowledged before that I haven't always adhered to strict, steady and unrelenting picking. Especially when we segued to triplets. But I embraced the athletic nature of the course. Sometimes that wasn't very appealing. I've struggled with finding a balance between constant picking and trying to say something musical. Have I developed Super Chops? No. Are my "chops" any better? Perhaps. I can't really tell. Although I have to imagine my right hand has improved. But I do feel that my overall musicianship has increased. My time feel. My courage to go for those bursts of triplets when often in the past I wouldn't push myself for fear of my technique breaking down along with the musical statement I was trying to make. I guess it's hard for me to determine the difference between myself 19 weeks ago and this evening. But one thing I've particularly enjoyed is knowing I always have an assignment. Some practical thing to do on the guitar. The last few weeks have felt a bit repetitive since we're not tackling new tunes and my tempos haven't gotten that much faster. Part of me is looking forward to completing this next week. But another part of me is a bit sad that this journey I've taken along with my fellow JGF Super Choppers is approaching the end.

  31. #830
    Week 19. Reflecting and looking back.
    Amazing, to look back to December when we began this, and then to 2017 when I last was finishing up the Howard Roberts Super Chops program.
    Wow! It was a different world back then. Darkest winter ever. And nothing but time and the promises I'd made over years of being a better musician. So glad we did this together, guys.
    I've learned TONS this time through.
    I knew that speed has never been a serious point of focus for me, there was always something complicated I was working on and the speed was what it was. But it was never a commitment to developing "chops". As a matter of fact, chops calisthenics seemed the opposite of how I wanted to develop as a soloist. But I had time, and what else was I doing during a pandemic lockdown?

    I came in with some idea, some idea from when I'd done this in 2017, that I wanted to develop a language of sophisticated phrases that I could then bring up in tempo, phrases that utilized harmony and texture I didn't have the patience to really get together.
    In this way, the program was really good. It taught me that there's a big difference between knowing what could be played-and actually playing it.

    You can repeat the mantra "Playing and doing it is the only way to make it happen", but it takes a LOT of inertia to run full steam for 20 weeks. I'm very pleased at what I can do now, with solid time and clarity of thought, that I never imagined I'd have back at week 1. I didn't know, even having run through before, how much is in those 6 pieces, how I could read them completely differently EACH time.

    This time I had a notebook of things to conquer (melodic minor modes, crossing the bar lines, groupings of three or five in a 4 beat bar... and more) so every time I felt something trappingly predictable on the horizon, I came up with strategies to steer clear (wider intervals, shift to new position, create a new motif and work with it, make better phrase endings that dovetailed into the next phrase passage...).

    I also developed an entirely new way of playing that has Pull Offs, Hammer-Ons and slides playing heavily. And that necessitated a more solid fretboard navigation system. The "map" is now stronger than it's ever been.

    I saw clearly that Super Chops means super ears. If I can't hear it I don't play it but if I can hear it fast, I can play it just as fast.
    Hear it.
    Practice so and until I can hear it.
    Think it out, work it out on the fingerboard, teach the fingers, play it and down the road, come to hear it. Then it's ready for improvisation.
    My ear for informed listening has gotten sharper by a big amount. From working at faster speeds and with more intricate things, I can hear, tap into, relate to and take from live performances and recordings to a degree that just wasn't there before. That active-listening conscious-playing feedback loop is a reason alone to go through this course.

    It was driven home that it's Ear, Hand, Navigation and purpose/intent are each legs on the improvisational table; all have to be solid and all have to support the weight evenly.

    The speed of assimilation is not guaranteed. There's a ton of things I want to be able to do (using Symmetrical Diminished in a really creative and inspired way, superimposing harmony within harmony, using chords and dyads in my single line playing at speed) so this course gave me a LOT of homework. Got to write it all down while it's fresh.

    Finally what I'd do differently with the course or with the work. If I had the freedom, I'd make this a 3 hours a day program. 1 hour as it is. 1 hour doing this just as a Super Comps course. And 1 hour "Using space to frame ideas and make them into real rhythmically informed solos.
    I'd see this as part one, then part two is 20 weeks with a tune a week. Same routine. Dotted with sprinkles of ideas to work on like "fertilizer" on the soil we overturn here.

    All in all, yeah this has been great! So glad I did it. I think of where I was 20 weeks ago and now, for the first time, I'm thinking "That wasn't bad. I should've done this a long time ago." I'm on a totally new plateau. Now to see where I can go from here.

    One more week to go. I'll have observations and reflections this week, I'm sure.

  32. #831

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    Week 20! Day 1. Exercise 1B. Wow! Week 20. Pretty amazing. I had an excellent session this morning. I felt smooth, lyrical. I was able to bump up the bpm to 140 without pain. Everything just seemed to flow today. As always, that first 10 minutes helps me to get my footing. But even halfway through the first 10 minutes I was able to let go and really explore not only the fretboard, but ideas. I'm actually about to run out to socially distance with a friend and play some tunes. Hopefully this morning's positive session will translate into good music this afternoon!

  33. #832
    Quote Originally Posted by wzpgsr
    I hope you’ll give some thought to the idea of collecting your writings from the various Superchops sessions into a companion guide.
    I REALLY wish we could have used transporter technology (any Trekkies out there?) and brought you all together to have done this together every day for an hour. There's so much that goes into making this program come alive, a huge part of which is doing it together! And as a side note, transporters have bio-scrubbers that would have removed any COVID contamination in the process. Wouldn't that be handy?

  34. #833

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    I REALLY wish we could have used transporter technology (any Trekkies out there?) and brought you all together to have done this together every day for an hour. There's so much that goes into making this program come alive, a huge part of which is doing it together! And as a side note, transporters have bio-scrubbers that would have removed any COVID contamination in the process. Wouldn't that be handy?
    How does this program work in person? Taking turns comping for each for other in 10 minutes stretches?

  35. #834
    Quote Originally Posted by wzpgsr
    How does this program work in person? Taking turns comping for each for other in 10 minutes stretches?
    Duo is easy to envision
    Trio is solo, comper and bass line. This is really nice because the bass line player really gets to know the form before trying out voicings that work by ear over the form, and when it's time to solo, you're playing with something really in your ear.
    Four people can work where one person lays out. This is not as boring as you'd think, because in listening, you acquire skills, see decisions being made, really hear and be aware of the limitations and pitfalls others are struggling with and it gives a very solid framework of hearing yourself as you're hearing others.
    Listening is a practiced art.
    More than 4, I don't do. It's the point of critical mass at which, unless you're all really good, there's much too much opportunity to zone out and not "be there".
    I have worked with free improvisation groups this way, and with pieces this way too. It's also possible to switch roles each chorus, or every two choruses.
    It might not come as a surprise that learning to go "off book" is much faster this way too.
    It's this experience that I was trying to more closer to when I suggested that you make your own backing tracks, or comp with a metronome before you soloed.

  36. #835
    Week 20. Review of all six project forms in no particular order
    Suggested target speed at the end of the week is 192
    Actual speed for daily projects is up to the individual. This should be set at the fastest tempo where you can hear and execute a coherent and purposeful musical idea.
    Steady eighths and triplet accents with pull offs, hammer ons and slides in both hand attacks.
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-04-18-10-15-37-pm-png
    Monday Project 1-B Cherokee in Db
    Tuesday Project 4-B ATTYA in Eb
    Wednesday Project 2-B Bauble in Bb
    Thursday Project 5-B Blues for Alice in G
    Friday Project 3-B Angel Eyes A min
    Saturday Project 6-B C dorian modal madness

    Our last sweep through the workout on forms.
    As we're pretty familiar with the song forms at this point, let's strive for some kind of shaping or unifying theme and see how long we can keep this as a guiding beacon. We can wander, but bring it back in some form for the duration of the run, or as long as we can.
    This mindful principle is also a strong backbone in constructing a solo in a real life situation, made infinitely easier once you can add space and rhythm.
    Using this idea of a unifying idea, it may seem like a lot to juggle and a lot to work out, but once you have command of your improvisational tools, this actually makes it easier to build, hear and play a solo as it removes the tendency for your hand memory to bring you to a place your ear can't work with.

    If you hear or feel yourself going to somewhere you didn't intend, practice creating an idea you've decided upon before.
    This is control, and therein is speed, conviction and interesting story telling.
    Just a suggestion.

  37. #836
    Week 20. Day 1. Monday
    Project suggestion Project 1-B Cherokee in Db
    Speed to test and push your comfort zone.
    Cherokee is a racecourse built to test your diatonic ear and your facility with secondary dominant turnarounds.
    Move around a lot, it's the way to crack these non diatonic II V's. Shift to a strong position and anticipate the resolution to your chord of strength. Practice this. It gives speed and a strong line.
    Use articulations in both hands and learn to shift and control with both hands to find elegant articulation.
    Have fun
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-project-1-b-cherokee-db-png

  38. #837
    Week 20. Day 1 Monday
    My playing style is really changed with hammer-ons and pull offs and slides. I'm not playing positions much at all, but rather guiding lines up and along single strings to find strong notes. This keeps my phrasing organic, my swing moving and even if it's just a fret or two out of what positional playing would put it, my lines are a lot more legato and actually easier to increase the speed on.
    It feels really good.

  39. #838
    Week 20. Day 2 Tuesday
    Suggested Project 4-B ATTY in Eb
    Speed at the edge of thoughtful awareness.
    Left and right hand notes, steady eighths and triplets
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-project-4-b-attya-eb-png
    There's a lot of key and key area shifting with this piece.
    Suggestion: Anticipate the new tonalities and reserve the last beat of each tonal section to insert pickups into the next key. Target the root. And then find an entry through the 5th of the next chord, then the third. See if you can become comfortable with this "running start over the bar line". This kind of listening and playing can be steadily pushed further and further... last 2 beats, or even further. It forms tension even before it'd naturally come in the piece.

    Have fun!

  40. #839

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    Week 20. Day 2. ATTYA in Eb. I actually took a run at this last night. I was totally feeling it last night. Of course, I had been playing all day, and I wasn't burned out from a long work day like today. This evening's session was pretty good. I wasn't nailing things quite as well as I would've liked, but I was pushing myself, getting off book, playing freely. I'll have to experiment to see if I can up my tempos further. Tonight I got up to 145 bpm. I know I could go faster, but I would have to use even more hammer-ons and pull-offs to keep up. I'm trying to firm up my right hand picking, so I don't want to rely on the crutch of hammer-ons and pull-offs too much. Anyway, I'll take another stab at it now and see if I can go a little faster.

  41. #840
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Week 20. Day 2. ATTYA in Eb. I actually took a run at this last night. I was totally feeling it last night. Of course, I had been playing all day, and I wasn't burned out from a long work day like today. This evening's session was pretty good. I wasn't nailing things quite as well as I would've liked, but I was pushing myself, getting off book, playing freely. I'll have to experiment to see if I can up my tempos further. Tonight I got up to 145 bpm. I know I could go faster, but I would have to use even more hammer-ons and pull-offs to keep up. I'm trying to firm up my right hand picking, so I don't want to rely on the crutch of hammer-ons and pull-offs too much. Anyway, I'll take another stab at it now and see if I can go a little faster.
    How was playing with your friend, playing without the constraints of the "program"? Important question: Do you think it's changed your playing?

  42. #841

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    How was playing with your friend, playing without the constraints of the "program"? Important question: Do you think it's changed your playing?
    Sunday's session with my friend was actually quite good. We've been getting together and playing socially distanced for some time during the pandemic. It's warm where I live, so that made it easier to pull off. Anyway, I've always been cognizant in the back of my mind about the time I'm putting in on Super Chops and how it appears to be translating when I'm actually trying to make music. I definitely think I've grown. I'm more confident in my right hand. My ideas seem sharper. Some of Howard's cool harmonic tricks have very slowly migrated into my own playing. Of course, some days you're on and some days not so much. But this past Sunday was a very good day. It's so rewarding to actually experience the fruits of your commitment and work on the instrument. The pandemic has created this larger expanse of time that allowed me to focus more on guitar and music in general. Between finally sitting down and learning a few solos by ear earlier in the pandemic, and now the Super Chops program, I truly believe my playing has evolved. Of course, the journey continues. That's the beauty of it!

  43. #842
    Tuesday. Week 20.
    I pick up the instrument and I surprise myself. I notice this in the fact that I'm listening to my own lines and liking what I can do. That's a feedback loop. The more I listen, the more I hear. The more I work at the details, the more the big picture doesn't elude me.
    I think the biggest thing I've gotten is not technical, it's confidence and a greater working relationship with the instrument.
    I also am really grateful that I decided to use a once in a lifetime pandemic to make an end run for this prize: Real hard earned love for the instrument and the freedom that follows.
    Yeah I believe in the program, but honestly, anything that breaks you out of the temptation for distraction, puts the guitar in your hands rather than the TV or computer, taps you into your creative potential is going to have a pay off.
    Having others to work with. SO important.

  44. #843
    Week 20 Day 3. Wednesday
    Recommended project: 2-B Baubling in Bb
    Recommended speed: Your upper end of staying on the horse.
    Recommended technical tools: Right and left hand attacks. SHIFTING!
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-project-2-b-baubles-bb-png

  45. #844

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    Week 20. Day 3. Baubling in Bb. It was a pretty good session. I bumped the bpm up to 160. Since it's been weeks since I've done a recording, I shot a little video of tonight's session.


  46. #845
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Week 20. Day 3. Baubling in Bb. It was a pretty good session. I bumped the bpm up to 160. Since it's been weeks since I've done a recording, I shot a little video of tonight's session.
    NICE!!! You're right on the form and really digging into the shape and intricacies of the tune. I love the sound of the tritone subs. Every time you hit one, it's a real rush.
    This is inspiring! Great feel! Love it! Thanks for posting. You do justice to that box you're playing.

  47. #846

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    NICE!!! You're right on the form and really digging into the shape and intricacies of the tune. I love the sound of the tritone subs. Every time you hit one, it's a real rush.
    This is inspiring! Great feel! Love it! Thanks for posting. You do justice to that box you're playing.
    Thank you so much, David! I really appreciate you taking the time to respond and reinforcing that all the work we're putting in is paying off! I must admit that as soon as I hit record on my iPhone my eyes stayed on the iReal Pro chart more than my earlier passes when I wasn't recording myself. Oh, and I need to do a lot of hammer-ons and pull-offs to move at that tempo. I'll try to bump up the bmp in the last remaining days. Thanks again! Your positive, enthusiastic support throughout the program has meant so much!

  48. #847
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Oh, and I need to do a lot of hammer-ons and pull-offs to move at that tempo.
    Y'know I don't think of hammer ons, pull offs and slides as speed techniques, but phrase and legato techniques. Finding the strongest note or note groupings on each string as I'm playing and then sliding to them with a strong fingering position. This has an effect of minimizing any rhythmic awkwardness that may come from a "too strict" right hand technique.
    It's also giving me a new "vocabulary" of good melodic ideas that comes out of the left hand.

  49. #848

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    PSA: Mikko Hilden is going to have a lesson/discussion about Superchops on his YouTube channel tomorrow.

    Mikko Hilden - YouTube

  50. #849
    Week 20 Day 4 Thursday's project
    Suggested for Thursday Project 5-B Blues for Alice in G
    Diatonic studies for the left and right hand
    Maximum speed to the player's limits.
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-project-5-b-blues-alice-g-png

  51. #850
    I think for Thursday's project I'm going to do this project in Db, just because I've been playing Body and Soul a lot and I want to use this diatonic project to further familiarize myself with the keys covered in Body and Soul.
    I'll do the first chorus in Db
    Transition to an A7 at the end of the chorus and do the second chorus in the key of D
    end that chorus on D-, G7 and do the third chorus in C.
    I think this'll be fun and a good challenge to do the form of Alice in 3 keys.
    I'll let you know how it goes.