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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by freud
    Thank You very much Christian for Your advices.
    Anybody have something else to add? Any interesting expierence with this method? Any Influence?
    It's in no way rocket science, you just have to spend a few hundred hours working on it

    1) Get used to running triads all over the neck... This is easier than scales, there are simply less notes
    2) Run the basic triads of the tune - 1 3 5 of the chords on the guitar. Get it so you can link them particularly in semitones - so rather than going 1-3-5 etc on every chord, link the Ab in an Fm triad into the G in a Cm triad, and so on. Also, be aware of common tones - for instance the C is common to both Fm and Cm
    3) Now, only when you are comfortable with this, do the same for related triads - on 3-5-7, 5-7-9, 7-9-11 and so on - so for Fm that would be Ab, Cm and Eb respectively, which would give you a composite Fm7, Fm9 (no 3) and Fm11 (no 3) sound.
    The voice leading possibilities are particularly fun for dominants.
    4) Transcribe A LOT
    5) have fun
    6) There's a lot more possibilities, but that will keep you busy.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by freud
    Yes,of course. I meant G7 dominant.
    I use both Abm6 and Abm7 in the same time. One fingering. Standard + this one note extra. And Im chooseing better in current context.
    How do You deal with chords from Garrisons book?
    I find a lot of shapes. But there are some shortcomings. Do You thing this Garrisons system is good for learning chords? Its challenge for me.
    Cheers!
    The chords in the book are guide tones on the third and fourth strings. Fewell then expands the guide tones into three note voicings by adding a chord tone or tension note on the second string. The system is good if you want to learn voice leading with guide tones.

  4. #53

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    Following this thread.

  5. #54

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    Hey. How's playing Fewell's triads? Does anyone develop this approach? Any insights?
    I am currently working on voicings built on the basis of extensions from triads. This gives you a lot of extra options when playing chords. With one m7 chord you can make 3-4 cool extensions and play interesting colors.
    Is Fewell's second book additional material for playing chords? Has anyone worked with this material?

  6. #55

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    Fewell's second book goes much deeper into this topic and more on the basis of more complex harmony. Currently working on the chapter(s) about altered dominants and the application of melodic minor to play over them.

  7. #56

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    Hi everyone again.

    I am reading Fewell's book after several months. The further into the forest the more trees can be seen
    Therefore, I have a few questions for people who are already more advanced in this material.

    1. Examples of phrasing from a book are in the vibe of classic jazz. Have any of you tried with this "method" to get a more modern sound? How do you have an idea for this?

    2. How do I get the melodic minor over m7 chords sound?

    3. Are there other ways to get altered sounds than playing m6 / m7 chords starts from b2 and 4 of the M7 chord?

    I will be grateful for your help.

    greetings
    Freud

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by freud
    Hi everyone again.

    I am reading Fewell's book after several months. The further into the forest the more trees can be seen
    Therefore, I have a few questions for people who are already more advanced in this material.

    1. Examples of phrasing from a book are in the vibe of classic jazz. Have any of you tried with this "method" to get a more modern sound? How do you have an idea for this?

    2. How do I get the melodic minor over m7 chords sound?

    3. Are there other ways to get altered sounds than playing m6 / m7 chords starts from b2 and 4 of the M7 chord?

    I will be grateful for your help.

    greetings
    Freud


    For No.1: no idea here

    No.2: substitute the b7 for a maj 7

    No.3: learn the chords/arpeggios of the melodic minor scale a half step above the dom7 chord (not maj7) and use those to build lines over the V chord.


    Have you looked into Garrison's second book - A Harmonic Approach? He goes deeper into the harmonic context of building lines there.

    Hope this helps


    (Still considering myself a beginner)

  9. #58

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    Tommo, thanks a lot for your reply.

    1. This is the biggest problem for me with the Fewell method. Everything I play (my self phrases) and the examples from the book sound like old fashioned, classical jazz. I am looking for more modern sounds in my playing.I am now working on adding chromatic notes to the Fewell triads. I try to use side stepping. But it still sounds like classic jazz phrases from the 20s Maybe everything depends on phrasing? Maybe rhythms is answer? For now, this is the best method I've met in terms of fretboard organization. And it is user friendly

    2. Thanks

    3. Interesting. I'll check how it works.

    No, I didn't want to read Fewell's second book because I haven't finished the first. I want to get to know it thoroughly and develop myself in this area. Only then will I reach for the second book.

    Tommo, what kind of music do you play? What style of jazz?How do you use the Fewell method?

    Anyone else from this forum exploring the topic?

    greetings,Freud.

  10. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by freud
    Tommo, thanks a lot for your reply.

    1. This is the biggest problem for me with the Fewell method. Everything I play (my self phrases) and the examples from the book sound like old fashioned, classical jazz. I am looking for more modern sounds in my playing.I am now working on adding chromatic notes to the Fewell triads. I try to use side stepping. But it still sounds like classic jazz phrases from the 20s Maybe everything depends on phrasing? Maybe rhythms is answer? For now, this is the best method I've met in terms of fretboard organization. And it is user friendly

    2. Thanks

    3. Interesting. I'll check how it works.

    No, I didn't want to read Fewell's second book because I haven't finished the first. I want to get to know it thoroughly and develop myself in this area. Only then will I reach for the second book.

    Tommo, what kind of music do you play? What style of jazz?How do you use the Fewell method?

    Anyone else from this forum exploring the topic?

    greetings,Freud.
    I know this seems indirect but in the last part of the first book he goes over altered notes b9, #9, and b13. Using 'the method' from the beginning part of his book (pg.18) you can construct a MinMaj7#11 arppegio (using the altered notes) the same way you did for the minor 11th but this time up a half step from the dominant chord.

    Minor, Augmented, Major and then minor triad (half step below original minor triad) and thats how you get the MinMaj7#11 arppegio. You get a pretty modern sound (based on Phrygian b4 scale). Going even further you can try to do spread triads on a same string set but I'm not sure if standard tuning would allow you to do that.. Maybe! (I play different tuning).

  11. #60

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    Garrison gets some of the lines he uses to illustrate the whole thing straight from Wes. I think Parker uses triads a lot - I think its his way of 'finding the pretty notes' - of playing lines out of the extensions of the chords etc.

    one of the biggest practical things for me with the idea of unpacking the harmony of a sound (I'm still focused on min 7th and mm 7th sounds) using triads built on 1 - b3 - 5 - b7 (1-b3-5-7) - is that it enables you to play one idea in four different parts of the sound (without moving to a different sound). It seems to me way better than loads of arpeggios that you conceive as just adding colour tones to the same home triad.

    and when you unpack these two sounds in this way you can then look at (hear) the sounds you get in lots of different ways (supported by different sorts of chords). Perhaps the most striking is that you can hear e.g. a Cmaj7th idea (using triads derived from Am) as a D7 (or Am6) idea: but there are so many of these harmonic equivalences - and they're built into the changes of standard tunes.

    Am7 - Cmaj7 - D7 - Fmaj7sharp11 - Em7 - Fsharpmin7flat5

  12. #61

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    Is there any stepwise motion in this book?

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by corpse
    Is there any stepwise motion in this book?
    Not sure what you mean by that....

  14. #63

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    Is everything going from arpeggio to arpeggio with no notes in between? Of course I know you can, but I'm wondering about what is covered in the book.

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by corpse
    Is everything going from arpeggio to arpeggio with no notes in between? Of course I know you can, but I'm wondering about what is covered in the book.
    I see. Some time after the basics have been covered it's about approach notes, enclosures etc. for example - especially when going from one chord to the next.
    And considering the use of upper extensions it's much more than just plain arpeggios.

  16. #65

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    Hi. Thank you all for the answers.

    This week, I worked on how to get a "modern vibe" in lines using Garrison's method. And in my opinion it all depends on phrasing.

    Groyniad, do you have any plans to make any other film on the progress of learning this method? After these years, do you still think that this is a good way to learn her and devote her time and hours of study?

    Jazznylon, thank you for your reply. But I didn't understand everything. Do I think that I can build MinMaj7 arpegiio with Garrison's triads? Is playing triads half step above the root (on the dominant chord) is the same?

    Greetings to all!

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by freud
    Hi. Thank you all for the answers.

    This week, I worked on how to get a "modern vibe" in lines using Garrison's method. And in my opinion it all depends on phrasing.

    Groyniad, do you have any plans to make any other film on the progress of learning this method? After these years, do you still think that this is a good way to learn her and devote her time and hours of study?

    Jazznylon, thank you for your reply. But I didn't understand everything. Do I think that I can build MinMaj7 arpegiio with Garrison's triads? Is playing triads half step above the root (on the dominant chord) is the same?

    Greetings to all!
    The concept is the same but the triads are a bit different. So if you see a G7 chord play this: Ab minor, Cb Augmented, Eb Major, G minor and then back to Ab minor. You'll get the MinMaj#11. Its all optional of course. Hope this helps.. !

  18. #67

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    Freud, Fewell gets into altered sounds later in the book (ch 11 and 12), but for more modern sounds you might want to check out his second book, A Harmonic Approach.

    Incidentally, I would be up for a Garrison Fewell study group if there are other interested parties.

  19. #68

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    Hi. Thank You all for the answers.

    Jazznylon - very cool sounds! A bit difficult fingerring because ........... new to me, but worth studying. Do you use these triads in parallel with Fewell's triads?


    I started using side stepping to add some pepper to Fewell's triads. The phrases sounds more interesting.

    I haven't read his second book yet. For now, I'm learning the first one Enough learning for a year maybe two?

    Jehu - a good idea with this group. But I think we need some more interested people?

    How do you look at the triads on a fretboard? As for one big pattern? Or do you divide it into 4 base triads and then are you looking for "branches" of other colors from them? Or maybe as separate small triads all over the neck?

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jehu

    Incidentally, I would be up for a Garrison Fewell study group if there are other interested parties.

    I would be too if you guys want to kick it off.

  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by freud
    Hi. Thank You all for the answers.

    Jazznylon - very cool sounds! A bit difficult fingerring because ........... new to me, but worth studying. Do you use these triads in parallel with Fewell's triads?


    I started using side stepping to add some pepper to Fewell's triads. The phrases sounds more interesting.

    I haven't read his second book yet. For now, I'm learning the first one Enough learning for a year maybe two?

    Jehu - a good idea with this group. But I think we need some more interested people?

    How do you look at the triads on a fretboard? As for one big pattern? Or do you divide it into 4 base triads and then are you looking for "branches" of other colors from them? Or maybe as separate small triads all over the neck?
    Yes. That one and also the min7b5 chord as well in parallel with the min 11 (I think he goes over the m7b5 chord midway through the book). I don't have the second book yet but willing to join in the group as well if possible. I'm gonna order the second book later this week to see what its all about.

    I think ideally we should be able to see them both at the same time if possible in terms of patterns. In the book there are a couple of big patterns in 12 keys before the 4 split triads thing. I'm looking into it right now and see if I can do the min7b5 and minmaj7#11 as well basing it on the big min 11 fingerings

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    A bit about stacked triads from Carol Kaye, from whom I learned this stuff.

    >>>>>.
    Coltrane etal. all took notice of this and started their stacking of triads from Dm....and on the upper level, ignored the Bmb5 but made it Bm, then changed Dm to D (major) then it was Fm A Cm etc. essentially adding the A chord on top of the G chord, ...THAT as well as back-cycling the m7ths is what they "modal".....
    .
    I gather this is a system for going "outside".

  23. #72

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