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  1. #551
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    It's always those 7#11 chords that I need to spend a moment with to see how I can best tackle them...
    The lydian dominant chord, is your chord of choice when creating a tritone sub alternative to the regular normal dominant or secondary dominant chord. So if you're settling (or target) chord wants to have some impact, you'd normally come up with a tasty dominant chord to preceed it. Any chord can be preceeded by its own dominant chord because you're winding up your sense of anticipation to "lead into" the zone of the next chord.
    In C this would be your G7. Want a more interesting sound with still lots of tasty tension? Come in from a half step above and use the lydian dominant.
    Spend a LOT of time exploring the subtleties of the lydian dominant chord. It's got a raised 4 which as tense and unsettling as that comes across as, has a very sweet resolution. Why? because if make a line that runs that #4 it's gonna sound wrong...but if it's followed by another chord a half step below, that note is then the 5 of the next chord, a very strong consonance.
    In other words it's very wrong until you hit the bar line, then it becomes a strong note that you anticipated before you even arrived at the chord.
    You figure out how to use a lydian dominant, and you'll have some great melodic options. Hint: It's a favourite chord and sound of both John Scofield and the late Michael Brecker rest his soul. A lot of times when you hear those "What IS that and how is he playing that?" sounds, it's a tritone sub with a lydian dominant chord. A very good chord to get friendly with.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #552
    Angel Eyes first version. Friday, 5th day of review
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-21-8-26-33-pm-png

  4. #553
    A treasure trove of ideas for you to analyze, transmute and put into your tool box. Don't use anything until you see what's going on and you've figured a way of coming up with your own.
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-21-8-28-55-pm-pngHoward Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-21-8-29-11-pm-png

  5. #554

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    Week 7 Day 4. 90 BPM. Highly modified BB&B ireal pro backing in Bb. Another day in my happy alternate BB&B universe. The lines keep flowing nicely with a lot of variety and a focus on real melodic content. I tried to push the tempo up a bit and the melodic content of the lines get just out of reach so I went back to 90. I'll need to have my conversation with the Angels earlier in the day tomorrow as I have a zoom meeting through my normal practice time...

  6. #555
    A strong and memorable solo always has at its core strong simple ideas. They embody an idea that shows intention, elegance, a strong relationship with harmony that makes sense to the ear. No matter what you play, it it shows strength and intention, and it's executed well, you have the makings of a good solo.

    As a melody craftsman, you must be able to find notes that convey strength. The most common notes of strength are your chord tones. But it's not enough to know what they are, or to be able to "recite" them by playing an obligatory arpeggio; you have to MEAN it. So less can say more.

    You take a major chord. C E G. Recognizable. Strong. Not moving or stirring though. Now let's take that first C and put a shadow on it. See the way that arpeggio is going up, ascending? Let's get a running start...
    B C E G. Yes, nice. We're creating movement.
    Let's look at that C to E jump, and let's create a flurry of faster movement; instead of a leap, we'll run a set of steps in there and speed up the movement.
    B C D E and then we go to G. Nice little fragment and we go to the G as our high pitch.
    Heeey... let's change direction at the G and come down. How do we break that momentum? Let's over shoot it a bit and change direction... like a Parkour jumper changing direction, change the flow of energy:
    B C D E (wind up with D E) overshoot and approach the G
    B C D E - D E A G E D C... See how we've created a sense of movement by "ornamenting and embellishing" the strength of a simple triad?
    This passage is something you may know as the beginning of Danny Boy, with chord tones embellished by a pickup note to C, a passing note connecting the 1 to the 3, an upper approach note leading to a downward movement to the 5 which jumps back down.
    So Danny Boy is a very memorable little ditty, but it's got the strength of a simple set of chord tones tastefully accented by embellishments.

    Here are some ideas to explore.
    Start a bar with a strong note, but start an approach to that note from the measure before. This is a pickup note. Be mindful of this idea, practice it and learn to use it. It'll create and organic introduction to a phrase.
    Think of a leap (a narrow or little leap is like a third, a wider leap can be a 4th or even wider) and connect those chord tones with scale steps that pass between. These are passing notes. They are defined by strong notes at either side (as opposed to noodling on scales).
    If you want to change direction, pivot on a chord or strong note, and you can overshoot and begin the change of direction by embellishing your pivot note. Practice this until it's second nature.
    You can shade any note with another note that doesn't even take up time. Like a gliss, or a slide into the note. This is a nice ornament that makes any note into a note of note (pun intended) like a nice shirt on an ordinary guy. Lots of different ornaments as a matter of fact:
    Any chord tone can be approached from below, chromatic note preceeding it is nice.
    Any chord tone can be approached from above, but be mindful of the sense of direction you're trying to create. This as an upper neighbor approach tone. Put these into your lines and you will start sounding more multi dimensional.
    You can combine upper and lower notes to make a single ornament that acts as one unit. (C E G becomes C E A F# G)
    You can ornament on the beat or off the beat. If you ornament off the beat, it makes for a strong chordal presentation, if you ornament on the beat and that brings you a strong note, it has the effect of swinging. Really explore this.

    Start to look at music not as licks you copy or thing of as one single complex string of notes, but rather see if you can discern ornaments and where they lead. When you get this, you can play ornaments and target notes and the thought process is simpler, you can think a LOT faster!

    Now there's a LOT of information here. Start with exploring this idea when you make a phrase, and really play with it until you get it, in your ears and in your fingers. Contrast embellished lines with unembellished ones. You'll start to develop tasteful textures in your playing.

    That example above that HR has embellished lines throughout. Like measure 10, there's a lot of chromatic approach notes, can you see them?
    Once you understand the idea behind creating strong simple ideas and embellishing them, you will not fall into being bored with your lines again. There'll ALWAYS be so much you can do.

    More on this topic as we progress, but for now, give it a go. See what happens.
    Have fun!

  7. #556

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    A strong and memorable solo always has at its core strong simple ideas. They embody an idea that shows intention, elegance, a strong relationship with harmony that makes sense to the ear. No matter what you play, it it shows strength and intention, and it's executed well, you have the makings of a good solo.

    As a melody craftsman, you must be able to find notes that convey strength. The most common notes of strength are your chord tones. But it's not enough to know what they are, or to be able to "recite" them by playing an obligatory arpeggio; you have to MEAN it. So less can say more.

    You take a major chord. C E G. Recognizable. Strong. Not moving or stirring though. Now let's take that first C and put a shadow on it. See the way that arpeggio is going up, ascending? Let's get a running start...
    B C E G. Yes, nice. We're creating movement.
    Let's look at that C to E jump, and let's create a flurry of faster movement; instead of a leap, we'll run a set of steps in there and speed up the movement.
    B C D E and then we go to G. Nice little fragment and we go to the G as our high pitch.
    Heeey... let's change direction at the G and come down. How do we break that momentum? Let's over shoot it a bit and change direction... like a Parkour jumper changing direction, change the flow of energy:
    B C D E (wind up with D E) overshoot and approach the G
    B C D E - D E A G E D C... See how we've created a sense of movement by "ornamenting and embellishing" the strength of a simple triad?
    This passage is something you may know as the beginning of Danny Boy, with chord tones embellished by a pickup note to C, a passing note connecting the 1 to the 3, an upper approach note leading to a downward movement to the 5 which jumps back down.
    So Danny Boy is a very memorable little ditty, but it's got the strength of a simple set of chord tones tastefully accented by embellishments.

    Here are some ideas to explore.
    Start a bar with a strong note, but start an approach to that note from the measure before. This is a pickup note. Be mindful of this idea, practice it and learn to use it. It'll create and organic introduction to a phrase.
    Think of a leap (a narrow or little leap is like a third, a wider leap can be a 4th or even wider) and connect those chord tones with scale steps that pass between. These are passing notes. They are defined by strong notes at either side (as opposed to noodling on scales).
    If you want to change direction, pivot on a chord or strong note, and you can overshoot and begin the change of direction by embellishing your pivot note. Practice this until it's second nature.
    You can shade any note with another note that doesn't even take up time. Like a gliss, or a slide into the note. This is a nice ornament that makes any note into a note of note (pun intended) like a nice shirt on an ordinary guy. Lots of different ornaments as a matter of fact:
    Any chord tone can be approached from below, chromatic note preceeding it is nice.
    Any chord tone can be approached from above, but be mindful of the sense of direction you're trying to create. This as an upper neighbor approach tone. Put these into your lines and you will start sounding more multi dimensional.
    You can combine upper and lower notes to make a single ornament that acts as one unit. (C E G becomes C E A F# G)
    You can ornament on the beat or off the beat. If you ornament off the beat, it makes for a strong chordal presentation, if you ornament on the beat and that brings you a strong note, it has the effect of swinging. Really explore this.

    Start to look at music not as licks you copy or thing of as one single complex string of notes, but rather see if you can discern ornaments and where they lead. When you get this, you can play ornaments and target notes and the thought process is simpler, you can think a LOT faster!

    Now there's a LOT of information here. Start with exploring this idea when you make a phrase, and really play with it until you get it, in your ears and in your fingers. Contrast embellished lines with unembellished ones. You'll start to develop tasteful textures in your playing.

    That example above that HR has embellished lines throughout. Like measure 10, there's a lot of chromatic approach notes, can you see them?
    Once you understand the idea behind creating strong simple ideas and embellishing them, you will not fall into being bored with your lines again. There'll ALWAYS be so much you can do.

    More on this topic as we progress, but for now, give it a go. See what happens.
    Have fun!
    Lots of cool stuff to work on. Thanks!

    Now I just need more time...

  8. #557

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    The lydian dominant chord, is your chord of choice when creating a tritone sub alternative to the regular normal dominant or secondary dominant chord. So if you're settling (or target) chord wants to have some impact, you'd normally come up with a tasty dominant chord to preceed it. Any chord can be preceeded by its own dominant chord because you're winding up your sense of anticipation to "lead into" the zone of the next chord.
    In C this would be your G7. Want a more interesting sound with still lots of tasty tension? Come in from a half step above and use the lydian dominant.
    Spend a LOT of time exploring the subtleties of the lydian dominant chord. It's got a raised 4 which as tense and unsettling as that comes across as, has a very sweet resolution. Why? because if make a line that runs that #4 it's gonna sound wrong...but if it's followed by another chord a half step below, that note is then the 5 of the next chord, a very strong consonance.
    In other words it's very wrong until you hit the bar line, then it becomes a strong note that you anticipated before you even arrived at the chord.
    You figure out how to use a lydian dominant, and you'll have some great melodic options. Hint: It's a favourite chord and sound of both John Scofield and the late Michael Brecker rest his soul. A lot of times when you hear those "What IS that and how is he playing that?" sounds, it's a tritone sub with a lydian dominant chord. A very good chord to get friendly with.
    Thank you, JBN! I now see how the #11 becomes the 5th and what a great sound that is. I think instinctively that's what I've been doing on the B7#11 to the Dm7, but in this case the #11 becomes the b3. What about the A7#11 after the Em7 and before the Dmaj9? That A7#11 doesn't appear to be functioning as a tritone sub unless I'm mistaken. I must confess I don't always try to suss out why that chord is there. I'll just try to play over it. In this case I sometimes approach the A7#11 as E melodic minor. Other times I just try to grab whatever notes sound the juiciest. Oh, and what about the F#m7 to B9 after the Cm9 and before the Bbmaj9 at the end of the form? I assume that's another way of addressing the tritone. But in this instance the B dominant isn't a #11. Especially with the ii/F#m7 before it. Thanks!

  9. #558

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    A strong and memorable solo always has at its core strong simple ideas. They embody an idea that shows intention, elegance, a strong relationship with harmony that makes sense to the ear. No matter what you play, it it shows strength and intention, and it's executed well, you have the makings of a good solo.

    As a melody craftsman, you must be able to find notes that convey strength. The most common notes of strength are your chord tones. But it's not enough to know what they are, or to be able to "recite" them by playing an obligatory arpeggio; you have to MEAN it. So less can say more.

    You take a major chord. C E G. Recognizable. Strong. Not moving or stirring though. Now let's take that first C and put a shadow on it. See the way that arpeggio is going up, ascending? Let's get a running start...
    B C E G. Yes, nice. We're creating movement.
    Let's look at that C to E jump, and let's create a flurry of faster movement; instead of a leap, we'll run a set of steps in there and speed up the movement.
    B C D E and then we go to G. Nice little fragment and we go to the G as our high pitch.
    Heeey... let's change direction at the G and come down. How do we break that momentum? Let's over shoot it a bit and change direction... like a Parkour jumper changing direction, change the flow of energy:
    B C D E (wind up with D E) overshoot and approach the G
    B C D E - D E A G E D C... See how we've created a sense of movement by "ornamenting and embellishing" the strength of a simple triad?
    This passage is something you may know as the beginning of Danny Boy, with chord tones embellished by a pickup note to C, a passing note connecting the 1 to the 3, an upper approach note leading to a downward movement to the 5 which jumps back down.
    So Danny Boy is a very memorable little ditty, but it's got the strength of a simple set of chord tones tastefully accented by embellishments.

    Here are some ideas to explore.
    Start a bar with a strong note, but start an approach to that note from the measure before. This is a pickup note. Be mindful of this idea, practice it and learn to use it. It'll create and organic introduction to a phrase.
    Think of a leap (a narrow or little leap is like a third, a wider leap can be a 4th or even wider) and connect those chord tones with scale steps that pass between. These are passing notes. They are defined by strong notes at either side (as opposed to noodling on scales).
    If you want to change direction, pivot on a chord or strong note, and you can overshoot and begin the change of direction by embellishing your pivot note. Practice this until it's second nature.
    You can shade any note with another note that doesn't even take up time. Like a gliss, or a slide into the note. This is a nice ornament that makes any note into a note of note (pun intended) like a nice shirt on an ordinary guy. Lots of different ornaments as a matter of fact:
    Any chord tone can be approached from below, chromatic note preceeding it is nice.
    Any chord tone can be approached from above, but be mindful of the sense of direction you're trying to create. This as an upper neighbor approach tone. Put these into your lines and you will start sounding more multi dimensional.
    You can combine upper and lower notes to make a single ornament that acts as one unit. (C E G becomes C E A F# G)
    You can ornament on the beat or off the beat. If you ornament off the beat, it makes for a strong chordal presentation, if you ornament on the beat and that brings you a strong note, it has the effect of swinging. Really explore this.

    Start to look at music not as licks you copy or thing of as one single complex string of notes, but rather see if you can discern ornaments and where they lead. When you get this, you can play ornaments and target notes and the thought process is simpler, you can think a LOT faster!

    Now there's a LOT of information here. Start with exploring this idea when you make a phrase, and really play with it until you get it, in your ears and in your fingers. Contrast embellished lines with unembellished ones. You'll start to develop tasteful textures in your playing.

    That example above that HR has embellished lines throughout. Like measure 10, there's a lot of chromatic approach notes, can you see them?
    Once you understand the idea behind creating strong simple ideas and embellishing them, you will not fall into being bored with your lines again. There'll ALWAYS be so much you can do.

    More on this topic as we progress, but for now, give it a go. See what happens.
    Have fun!
    That's awesome! A wealth of information! My friend Will Sellenraad encouraged me to work on playing approach notes to the chord tones a scale step above then a half step below, as well as the other way around. He referenced Jim Hall's solo on Autumn Leaves. I agree with guido5. If only I had more time! But you've provided wonderful tips. Thank you so much!

  10. #559

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    Week 7. Day 4 of BBB at 125 bpm. Ramping up the tempo is certainly getting more challenging. Like last night, the first time through, especially the initial passes in the first few minutes is like getting reacquainted with the exercise. I definitely was fumbling around a bit. But I stuck with it and things got better and better. I find myself going back to ideas I had uncovered when we first tackled these exercises weeks ago. It's like they've become motifs for me on the tune. By the third 10 minute block I'm able to follow my ear more.

  11. #560

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    Week 7 Day 5. 90 BPM. Using the "official" ireal pro backing in Dm. Fit right back in to my previous place on this, grumbling about the sparseness of the harmonic movement of the A sections and feeling awkward with the harmonic movement of the last half of the B section. I would alternate choruses between just keeping to the tone center as the chords move beneath or chasing each change neither feeling quite right. Ah well another one for the record books...

  12. #561
    Saturday. Last day of review, and it brings us up to where we left of last week.
    How's it going? Trying out any new approaches to line construction thinking of things in terms of CT and embellishments? I'll continue this discussion if it seems informative. Great things ahead!
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-22-10-41-16-pm-png
    And in the interest of applied line techniques:
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-22-10-44-53-pm-pngHoward Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-22-10-45-09-pm-png
    See if this has any recognizable line shaping devices you can see. Take note of note order, direction, relationships between chord tones and other notes, range, leaps and how they're treated. Take note and see if you can incorporate one new "attitude" of note and line making every day or so. You'll be surprised at how quickly you can really build facility in very sophisticated (and beautifully satisfying) lines.

  13. #562

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    Week 7. Day 5 "Angel Eyes" at 130 bpm. Once again the initial pass through had a lot of "Nice to see you again" getting to know you moments. I decided to masochistically record myself.

  14. #563
    Quote Originally Posted by guido5 View Post
    Week 7 Day 5. 90 BPM. Using the "official" ireal pro backing in Dm. Fit right back in to my previous place on this, grumbling about the sparseness of the harmonic movement of the A sections and feeling awkward with the harmonic movement of the last half of the B section. I would alternate choruses between just keeping to the tone center as the chords move beneath or chasing each change neither feeling quite right. Ah well another one for the record books...
    Can you put your finger on what it is that keeps you from engaging with the changes? With changes that don't have a lot of overt structure (Vamp A minor dorian until cue... for instance), you have the responsibility to make the structure, in addition to making the time. Well, that's the point of this whole 20 weeks, actually: to get a firm footing on one aspect (ear, concept, fingers) and then turn our attention to the more shaky grounds as they're revealed.
    Grumbling is good...when it's followed by enough frustration to confront the walls you meet. Get really frustrated and pissed at your ideas, then take the break and think. What's on that list of things I promised myself I'd try? (groupings of notes in 3 as opposed to 4, follow a line up one string until it takes you into another position then change direction when you get there, too many scale steps? how about a series of arpeggios in the same direction, from the 3rd, from the 5th and then a bluesy passage when you get to the 1, focus on 2 chord tones and see how many sides, sounds and ideas can come out of them with approach notes, put the accent of your notes on the beats-then on the "and" of the beats-what happens? Just because a set of changes sets out an outline doesn't mean you can't learn to hear alternative changes: If something says Amin for 2 bars, you CAN play a half bar of Bb7 and come back to Amin. You master this and you've got the seeds of tons of phrases you can construct in your "bag")
    Try beginning the recording with the B section, let the changes inspire you to ideas that move quicker, then see if you can take some of that attitude into the A.
    Once you have control of your fingers, reach for the reins that control the ideas. It's a constant exchange of mastery. That's the real point in these 20 weeks. You'll get it!

  15. #564

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    Week 7. Day 6. "Angel Eyes" in A minor at 135 bpm. I tried to incorporate some of JBN's comments on guido5's post from last night to freshen up my ideas. The faster tempos make it more challenging to construct lines incorporating ornamentation, targeting specific notes, etc. I'm often torn about ramping up the beats per minute during this course. I don't want to keep repeating the same ideas obviously. But I also feel the need to push myself. Like so many others, I can feel stymied by my right hand technique. Not that I feel the need to shred. Look at Jim Hall. But I'd like the ability to do more with my right hand. More than anything I want to play tasteful musical ideas.

  16. #565
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan View Post
    Like so many others, I can feel stymied by my right hand technique. Not that I feel the need to shred. Look at Jim Hall. But I'd like the ability to do more with my right hand. More than anything I want to play tasteful musical ideas.
    Here's something to think about.
    Lack of speed in the right hand can sometimes, and oft times be blamed on hesitancy of the left hand. Yes, you hear notes in the right hand because that hand is responsible for making sound, but it's also going to avoid producing sound if there's not the confidence of playing the correct notes in the fretting hand. If you can increase the speed of thought and execution, of placement of the notes, of creating flow and intention in your left hand, your right hand will play them. Once again, a lexicon of ornamental figures, once integrated with a savvy, trained ear, will allow you 2,3 or even 4 notes with one practiced thought process. You can create lines as fast as you can think. Once you believe and hear those lines, your hands will play them as fast as you can create them.
    Also try reframing the duties of the right hand to include dynamics and swing. Those are functions that connect that hand with the ear.

  17. #566

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    Week 7 Day 65. 90 BPM. Using the "official" ireal pro backing in Am. Tried to incorporate some of the new approaches per JBN suggestion but I'm still suffering from brain fog. The static A section is killing brain cells and the impenetrable B throws the survivors under the bus. I just really do not understand what HR is doing with the B section at all. The tonal motion just seems arbitrary and nonsensical to my ears.

    But I don't have to play it again tomorrow so I can sleep happy...

  18. #567
    Quote Originally Posted by guido5 View Post
    ... and the impenetrable B throws the survivors under the bus. I just really do not understand what HR is doing with the B section at all. The tonal motion just seems arbitrary and nonsensical to my ears.
    ...
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-6-15-03-am-png

    Let's take a look at this. The B section is in three sections, I've put them in red, green and blue.
    RED:
    To get the most out of this section, you'll need to understand the two common uses of the dominant chord.
    1) The tritone substitution. That's a 7th from a half step above. Usually a mixolydian #4 scale. Get to know this and practice it so you can hear and use it.
    2) The secondary Dominant. That's a 7th chord from a 4th below (or a 5th above) any other diatonic or any chord for that matter.
    These two dominants will be the ways you graduate from "Oh yeah" sound to "Oh Wow!" sounds. They serve to accentuate the line of the phrase with surprise and contrast. They're the unexpected adjectives of harmony.
    Now I've written out a harmonic analysis of the B section but before you start, understand that that B section is in three keys. First is a section in F, with some II V stuff bringing you there. That's in red.
    The second section is in E, with some II V stuff bringing you there. That's in green.
    The last section is the gateway back to the A minor section. That's in A and it's a II V to the parent key of A, (A minor).
    Finally, when you see a III minor chord, like A- in the third measure, that's a III chord substitute for the I chord. Try to play this at an F/A, or an A- with a flat 6 (5 - - 5 6 -) that's F/A. Don't just play an A minor scale, hear it as an F scale starting from the third degree.

    You want me to walk you through the section measure by measure?
    1) this is the II of F, the new key of the piece when you get to the B section.
    2) Here's the V7 followed by the Gb7(#11), this is the tritone sub that leads your ear to F.
    3) Now there's a switcheroo here, instead of the F Major, you have the F starting from the third degree. It sounds quite the same but it's not as obvious and it flows better.
    4) This is the secondary dominant, the D7 sets your ear up to go to the II chord
    5) Here's the II chord, it's diatonic, and it's going to take you home.
    6) On the way home, we go down by 1/2 step and the tritone sub
    7) HOME chord! Here's the F we've been setting up. It arrives...and then instead of just sitting on a static chord, we walk up the diatonic chords II, III and this is NOT a mandate to play every one of those chords. God no! Just do something in F. We're about to leave the key.
    8) Now we're in E. Measure 8 is the II chord of the new key, setting up a II V movement.
    9) Instead of a normal V7, here's a tritone sub with its own II attached. A common way to approach a chord and create some tension.
    10) E chord. Our new I chord, but played from the III chord. You want to hear this as E chord first inversion.
    11) VI chord in E. This chord has so many notes in common with a I chord that it's a brother to the I chord. I, VI and III chord are known as TONIC chords. They're kin.
    12 and 13) this is a little passage that takes you out but announces something coming that will make it all make sense.
    14) NEW KEY of A, we're going home!
    15) Tritone sub to A minor.

    Look at the section called NOW HEAR THIS.
    This is the essential tonality. Use this to hear what's going on and then if you can hear it, GET OFF BOOK, hear it and play to this. Then as you become familiar with the tritone subs, Tonic chord subs and secondary dominants, start to use them.
    Last edited by Jimmy blue note; 01-24-2021 at 07:17 AM.

  19. #568

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    Hey, JBN. Thank you so much for the analysis of the B section of "Angel Eyes." I get most everything you're saying. A couple questions if I may.

    #8: Now we're in E. Measure 8 is the II chord of the new key, setting up a II V movement.

    Just to clarify. I realize Am7 is still in the key of F. I don't see this measure as the II of the new key. Are you simply saying the Fm7 is setting up the F#m7 in the next measure, which of course is the ii in the new key?

    #14 So Bm11 is the ii of A minor? If it was written as Bm7b5 that would make it easier for me to see on the fly.

    #15 Lastly how does the C/Bb in the last measure function as a tritone sub? I'm always a bit thrown by that chord here. I typically just start going home to A minor. With the Bb in the bass is that sort of like a C7? Is the Bb in the bass the tritone sub? If so, why C major above the bass note?

    Again, thank you so much for taking the time to explain all of this. I know we all really appreciate it!

  20. #569
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan View Post

    #14 So Bm11 is the ii of A minor? If it was written as Bm7b5 that would make it easier for me to see on the fly.

    Again, thank you so much for taking the time to explain all of this. I know we all really appreciate it!
    It's technically in A Major. Before the target arrives, the "pointers" to a tonality can imply different qualities. This is called modal interchange. You see this in pieces, say, like Night and Day, where the turnaround is minor in quality but it goes to Major, and then a Major turnaround goes to a minor. They're bi-lingual highway exit signs but you are allowed to change them (with taste and intention) when the situation arises. It's not a fixed done deal, turnarounds.
    If anything, this exercize project shows the interchangibility of turnaround "adjectives".
    I will note, that each of the types of dominant substitutes I mentioned deserves full attention and mastery. In this way, these superchops exercises will introduce and broaden your own ear and facility beyond what is contained merely in the original standard version. These are actually thoughtful etudes that demand you become facile in some very hip techniques that will serve you way beyond the project and standard itself.
    If it doesn't make sense, it's good that you say so, because like ornaments, turnarounds and harmonic substitutions are just a HINT or SUGGESTION of what to play. If you don't hear it for its spirit, you can't be convincing in the act. If you don't have a sound in your head, you can't make a sound with your hands.
    Explore how these devices can be played and you'll form your personality on the instrument. Hey, it doesn't come overnight, be patient, but be mindful in the process. That's why I did this analysis.
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan View Post
    #15 Lastly how does the C/Bb in the last measure function as a tritone sub? I'm always a bit thrown by that chord here. I typically just start going home to A minor. With the Bb in the bass is that sort of like a C7? Is the Bb in the bass the tritone sub? If so, why C major above the bass note?
    Here the root movement is what you watch. Triads over bass notes are a real cool can of worms. Maybe I'll open them up sometime in the future (this is turning into a real course in mastering real sound craft, isn't it?). But suffice it to say that is a voicing of a C7 (7th in the bass) chord and it you analyze it from the Bb, it's a chord with a 6, a 9 and a #11. But don't sweat the analysis, it's the sound of a pretty cool chord on its way down to the A (major or minor, it's not clear at this point) and the root movement is what you want to pay attention to.

    SOOOOO, all of this is only the guideline by which you can learn to actively open up your ear and thoughtfully add spice to a form which you must, as you astutely point out, be able to hear if you want to be convincing. If you understand spice, and use it sparingly while knowing the flavour you wish to bring out, you'll play with taste and suprise. Until you can know the spice, you'll wind up with obligatory note playing; that's our enemy.

    Each time you play through these, you make small breakthroughs.
    I hope this helps.
    That section labelled NOW HEAR THIS is a good beginning point. If you hear the bones, and you know how muscle and tissue works, you can put together a very hip solo. That's the real project.

    Now I will say next week's piece is a similar vehicle: a familiar and MUST KNOW standard with HR treatment (that's why the HR versions are ostensibly more problematic than the standards they're based on) and if it would be helpful, I'll prepare a full blown analysis and break down so it makes sense.
    You can then see the process, the difference between a "read through" and a deeply informed compositional process that marks a compelling solo.
    Would that be helpful?

  21. #570

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    JBN -- Thanks for these fantastic annotations and descriptions. Sort of packing an entire advanced theory class into sixteen bars. A whole lot to try to absorb while trying to simultaneously work on technical speed and accuracy. I guess I know what I need to work on for my day off...

  22. #571
    Quote Originally Posted by guido5 View Post
    JBN -- Thanks for these fantastic annotations and descriptions. Sort of packing an entire advanced theory class into sixteen bars. A whole lot to try to absorb while trying to simultaneously work on technical speed and accuracy. I guess I know what I need to work on for my day off...
    Patience and congratulations on making it to here. That's top of today's list!

  23. #572
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-23-11-02-04-pm-png

  24. #573

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note View Post
    SNIP
    Now I will say next week's piece is a similar vehicle: a familiar and MUST KNOW standard with HR treatment (that's why the HR versions are ostensibly more problematic than the standards they're based on) and if it would be helpful, I'll prepare a full blown analysis and break down so it makes sense.
    You can then see the process, the difference between a "read through" and a deeply informed compositional process that marks a compelling solo.
    Would that be helpful?
    Yes the analysis would be very helpful!

  25. #574

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note View Post
    It's technically in A Major. Before the target arrives, the "pointers" to a tonality can imply different qualities. This is called modal interchange. You see this in pieces, say, like Night and Day, where the turnaround is minor in quality but it goes to Major, and then a Major turnaround goes to a minor. They're bi-lingual highway exit signs but you are allowed to change them (with taste and intention) when the situation arises. It's not a fixed done deal, turnarounds.
    If anything, this exercize project shows the interchangibility of turnaround "adjectives".
    I will note, that each of the types of dominant substitutes I mentioned deserves full attention and mastery. In this way, these superchops exercises will introduce and broaden your own ear and facility beyond what is contained merely in the original standard version. These are actually thoughtful etudes that demand you become facile in some very hip techniques that will serve you way beyond the project and standard itself.
    If it doesn't make sense, it's good that you say so, because like ornaments, turnarounds and harmonic substitutions are just a HINT or SUGGESTION of what to play. If you don't hear it for its spirit, you can't be convincing in the act. If you don't have a sound in your head, you can't make a sound with your hands.
    Explore how these devices can be played and you'll form your personality on the instrument. Hey, it doesn't come overnight, be patient, but be mindful in the process. That's why I did this analysis.

    Here the root movement is what you watch. Triads over bass notes are a real cool can of worms. Maybe I'll open them up sometime in the future (this is turning into a real course in mastering real sound craft, isn't it?). But suffice it to say that is a voicing of a C7 (7th in the bass) chord and it you analyze it from the Bb, it's a chord with a 6, a 9 and a #11. But don't sweat the analysis, it's the sound of a pretty cool chord on its way down to the A (major or minor, it's not clear at this point) and the root movement is what you want to pay attention to.

    SOOOOO, all of this is only the guideline by which you can learn to actively open up your ear and thoughtfully add spice to a form which you must, as you astutely point out, be able to hear if you want to be convincing. If you understand spice, and use it sparingly while knowing the flavour you wish to bring out, you'll play with taste and suprise. Until you can know the spice, you'll wind up with obligatory note playing; that's our enemy.

    Each time you play through these, you make small breakthroughs.
    I hope this helps.
    That section labelled NOW HEAR THIS is a good beginning point. If you hear the bones, and you know how muscle and tissue works, you can put together a very hip solo. That's the real project.

    Now I will say next week's piece is a similar vehicle: a familiar and MUST KNOW standard with HR treatment (that's why the HR versions are ostensibly more problematic than the standards they're based on) and if it would be helpful, I'll prepare a full blown analysis and break down so it makes sense.
    You can then see the process, the difference between a "read through" and a deeply informed compositional process that marks a compelling solo.
    Would that be helpful?
    This is fabulous. Thank you! Yeah, I originally saw the Bm11 as the key of A major. I also realized that the C/Bb has the 6, 9 and #11 of Bb. Not that I necessarily approached it that way. Again I feel like for me it's a balancing act of hearing and recognizing these substitutions, but not chasing them so much that I get pulled away entirely from the underlying fundamental structure of the tune.

  26. #575
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan View Post
    Again I feel like for me it's a balancing act of hearing and recognizing these substitutions, but not chasing them so much that I get pulled away entirely from the underlying fundamental structure of the tune.
    I'm loving that as we go through these weeks together, we are realizing and sharing the many unexpected and unsuspected aspects and facets that go into being soloists (and compers too). Yes it's fine to uncode the layers of meaning in the changes, but it's how you use that knowledge, and the ways we use the investment in our own progress to make a solo. Never lose sight of the fact that it's expressive music we're making here. Hone the skills, find and work down the obstacles and through our daily work, you'll have the freedom and skills to make a fresh and worthy solo that is you. Every time.

  27. #576
    Week 8. Monday. Weekly goal 96 played with TRIPLETS.
    Here we are at the second phase of our journey. The piece this project 4-A is based upon is that all iconic All The Things You Are.
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-1-33-40-pm-pngHoward Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-1-34-02-pm-png
    Do keep in mind that our goal is not to play All The Things You Are, but to use the form of the changes to execute lines that will challenge our facilities and teach us something about ourselves and our limitations, and then to overcome them. Read the instruction set. Detailed study notes will follow.

  28. #577
    Study notes for Project 4-A. These are some points based upon questions and observations you've provided in the past weeks.
    I'd suggest that you look at the changes, and internalize them to the best of your abilities. The goal is to make the piece as 3 dimensional as you can before you start negotiating the landscape. Know the map and internalize it. Get OFF MAP ASAP.
    This post focuses on the BIG picture. Tonal areas.
    SO. The piece follows 5 distinct tonal areas. When you open up a piece, determine the tonal areas so you know when you're approaching a key change, and never show surprise at the bar line where you're notes take on different identities.
    Here I've drawn out a map. Somewhere in your mind you might want to visualize your own version; this is my view.
    First 5 bars (in blue) are in Ab.
    Next 3 bars (in green) are in the key of C.
    Third system begins the key of Eb -starting with the relative minor of that key- and that's 5 bars I've put in purple. (notice this is a parallel to the first two systems)
    Bar 13 starts a section in the key of G. That's in orange.
    Yes that section marked with the letter B is the bridge. It stays in G, and is blocked in orange still.
    Last system of the bridge is in the key of E ,blocked in red, with a dramatic warning sign (turnaround) that says..
    Section C is back in the original key of Ab, three systems in blue with some good devices that create one really big turnaround back to Ab and home.
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-1-57-39-pm-png

  29. #578
    The source piece All The Things You Are with harmonic analysis.
    If you are not absolutely fluent with knowing your diatonic scale in modal form, and have some chord scale fluency, I highly recommend it. Each of these changes is accompanied by a roman numeral that corresponds to the colour of the tonal area. You can see for example that those changes outline a VI- II- V7 IMaj IV Maj in the key of Ab written in blue with the tonal centre circled. I've given the whole piece this analysis.
    This is a conceptualization that is the way I see the piece.
    NOTE: This, of course is only one way to see the piece. If you see things in arpeggios and phrases taken from transcriptions and ornaments you've internalized, by all means. Improvisation is totally unique. This is the way I map a landscape.
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-2-07-34-pm-png
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-2-11-07-pm-png

  30. #579
    And finally, here's Project 4-A with the same harmonic analysis.
    There are additional Tritone subs, harmonic substitutions based on inversions, secondary dominant chords and turnarounds, all appropriately marked and labelled.
    If these are not internalized, work on that and develop facility at this point. You'll use this knowledge from now on in everything you play and it's the stuff that marks you as a savvy player.
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-2-16-55-pm-png

    These 3 posts address form and conceptualizing the landscape; creating the map to freedom.
    Look at these and starting Monday, I can talk about ways to use triplet note groupings (our new challenge) to create lines.

    Hope this helps. Take it or leave it. Just keep moving and keep the music coming!

  31. #580

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note View Post
    And finally, here's Project 4-A with the same harmonic analysis.
    There are additional Tritone subs, harmonic substitutions based on inversions, secondary dominant chords and turnarounds, all appropriately marked and labelled.
    If these are not internalized, work on that and develop facility at this point. You'll use this knowledge from now on in everything you play and it's the stuff that marks you as a savvy player.
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-2-16-55-pm-png

    These 3 posts address form and conceptualizing the landscape; creating the map to freedom.
    Look at these and starting Monday, I can talk about ways to use triplet note groupings (our new challenge) to create lines.

    Hope this helps. Take it or leave it. Just keep moving and keep the music coming!
    This is fabulous, JBN! Thank you. That Bb over D in bar 11 sounds great. Certainly recognizing Howard's subs and changes. One question. The Bb13 in bar 16... you call it a tritone sub. What is it subbing for that's a tritone away? Or is it simply called a tritone sub because of the half-step movement down to Am9 in the next bar? Thanks!

  32. #581
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    This is fabulous, JBN! Thank you. That Bb over D in bar 11 sounds great. Certainly recognizing Howard's subs and changes. One question. The Bb13 in bar 16... you call it a tritone sub. What is it subbing for that's a tritone away? Or is it simply called a tritone sub because of the half-step movement down to Am9 in the next bar? Thanks!
    Good question. The normal dominant chord to A would be an E7 of some sort. The "active ingredients in that chord are the 3rd degree and the b7, G# and D. Those juicy notes combine to demand resolution, or in other words they make the juice in the chord that moves strongly back to the target. When they're the 3rd and the b7, they're an E7 chord. When they're the b7 and the 3rd, they're a Bb. A tritone away. Same two notes, share two dominant roots a tritone away. That's the idea. The sound is just a dominant a half step above the root.
    Cool, eh?

  33. #582

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    Good question. The normal dominant chord to A would be an E7 of some sort. The "active ingredients in that chord are the 3rd degree and the b7, G# and D. Those juicy notes combine to demand resolution, or in other words they make the juice in the chord that moves strongly back to the target. When they're the 3rd and the b7, they're an E7 chord. When they're the b7 and the 3rd, they're a Bb. A tritone away. Same two notes, share two dominant roots a tritone away. That's the idea. The sound is just a dominant a half step above the root.
    Cool, eh?
    Very cool! Yes. Now I realize the Bb13 is a tritone sub for the V7 of Am9. I should've seen that! Thank you!!

  34. #583

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    I just took a pass at this latest exercise. Mainly I was curious about the steady 8th note triplets. Wow, that can sound corny fast! After a few minutes I tried to keep the triplets going, but with some accents to make it less like the Lawrence Welk show. I hope/assume I'm doing the triplets correctly.

  35. #584
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    I just took a pass at this latest exercise. Mainly I was curious about the steady 8th note triplets. Wow, that can sound corny fast! After a few minutes I tried to keep the triplets going, but with some accents to make it less like the Lawrence Welk show. I hope/assume I'm doing the triplets correctly.
    If you don't have anything to say and you're winging it on content, it's going to sound pretty corny as you say.
    Hint: Start with quarter notes working with chord tones a lot, and not just straight root based arpeggios. Then use the triplets to form embellishments, approach notes, repeat notes, but always going to the next chord tone you have in mind.
    It's not easy. But see if it doesn't make you work harder, then eventually smoother in creating good ideas.
    More when we actually start tomorrow~

  36. #585

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    If you don't have anything to say and you're winging it on content, it's going to sound pretty corny as you say.
    Hint: Start with quarter notes working with chord tones a lot, and not just straight root based arpeggios. Then use the triplets to form embellishments, approach notes, repeat notes, but always going to the next chord tone you have in mind.
    It's not easy. But see if it doesn't make you work harder, then eventually smoother in creating good ideas.
    More when we actually start tomorrow~
    Just to clarify... you're suggesting not playing steady triplets from the drop of the first beat, but starting with quarter notes and then using triplets to embellish the chord tones?

  37. #586
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Just to clarify... you're suggesting not playing steady triplets from the drop of the first beat, but starting with quarter notes and then using triplets to embellish the chord tones?
    Yes. One note per beat to focus your flow and melodic direction. Once you can feel a good relationship with the harmony, and once you have the pacing to hear as you think, develop triplets in many forms to form "connective tissue". Pickup notes to the next chord, approach notes, passing notes-diatonic and chromatic, as a way to prepare leaps, as a means of changing direction.
    You see, once you begin to speed up, the temptation is go on instinct, to just fill space. It's a more difficult and ultimately fruitful one to create complex lines that show motif, or show a relationship with other notes, that form arcs of shape that make substance within a key area. For that, you'll want to be able to decisively embrace strong ideas, and keep the flow of them using connective notes. NOT get lost in notes that sound like noodling. This takes practice, but hey, that's what we're here for.
    This use of triplets also sets up a rhythmic inertia that really swings when done right. Find the swing in the triplet and find the way to think of three notes as one.
    Respect the changes, think of them as a partner when you solo and bring out the best in what they offer.
    Just more for you to balance on your plate

  38. #587

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    Yes. One note per beat to focus your flow and melodic direction. Once you can feel a good relationship with the harmony, and once you have the pacing to hear as you think, develop triplets in many forms to form "connective tissue". Pickup notes to the next chord, approach notes, passing notes-diatonic and chromatic, as a way to prepare leaps, as a means of changing direction.
    You see, once you begin to speed up, the temptation is go on instinct, to just fill space. It's a more difficult and ultimately fruitful one to create complex lines that show motif, or show a relationship with other notes, that form arcs of shape that make substance within a key area. For that, you'll want to be able to decisively embrace strong ideas, and keep the flow of them using connective notes. NOT get lost in notes that sound like noodling. This takes practice, but hey, that's what we're here for.
    This use of triplets also sets up a rhythmic inertia that really swings when done right. Find the swing in the triplet and find the way to think of three notes as one.
    Respect the changes, think of them as a partner when you solo and bring out the best in what they offer.
    Just more for you to balance on your plate
    That sounds great. I definitely don't want to just noodle! Thanks as always, JBN!!

  39. #588
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-6-49-18-pm-pngHoward Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-6-49-31-pm-pngHoward Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-6-49-43-pm-pngHoward Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-6-49-57-pm-png

    Here you've got changes and notes. You can also see one way to employ some of the options I've been outlining. Look at what you make, your choices, and see why and why they don't work. See if there are things here that you can use, and how they impress you on a gut level. Digest them and then feel free to try to incorporate them in your own way.

  40. #589

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note
    Howard Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-6-49-18-pm-pngHoward Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-6-49-31-pm-pngHoward Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-6-49-43-pm-pngHoward Roberts Super Chops: study group for a tune based practice routine-screen-shot-2021-01-24-6-49-57-pm-png

    Here you've got changes and notes. You can also see one way to employ some of the options I've been outlining. Look at what you make, your choices, and see why and why they don't work. See if there are things here that you can use, and how they impress you on a gut level. Digest them and then feel free to try to incorporate them in your own way.
    Forgive my ignorance, but I assume the numbers above the notes are fingering suggestions? What about the circled numbers below the notes?

  41. #590

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    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Forgive my ignorance, but what do the numbers above the notes mean? What about the circled numbers below the notes?
    I'd like to know too. It is some sort of position hint notation but it is not clear what help he's trying to offer...

  42. #591
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Forgive my ignorance, but I assume the numbers above the notes are fingering suggestions? What about the circled numbers below the notes?
    The circled numerals indicate the string that particular note is played on, 1= high E, 4=D for example. The numerals on top of the note indicates the finger 1=index 4=ring
    ONLY a suggestion. HR says try different locations.
    Suggestion: print it out, circle or highlight the chord tones based on the chord lead sheet and observe the relationship of the notes based on that. It's a reverse engineering of your actual thought process. THEN try to find the place to play it. You'll learn a lot more and it's good ear training.

  43. #592

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    Hi All:

    Still here. I'm a bit behind everyone; I just finished Week 5 at 108. I'm keeping up the steady 8th notes and beginning to find melodic and interesting ways to negotiate the changes. For me, the trick seems to be to focus on common tones between tonal centers so that I can repeat or develop a motif across the bar lines of a shifting tonal center.

  44. #593

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    Week 8. Day 1 of "ATTYA" at 71 bpm. Wow, this is challenging! I'm not even focusing on the triplets too much. Like JBN suggested, I'm trying to outline the chords first then use triplets for various embellishments. Often that's over the changes that haven't been altered by Howard. But there are so many potential traps of tritone subs, etc. I'm trying to make sense of all of this. I realize I should recognize the tritone chords, hear them and see the notes on the fretboard. I must confess I'm not there yet. But I'm also trying to figure out the subs real purpose. It seems to me they're here to create tension and act as an altered V leading to the next chord. Often they are V7#5 chords leading to the next chord. For example, Db7#11 in bar 6 could be seen as a G7#5 leading to Cmaj7, right? I know that I could also play Ab melodic minor over the Db7#11. Maybe I'm way overthinking this. But I'm actually trying to simply it like I said by seeing these subs as tension to be released in the ensuing chord. But I don't want to simplify to the extent that I miss the point of the exercise. But often for me I feel that chasing the particular sub chord too much leads me too far astray from the underlying harmony and intent of the tune. Not sure if this makes sense. There's no doubt this course is getting more challenging!

  45. #594
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Wow, this is challenging! ... But I'm also trying to figure out the subs real purpose. It seems to me they're here to create tension and act as an altered V leading to the next chord.
    .... Maybe I'm way overthinking this. But I'm actually trying to simply it like I said by seeing these subs as tension to be released in the ensuing chord. But I don't want to simplify to the extent that I miss the point of the exercise. But often for me I feel that chasing the particular sub chord too much leads me too far astray from the underlying harmony and intent of the tune. Not sure if this makes sense.
    In some ways, in a lot of ways, what we're doing here mirrors an approach to improvisation through history in that as music evolved, the language became more sophisticated, the thinking you need to do, as you astutely pointed out, becomes more challenging, more exclusive you might say, and may lose people along the way.
    I do want to address that part of the learning curve at this point. As the music became more popular during the swing era, jazz has been driven by an entire community of very sophisticated innovators at each step of the way. With each era and innovator, the skillset and the ability to hear, appreciate and ultimately create, became more demanding.
    I like the Howard Roberts approach because it doesn't shy away from the modern language that made up bop, post bop and it's still gotta have swing.
    All this took decades to assimilate as a music; here we're trying to do it in 20 weeks?

    Yeah, there are sharp grades in the learning curve, then plateaus where we assimilate. That's reflected in a way by a piece, then that piece in a parallel key each two weeks.
    I think each couple of weeks, I may try to include a more simplified version of the assigned project, or if the project is based on a standard, yes, feel free to work on that, without the HR graduate course :-)
    The point is, there is an arc we're on and for me, I revisit this every few years, even to the point that the template of a tune a week became something I regularly do now. I think it's not the goal here to learn, assimilate and master everything offered here in this 20 week course, it's to use the format to find your own level and bring you to the next level. The goal is to stick with it because the world of jazz guitar is full of dreamers who have guitars and no software and acquired ability to realize the sounds they need. THAT comes from time on the instrument and exposure to the unique approaches out of which come the "jazz thought" which is one of applied ideas and the ability to hear, think and play at a high level. That's why jazz is different. THat's why we're doing this course. That's why I'm trying to offer tips on literally reading between the lines here.

    Yeah, big challenge this week. But there's something to be learned for everyone. If you can take a piece like All The Things You Are, and see it in a way where you can ride the changes through the different keys, really hear it and embrace the twists and turns of the piece, then you hear it. That's IT! You've got it.
    The tritone subs ARE a way of creating more hills in the roller coaster ride, maybe a corkscrew, maybe an inverted loop, but it's gravity that ties it all together no matter what ride you're on. That's the ear.

    The supplemental notes I put in this week are out there as a guide. I'm not going to do this deep a treatment every week. It's just one way, my way that I look at a piece when I learn it. It's full of Take-It-Or-Leave-It luggage. Realize too, that those notes are a product of a lot of years I've been trying to figure it out myself. I'm a much different player now than I was when I began this thread years ago. I'm a much different player than I was at the start of the pandemic.
    Go though the week, share your revelations and frustrations, I'll offer some things as I see them. I've been through the frustrations and I encounter the puzzle of how to make sense of this every day. We learn together here.

    If there are any lurkers out there, anyone else following who can offer insights from your work in this material, either as we do it now, or from learning to achieve proficiency in the past, please do feel free to contribute. So glad we're doing this. Thank you all.

  46. #595

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    Week 8. Day 2 of "ATTYA" at 75 bpm. The first 10 minutes was another blur. Somewhere in the second ten minutes it dawned on me to stop playing so many notes and really listen to the harmony. I know I should always be doing that! Instead of reading the harmony, listen to it. So the third 10 minutes was much more enjoyable. I was following my ear more on the HR twists and turns. It actually kind of reminded me of tunes on The Real Howard Roberts and Howard Roberts Is A Funky Guitar Player. Not my playing, of course. But the harmony. The intention behind it. The adventurous fun I hear on those fabulous recordings. I admit I wasn't too focused on triplets. I certainly threw them in when it seemed tasty. My playing actually got a bit more earthy and "bluesy" in a good way, I hope. Anyway, the obvious concept of listening more and playing less seemed to pay off in the end. I look forward to doing it again tomorrow.

  47. #596
    I was having the same experience. A kind of paradox, the more pressure I was under to make the notes, the more I looked ahead, always looking to find myself within a tonal area. As I was creating lines up, then down, I had this impression of being on a race course, 4 bars of twists, downshift for 3 bars and the line to that same course in Eb then G. It was kind of cool to force myself to not get tripped up in the moment, but to look ahead.
    I had a lot of fun. As far as triplets, if I heard an idea ahead of time, (note repeated with a lower neighbor between, scale passage, upper neighbor/lower neighbor/chord tone, chromatic approach and repeated chord tone were a few ideas I was keeping in mind and trying out) I'd go much smoother. The trick is to see it ahead of time. Triplet ideas are nice to practice ideas on ahead of time. When I do the Project, I have things in mind, and pay attention to the road sign warnings and it's fun.
    Every day it gets a little easier and a lot more comfortable.
    See the change in key area. Shift and move. Create a shape and build it with 3 note groupings. Juggling act, but it sounds really nice when it falls in the right way.

  48. #597

    User Info Menu

    Week 8 day 3. 70 BPM using the straight ATTYA ireal pro backing. Continuing to bumble along in tripletish fashion. Slowly but surely the lines are getting more interesting, certainly as many triplet containing ideas as I can stuff in, but many are repetitive and others are still making the changes and no more.

  49. #598

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    Week 8. Day 3 of ATTYA at 80 bpm. I tried to follow my lead from last night by really hearing Howard's altered harmony and making those twists and turns as musical as possible. It's beginning to sink in more. I'm hearing it better than I initially did. I'm not focusing on the triplets too much. I continue to try and incorporate them to embellish chord tones, often on the more standard ATTYA changes that I'm familiar with. I hope I'm not defeating the purpose of the exercise by not playing constant 8th note triplets. Maybe I'll take another run or two at it this evening and see if I can focus more on the triplets.

  50. #599

    User Info Menu

    The triplet provides a nice, pre-built structure for the enclosure of chord tones...

  51. #600
    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    I continue to try and incorporate them to embellish chord tones, often on the more standard ATTYA changes that I'm familiar with. I hope I'm not defeating the purpose of the exercise by not playing constant 8th note triplets. .
    Not at all! The purpose of this 20 weeks is to find the best within you through regular and dedicated time on the guitar. The forms and Projects give you a systematic template of areas that it's good to have a fluency in, but that's not a point of gospel, in my opinion.
    I DO think learning is non linear, and if you, for example, came out of this being able to navigate a song form, anticipate tonal areas with elegance and maybe look at tritone subs in a confident way, then that's amazing! It's the process that breaks you through.
    I'll try to provide enough of a breakdown on each project so you can have a big picture and some guideline of devices or techniques within, but anything that comes of just playing every day is pure gold. It's the only way to make the breakthroughs that make you a fluid player.